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  1. Kristoffer Ahlstrom (2005). Incorporating Feminist Standpoint Theory. SATS 6 (2):79-92.
    As has been noted by Alvin Goldman, there are some very interesting similarities between his Veritistic Social Epistemology (VSE) and Sandra Harding's Feminist Standpoint Theory (FST). In the present paper, it is argued that these similarities are so significant as to motivate an incorporation of FST into VSE, considering that (i) a substantial common ground can be found; (ii) the claims that go beyond this common ground are logically compatible; and (iii) the generality of VSE not only does justice to (...)
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  2. Barbara S. Andrew (2001). Book Review: Mariam Fraser. Identity Without Selfhood: Bisexuality and Simone de Beauvoir. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999. [REVIEW] Hypatia 16 (3):161-163.
  3. Alison Bailey (2005). Book Review: Naomi Zack.Women of Color and Philosophy. Malden, Mass.: Blackwell Publishers, 2000. [REVIEW] Hypatia 20 (1):220-225.
    Naomi Zack’s unique and important collection, Women of Color and Philosophy, brings together for the first time the voices of twelve philosophers who are women of color. She begins with the premise that the work of women of color who do philosophy in academe, but who do not write exclusively on issues of race, ethnicity, and gender, merits a collection of its own. It’s rare that women of color pursue philosophy in academic contexts; Zack counts at most thirty among the (...)
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  4. Eloise A. Buker (1991). Can Feminism Politicize Hermeneutics and Reconstruct Deconstruction? Social Epistemology 5 (4):361 – 369.
  5. Patricia Hill Collins (1992). Transforming the Inner Circle: Dorothy Smith's Challenge to Sociological Theory. Sociological Theory 10 (1):73-80.
  6. Susan Dieleman (2012). An Interview with Miranda Fricker. Social Epistemology 26 (2):253-261.
    Miranda Fricker?s research carefully negotiates the fields of ethics and epistemology, and the places and points where they overlap and intersect. Her 2007 text Epistemic injustice: Power and the ethics of knowing is particularly noteworthy in this regard. It seamlessly integrates these research areas and, in so doing, turns a critical eye on the common assumption that feminist epistemology, characterized by its focus on the role of gender oppression within knowledge practices, is a marginal field of social epistemology. Fricker challenges (...)
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  7. Diane Elam (1991). Is Feminism the Saving Grace of Hermeneutics? Social Epistemology 5 (4):349 – 360.
  8. Josefina Figueira-McDonough, Ann Nichols-Casebolt & F. Ellen Netting (eds.) (1998). The Role of Gender in Practice Knowledge: Claiming Half the Human Experience. Garland Pub..
    Feminist critiques of the social sciences are based on the assumption that because the social sciences were developed for the most part by white, middle-class, Western men, the perspectives of women were ignored. This book offers an approach for integrating gender-related content into the social work curriculum. The distinguished contributors discuss the shortcoming of dominant knowledge, address the pressing need for a gender-integrated curriculum, consider the pedagogies consistent with the implementation of an integrate curriculum, address specific areas in social work (...)
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  9. Maya J. Goldenberg (2013). How Can Feminist Theories of Evidence Assist Clinical Reasoning and Decision-Making? Social Epistemology (TBA):1-28.
    While most of healthcare research and practice fully endorses evidence-based healthcare, a minority view borrows popular themes from philosophy of science like underdetermination and value-ladenness to question the legitimacy of the evidence-based movement’s philosophical underpinnings. While the feminist origins go unacknowledged, those critics adopt a feminist reading of the “gap argument” to challenge the perceived objectivism of evidence-based practice. From there, the critics seem to despair over the “subjective elements” that values introduce to clinical reasoning, demonstrating that they do not (...)
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  10. Heidi Grasswick, Feminist Social Epistemology. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  11. Margret Grebowicz (2007). Standpoint Theory and the Possibility of Justice: A Lyotardian Critique of the Democratization of Knowledge. Hypatia 22 (4):16-29.
    : Grebowicz argues from the perspective of Jean-François Lyotard's critique of deliberative democracy that the project of democratizing knowledge may bring us closer to terror than to justice. The successful formulation of a critical standpoint requires that we figure the political as itself a contested site, and incorporate this into our theorizing about the role of dissent in the production of knowledges. This essay contrasts Lyotard's notion of the differend with Chantal Mouffe's agonistic model.
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  12. Christine James (1997). Feminism and Masculinity: Reconceptualizing the Dichotomy of Reason and Emotion. International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy 17 (1/2):129-152.
    In the context of feminist and postmodern thought, traditional conceptions of masculinity and what it means to be a “Real Man” have been critiqued. In Genevieve Lloyd's The Man of Reason, this critique takes the form of exposing the effect that the distinctive masculinity of the “man of reason” has had on the history of philosophy. One major feature of the masculine-feminine dichotomy will emerge as a key notion for understanding the rest of the paper: the dichotomy of reason-feeling, a (...)
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  13. Helen Longino (2010). Feminist Epistemology at Hypatia's 25th Anniversary. Hypatia 25 (4):733-741.
    This essay surveys twenty-five years of feminist epistemology in the pages of Hypatia. Feminist contributions have addressed the affective dimensions of knowledge; the natures of justification, rationality, and the cognitive agent; and the nature of truth. They reflect thinking from both analytic and continental philosophical traditions and offer a rich tapestry of ideas from which to continue challenging tradition and forging analytical tools for the problems ahead.
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  14. Jen McWeeny (2007). The Disadvantages of Radical Alterity for a Comparative Methodology. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 7:125-130.
    The idea of a philosophical Other as comparativists have often historically used it to signify radical alterity, although sometimes a remedy and correction for the erroneous generalizations which originate from a presupposition of human sameness, merely shifts the center of philosophy's unchallenged assumptions in at least two ways. First, the notion of a philosophical Other avoids an explicit characterization of how one recognizes that one is philosophizing in the sphere of this Other and of what "otherness" is philosophically interesting. Second, (...)
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  15. José Medina (2012). Hermeneutical Injustice and Polyphonic Contextualism: Social Silences and Shared Hermeneutical Responsibilities. Social Epistemology 26 (2):201-220.
    While in agreement with Miranda Fricker?s context-sensitive approach to hermeneutical injustice, this paper argues that this contextualist approach has to be pluralized and rendered relational in more complex ways. In the first place, I argue that the normative assessment of social silences and the epistemic harms they generate cannot be properly carried out without a pluralistic analysis of the different interpretative communities and expressive practices that coexist in the social context in question. Social silences and hermeneutical gaps are misrepresented if (...)
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  16. Gaile Pohlhaus (2006). Knowing (with) Others. Social Philosophy Today 22:187-198.
    Feminist epistemologists and feminist philosophers of science have argued that our efforts to know the world are always situated, accompanied by such things as desires, beliefs, and interests that guide and shape what it is we discover and perhaps even what we can know. If this is the case, how is one to be receptive to that which is outside of the purview of one’s current understanding of the world? Some feminists have argued that in order to know more effectively (...)
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  17. Devora Shapiro (2012). “Objectivity” and the Arbitration of Experiential Knowledge. Social Philosophy Today 28:67-82.
    In order to arbitrate conflicting propositional knowledge claims – such as when two individuals claim to know the height of a tree in the yard – there is (ostensibly) a “fact of the matter” about who is correct. Experiential, non-propositional knowledge, on the other hand, is not so obviously mediated. For one, experiential knowledge is -- at least partially – subjective. This means that one of experiential knowledge’s virtues is just that it is personal in its foundations and cannot be (...)
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