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  1. Daniel Albright (1981). Representation and the Imagination: Beckett, Kafka, Nabokov, and Schoenberg. University of Chicago Press.
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  2. R. T. Allen (1986). The Reality of Responses to Fiction. British Journal of Aesthetics 26 (1):64-68.
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  3. Peter Alward, Speech Acts and Fictionality.
    A common approach to drawing boundary between fiction and non-fiction is by appeal to the kinds of speech acts performed by authors of works of the respective categories. Searle, for example, takes fiction to be the product of illocutionary pretense of various kinds on the part of authors and non-fiction to be the product of genuine illocutionary action.1 Currie, in contrast, takes fiction to be the product of sui generis fictional illocutionary action on the part of authors and non-fiction to (...)
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  4. Peter Alward (2006). Leave Me Out of It: De Re, but Not de Se, Imaginative Engagement with Fiction. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (4):451–459.
    I have been dissatisfied with Walton’s make-believe model of appreciator engagement with fiction ever since my first encounter with it as a graduate student.1 What I have always objected to is not the suggestion that such engagement is broadly speaking imaginative; rather, it is the suggestion that it specifically involves de se imaginative activity on the part of appreciators. That is, while I concede that appreciators imagine (de re) of the fictional works they experience that they are thus and so, (...)
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  5. Monroe C. Beardsley (1981). Fiction as Representation. Synthese 46 (3):291 - 313.
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  6. R. W. Beardsmore (1983). The Censorship of Works of Art. In Peter Lamarque (ed.), Philosophy and Fiction: Essays in Literary Aesthetics. Aberdeen University Press.
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  7. Catherine Belsey (2013). Does the Study of English Matter?: Fiction and Customary Knowledge. Substance 42 (2):114-127.
    Over time, we in English departments have resigned ourselves to prophecies of doom. Our discipline is said to be in terminal decline, and civilization with it. Usually, it is our own fault: the value of our work, so the story has gone, is threatened from within, whether by submission to esoteric theories on the one hand, or by dissipation into the banalities of cultural studies on the other. Our only hope, they tell us, is the immediate restoration of the old (...)
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  8. Michael Benton (1982). Reading Fiction: Ten Paradoxes. British Journal of Aesthetics 22 (4):301-310.
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  9. José Luis Bermúdez & Sebastian Gardner (eds.) (2003). Art and Morality. Routledge.
    Art and Morality is a collection of groundbreaking new papers on the theme of aesthetics and ethics, and the link between the two subjects. A group of world-class contributors tackle the important question that arise when one thinks about the moral dimensions of art and the aesthetic dimension of moral life. The volume is a significant contribution to the philosophical literature, opening up unexplored questions and shedding new light on more traditional debates in aesthetics. The topics explored include the relation (...)
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  10. Shameem Black (2009). Fiction Across Borders: Imagining the Lives of Others in Late-Twentieth-Century Novels. Columbia University Press.
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  11. George Bluestone (1961). Time in Film and Fiction. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 19 (3):311-315.
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  12. Elisabeth Camp (2009). Two Varieties of Literary Imagination: Metaphor, Fiction, and Thought Experiments. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 33 (1):107-130.
    Recently, philosophers have discovered that they have a lot to learn from, or at least to ponder about, fiction. Many metaphysicians are attracted to fiction as a model for our talk about purported objects and properties, such as numbers, morality, and possible worlds, without embracing a robust Platonist ontology. In addition, a growing group of philosophers of mind are interested in the implications of our engagement with fiction for our understanding of the mind and emotions: If I don’t believe that (...)
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  13. Noël Carroll (1999). Defending Mass Art: A Response to Kathleen Higgins's "Mass Appeal". Philosophy and Literature 23 (2):378-386.
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  14. William Charlton (1986). Radford and Allen on Being Moved by Fiction: A Rejoinder. British Journal of Aesthetics 26 (4):391-394.
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  15. Stephen R. L. Clark (1995). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.
    Immortality has long preoccupied everyone from alchemists to science fiction writers. In this intriguing investigation, Stephen Clark contends that the genre of science fiction writing enables the investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He shows how fantasy accounts of phenomena such as resurrection, outer body experience, reincarnation or life extending medicines can be related to philosophy in interesting ways. Reading Western myths such as that of vampire, he examines the ways fear and hopes of (...)
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  16. Alan Collett (1989). Literature, Fiction and Autobiography. British Journal of Aesthetics 29 (4):341-352.
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  17. Albert Cook (1959). The Beginning of Fiction: Cervantes. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 17 (4):463-472.
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  18. Roy T. Cook (2013). Canonicity and Normativity in Massive, Serialized, Collaborative Fiction. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (3):271-276.
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  19. John C. Cooley (1957). Professor Goodman's Fact, Fiction, & Forecast. Journal of Philosophy 54 (10):293-311.
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  20. Gregory Currie, Characters and Contingency.
    One way creatures of fiction seem to differ from real things is in their essential properties. While you and I might not have done many of the things we did do, Anna Karenina could not, surely, have been other than a lover of Vronsky. Is that right? Not straightforwardly: while it is true that “Necessarily, someone who was not a lover of Vronsky would not be Anna”, it is also true that “Someone who was necessarily a lover of Vronsky would (...)
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  21. Gregory Currie (2002). Desire in Imagination. In Tamar S. Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.), Conceivability and Possibility. Oxford University Press. 201-221.
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  22. Gregory Currie (1995). Imagination as Simulation: Aesthetics Meets Cognitive Science. In Martin Davies & Tony Stone (eds.), Mental Simulation. Blackwell.
  23. Gregory Currie (1985). What is Fiction? Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 43 (4):385-392.
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  24. Ann Curthoys (2005). Is History Fiction? University of Michigan Press.
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  25. Marcia Eaton (1972). The Truth Value of Literary Statements. British Journal of Aesthetics 12 (2):163-174.
    After summarizing approaches taken previously to the problem of the determination of truth-Value of statements constituting literary works (ryle, Russell, Quine, Strawson, Davidson, Et. Al.) the author argues for a treatment of the problem based upon the linguistic status of such statements as translocutions and their relation to the context in which they occur.
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  26. Catherine Z. Elgin (1993). Understanding: Art and Science. Synthese 95 (1):196-208.
    The arts and the sciences perform many of the same cognitive functions, both serving to advance understanding. This paper explores some of the ways exemplification operates in the two fields. Both scientific experiments and works of art highlight, underscore, display, or convey some of their own features. They thereby focus attention on them, and make them available for examination and projection. Thus, the Michelson-Morley experiment exemplifies the constancy of the speed of light. Jackson Pollock'sNumber One exemplifies the viscosity of paint. (...)
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  27. Matthieu Fontaine & Shahid Rahman (2010). Fiction, Creation and Fictionality : An Overview. Methodos 10.
    La réflexion philosophique sur la non-existence est une thématique qui a été abordée au commencement même de la philosophie et qui suscite, depuis la publication en 1905 de « On Denoting » par Russell, les plus vifs débats en philosophie analytique. Cependant, le débat féroce sur la sémantique des noms propres et des descriptions définies qui surgirent suite à la publication du « On Referring » par Strawson en 1950 n’engagea pas d’étude systématique de la sémantique des fictions. En fait, (...)
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  28. Kate Fullbrook (1990). Free Women: Ethics and Aesthetics in Twentieth-Century Women's Fiction. Temple University Press.
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  29. Manuel García-Carpintero (2013). Norms of Fiction-Making. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (3):339-357.
    I provide a variation on ideas presented by Walton and Currie, elaborating the view that fictive utterances are characterized by a specific form of illocutionary force in the family of directives – a proposal or invitation to imagine. I make some points on the relation between the proposal and the current debates on intentionalist and conventionalist views, and I discuss interesting recent objections made by Stacie Friend to the related, but crucially different, Gricean view of such force advanced by Currie (...)
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  30. Manuel Garcia-Carpintero (2007). Fiction-Making as a Gricean Illocutionary Type. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (2):203–216.
    There are propositions constituting the content of fictions—sometimes of the utmost importance to understand them—which are not explicitly presented, but must somehow be inferred. This essay deals with what these inferences tell us about the nature of fiction. I will criticize three well-known proposals in the literature: those by David Lewis, Gregory Currie, and Kendall Walton. I advocate a proposal of my own, which I will claim improves on theirs. Most important for my purposes, I will argue on this basis, (...)
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  31. Richard J. Gerrig (1989). Reexperiencing Fiction and Non-Fiction. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (3):277-280.
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  32. Jonathan Gilmore (2014). The Epistemology of Fiction and the Question of Invariant Norms. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 75:105-126.
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  33. Nelson Goodman (1954). Fact, Fiction & Forecast. [London]University of London.
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  34. Robert Grant (2003). Imagining the Real: Essays on Politics, Ideology and Literature. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Throughout its ten related essays, Imagining the Real contrasts our abstract imaginings about the human world with the imaginative insights provided by art and experience. It questions, variously, the relevance of game theory and sociobiology to politics the supposed intrinsic values of liberal freedom, cultural change, and democratic action and the claims of Marxism, deconstruction and "Theory" generally to be non-ideological. More positively, it reinterprets fiction as a specific invitation to imagine, and celebrates Shakespeare, L.H. Myers and Beckett as truly (...)
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  35. Robert Grant (2001). Fiction, Meaning, and Utterance. Inquiry 44 (4):389 – 403.
    A Gricean preamble concludes that though utterances have unintended meanings, those cannot be considered apart from their intended meanings. Intention distinguishes artworks from natural phenomena. To allocate an artwork to a genre, to accept its normal authorial boundaries and that its content is not random but chosen, is to concede intention's centrality. Wimsatt and Beardsley were right that meaning is public. But they think 'intention' is 'private' or 'unavailable'. However, it too is public, in the work. Fictions are utterances of (...)
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  36. Anthony Gritten (2008). Literary Music: Writing Music in Contemporary Fiction by Benson, Stephen. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (1):99–102.
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  37. D. W. Harding (1962). Psychological Processes in the Reading of Fiction. British Journal of Aesthetics 2 (2):133-147.
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  38. James Harold (2010). The Value of Fictional Worlds (or Why 'the Lord of the Rings' is Worth Reading). Contemporary Aesthetics 8.
    Some works of fiction are widely held by critics to have little value, yet these works are not only popular but also widely admired in ways that are not always appreciated. In this paper I make use of Kendall Walton’s account of fictional worlds to argue that fictional worlds can and often do have value, including aesthetic value, that is independent of the works that create them. In the process, I critique Walton’s notion of fictional worlds and offer a defense (...)
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  39. Reina Hayaki (2009). Fictions Within Fictions. Philosophical Studies 146 (3):379 - 398.
    This paper examines the logic of fictions within fictions. I argue that consistently nested consistent fictions must have certain formal characteristics. The most important is that they form a tree structure. Depending on one’s theory of fictional objects, additional constraints may apply regarding the appearance of a fictional object in two or more fictional universes. The background motivation for the paper is to use iterated fiction operators as a tool for making sense of iterated modal operators; I conclude by noting (...)
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  40. Oliver Conolly Bashshar Haydar (2008). The Case Against Faction. Philosophy and Literature 32 (2):pp. 347-358.
    "Faction" is a hybrid genre, aiming at the factual accuracy of journalism on the one hand and the literary form of the novel on the other. There is a fundamental tension however between those two aims, given the constraints which factual accuracy places on characterization, plot, and thematic exploration characteristic of the novel. Further, faction cannot be defended on the grounds that factual accuracy is a literary value in faction. Finally, some aspects of faction, such as its inability to refer (...)
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  41. Leo Hickey (1972). The Particular and the General in Fiction. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 30 (3):327-331.
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  42. Sarah Hoffman (2004). Fiction as Action. Philosophia 31 (3-4):513-529.
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  43. Daniel D. Hutto (2011). Understanding Fictional Minds Without Theory of Mind! Style 45 (2):276-282.
    This paper explores the idea that when dealing with certain kinds of narratives, ‘like it or not’, consumers of fiction will bring the same sorts of skills (or at least a subset of them) to bear that they use when dealing with actual minds. Let us call this the ‘Same Resources Thesis’. I believe the ‘Same Resources Thesis’ is true. But this is because I defend the view that engaging in narrative practices is the normal developmental route through which children (...)
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  44. Eileen John (1998). Reading Fiction and Conceptual Knowledge: Philosophical Thought in Literary Context. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (4):331-348.
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  45. Ellwood Johnson (1972). William James and the Art of Fiction. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 30 (3):285-296.
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  46. Zoltán Kanyó (ed.) (1984). Fictionality. Jate Sokszorosit Ó Üzemében.
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  47. Frank Kermode (2000). The Sense of an Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction: With a New Epilogue. Oxford University Press.
    Frank Kermode is one of our most distinguished and beloved critics of English literature. Here, he contributes a new epilogue to his collection of classic lectures on the relationship of fiction to age-old concepts of apocalyptic chaos and crisis. Prompted by the approach of the millennium, he revisits the book which brings his highly concentrated insights to bear on some of the most unyielding philosophical and aesthetic enigmas. Examining the works of writers from Plato to William Burrows, Kermode shows how (...)
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  48. Matthew Kieran (ed.) (2006). Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art. Blackwell Pub..
    Contemporary Debates in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art features pairs of newly commissioned essays by some of the leading theorists working in the field today. Brings together fresh debates on eleven of the most controversial issues in aesthetics and the philosophy of art Topics addressed include the nature of beauty, aesthetic experience, artistic value, and the nature of our emotional responses to art. Each question is treated by a pair of opposing essays written by eminent scholars, and especially commissioned (...)
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  49. Matthew Kieran & Dominic Lopes (eds.) (2003). Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge.
    Imagination is a central concept in aesthetics with close ties to issues in the philosophy of mind and the philosophy of language, yet it has not received the kind of sustained, critical attention it deserves. Imagination, Philosophy and the Arts represents the work of fifteen young yet distinguished philosophers of art, who critically examine just how and in what form the notion of imagination illuminates fundamental problems in the philosophy of art. All new papers, a strong collection on the imagination (...)
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  50. Peter King, The Limits of Creation.
    Novelists and other producers of fiction can make many mistakes (including becoming novelists and other producers of fiction), but there are three kinds of mistake that stem from the writer's ignorance. First, there's the purely external mistake, which occurs in the..
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