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  1. David Adams & Hans Blumenberg (1998). Does It Matter When? On Time Indifference. Philosophy and Literature 22 (1):212-218.
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  2. Gaetano Albergo (2013). L'impegno ontologico del pretense. Rivista di Estetica 53 (53):155-177.
    It is well known that, from the second year of life, children engage in imaginative activities and pretend play. Pretending is changing the nature of perceptual inputs at will. In this paper I shall take up the question of young children’s knowledge about the pretend-real distinctions. According to Josef Perner, they have an immature concept, called prelief, because they do not differentiate between believing and pretending. But, we know that belief and pretense have different inputs. Imagination is at the whim (...)
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  3. Daniel Albright (1981). Representation and the Imagination: Beckett, Kafka, Nabokov, and Schoenberg. University of Chicago Press.
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  4. R. T. Allen (1986). The Reality of Responses to Fiction. British Journal of Aesthetics 26 (1):64-68.
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  5. Peter Alward, For the Ubiquity.
    Kania[1] has recently developed an argument which poses a serious challenge to the “ubiquity thesis†– the view that every literary narrative[2] necessarily has a fictional narrator.[3] Kania characterizes a fictional narrator as a (possibly non-human) agent who tells (or is responsible for) the narrative and who exists on “the same..
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  6. Peter Alward, Reading, Writing, and Speech Act Theory: Prolegomena to Any Future Logic of Fiction.
    meaning of a proper name is simply its referent.[1] This thesis, however, brings with it a whole host of problems. One particularly thorny difficulty is that of negative existentials, sentences of the form ‘N does not exist’ (where ‘N’ is a proper name). Intuitively, some such sentences are true, but the direct reference theory seems to imply that they must be either false or meaningless. After all, if the meaning of a name is just its referent, then a sentence such (...)
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  7. Peter Alward, Speech Acts and Fictionality.
    A common approach to drawing boundary between fiction and non-fiction is by appeal to the kinds of speech acts performed by authors of works of the respective categories. Searle, for example, takes fiction to be the product of illocutionary pretense of various kinds on the part of authors and non-fiction to be the product of genuine illocutionary action.1 Currie, in contrast, takes fiction to be the product of sui generis fictional illocutionary action on the part of authors and non-fiction to (...)
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  8. Peter Alward, For the Ubiquity.
    Kania[1] has recently developed an argument which poses a serious challenge to the “ubiquity thesis†– the view that every literary narrative[2] necessarily has a fictional narrator.[3] Kania characterizes a fictional narrator as a (possibly non-human) agent who tells (or is responsible for) the narrative and who exists on “the same..
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  9. Peter Alward (2006). Leave Me Out of It: De Re, but Not de Se, Imaginative Engagement with Fiction. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (4):451–459.
    I have been dissatisfied with Walton’s make-believe model of appreciator engagement with fiction ever since my first encounter with it as a graduate student.1 What I have always objected to is not the suggestion that such engagement is broadly speaking imaginative; rather, it is the suggestion that it specifically involves de se imaginative activity on the part of appreciators. That is, while I concede that appreciators imagine (de re) of the fictional works they experience that they are thus and so, (...)
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  10. Eve Tavor Bannet (1989). Pluralist Theory-Fictions and Fictional Politics. Philosophy and Literature 13 (1):28-41.
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  11. S. Bates (1998). Lamarque, P.-Fictional Points of View. Philosophical Books 39:78-80.
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  12. Cathleen M. Bauschatz (1989). Before Reading: Narrative Conventions and the Politics of Interpretation (Review). Philosophy and Literature 13 (2):388-390.
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  13. Monroe C. Beardsley (1981). Fiction as Representation. Synthese 46 (3):291 - 313.
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  14. Monroe C. Beardsley (1976). Philosophy and the Novel: Philosophical Aspects Of_ Middlemarch, Anna Karenina, The Brothers Karamazov, A la Recherche du Temps Perdu, _and of the Methods of Criticism (Review). Philosophy and Literature 1 (1):101-106.
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  15. R. W. Beardsmore (1983). The Censorship of Works of Art. In Peter Lamarque (ed.), Philosophy and Fiction: Essays in Literary Aesthetics. Aberdeen University Press.
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  16. Catherine Belsey (2013). Does the Study of English Matter?: Fiction and Customary Knowledge. Substance 42 (2):114-127.
    Over time, we in English departments have resigned ourselves to prophecies of doom. Our discipline is said to be in terminal decline, and civilization with it. Usually, it is our own fault: the value of our work, so the story has gone, is threatened from within, whether by submission to esoteric theories on the one hand, or by dissipation into the banalities of cultural studies on the other. Our only hope, they tell us, is the immediate restoration of the old (...)
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  17. Michael Benton (forthcoming). Visualizing Narrative: Bridging the" Aesthetic Gap". Journal of Aesthetic Education.
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  18. Michael Benton (1982). Reading Fiction: Ten Paradoxes. British Journal of Aesthetics 22 (4):301-310.
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  19. José Luis Bermúdez & Sebastian Gardner (eds.) (2003). Art and Morality. Routledge.
    Art and Morality is a collection of groundbreaking new papers on the theme of aesthetics and ethics, and the link between the two subjects. A group of world-class contributors tackle the important question that arise when one thinks about the moral dimensions of art and the aesthetic dimension of moral life. The volume is a significant contribution to the philosophical literature, opening up unexplored questions and shedding new light on more traditional debates in aesthetics. The topics explored include the relation (...)
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  20. Shameem Black (2009). Fiction Across Borders: Imagining the Lives of Others in Late-Twentieth-Century Novels. Columbia University Press.
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  21. Robert Blanchet & Margrethe Bruun Vaage (2012). Don, Peggy, and Other Fictional Friends? Engaging with Characters in Television Series. Projections 6 (2):18-41.
    As the frequent use of metaphors like friendship or relationship in academic and colloquial discourse on serial television suggests, long-term narratives seem to add something to the spectator's engagement with fictional characters that is not fully captured by terms such as empathy and sympathy. Drawing on philosophical accounts of friendship and psychological theories on the formation of close relationships, this article clarifies in what respect the friendship metaphor is warranted. The article proposes several hypotheses that will enhance cognitive theories of (...)
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  22. George Bluestone (1961). Time in Film and Fiction. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 19 (3):311-315.
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  23. Willard Bohn (1993). Family Secrets and the Psychoanalysis of Narrative (Review). Philosophy and Literature 17 (2):365-366.
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  24. Andrea Bonomi, Fictional Contexts.
    is accounted for, among other things, in terms of particular relations between events (or states1) and places or times. Roughly speaking, an event α is said to occur in a place p (or interval t) if the spatial (temporal) extension of α is located in p (or t). Let the predicate ‘Occ’ denote such a relation. From this point of view, part of the content of the above sentences can be associated, respectively, with formulas such as.
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  25. Roman Bonzon (2003). Fiction and Value. In Matthew Kieran & Dominic Lopes (eds.), Imagination, Philosophy, and the Arts. Routledge. 160--176.
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  26. Paola Bozzi (2005). Rhapsody in Blue: Vilém Flusser und der Vampyroteuthis infernalis. Flusser Studies 2005 (1):1-20.
    The depths of the sea, their obscure inhabitants and their mysteries have always been a rich source of myths and metaphors for authors and philosophers. Fables about giant squids and monstrous octopuses run through the history of literature and culture. The vampire squid is only a small phylogenetic relic, but it provides a useful model for Flusser's hybrid philosophical fiction Vampyroteuthis Infernalis. Flusser slips metaphorically into the creature’s gelatinous skin in order to speculate on the paradigms of postmodern life, measuring (...)
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  27. Cornelia E. Brown (1989). The Imposition of Form: Studies in Narrative Representation and Knowledge (Review). Philosophy and Literature 13 (2):396-397.
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  28. Stephan L. Burton (1991). Novitz on Walton. Philosophy and Literature 15 (2):295-301.
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  29. Emily Caddick Bourne, Book Review: 'Fiction and Fictionalism' by Mark Sainsbury. [REVIEW]
    What is a fictional character? Nothing, according to Mark Sainsbury. Yet it is true to say that there are fictional characters. How? Because there are fictions according to which there are specific individuals. And it can be true to say that Anna Karenina is more intelligent than Emma Bovary. How? Because the truth-value of the sentence is to be assessed under the (false) presupposition that there are such people as Emma and Anna. And it is true to say that Conan (...)
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  30. Emily Caddick Bourne, Making Sense of Metafiction.
    Event summary: The conference focuses on metafiction, taken to cover any fiction which represents itself as a fiction. Because metafictions acknowledge their own status as fictions, they are sometimes known as ‘reflexive’ or ‘self-conscious’ fictions, and sometimes generate apparently paradoxical results. The conference will explore what this reflexivity amounts to, how it distinguishes the metafictional from the non-metafictional works, and what impact this has on questions about the nature of fiction in general. Metafiction amounts to a significant – but not (...)
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  31. Emily Caddick Bourne, The Real Problem with Fictional Feelings.
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  32. Elisabeth Camp (2009). Two Varieties of Literary Imagination: Metaphor, Fiction, and Thought Experiments. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 33 (1):107-130.
    Recently, philosophers have discovered that they have a lot to learn from, or at least to ponder about, fiction. Many metaphysicians are attracted to fiction as a model for our talk about purported objects and properties, such as numbers, morality, and possible worlds, without embracing a robust Platonist ontology. In addition, a growing group of philosophers of mind are interested in the implications of our engagement with fiction for our understanding of the mind and emotions: If I don’t believe that (...)
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  33. Milič Čapek (1972). The Fiction of Instants. In J. T. Fraser, F. Haber & G. Muller (eds.), The Study of Time. Springer-Verlag. 332--344.
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  34. Noël Carroll (1999). Defending Mass Art: A Response to Kathleen Higgins's "Mass Appeal". Philosophy and Literature 23 (2):378-386.
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  35. Noël Carroll (1997). Fiction, Non-Fiction, and the Film of Presumptive Assertion: A Conceptual Analysis. In Richard Allen & Murray Smith (eds.), Film Theory and Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 173--202.
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  36. Noël Carroll (1994). The Paradox of Junk Fiction. Philosophy and Literature 18 (2):225-241.
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  37. L. B. Cebik (1974). Fictional Narrative and Truth: Some Epistemic Considerations. Southern Journal of Philosophy 12 (1):9-19.
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  38. William Charlton (1986). Radford and Allen on Being Moved by Fiction: A Rejoinder. British Journal of Aesthetics 26 (4):391-394.
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  39. Stephen R. L. Clark (1995). How to Live Forever: Science Fiction and Philosophy. Routledge.
    Immortality has long preoccupied everyone from alchemists to science fiction writers. In this intriguing investigation, Stephen Clark contends that the genre of science fiction writing enables the investigation of philosophical questions about immortality without the constraints of academic philosophy. He shows how fantasy accounts of phenomena such as resurrection, outer body experience, reincarnation or life extending medicines can be related to philosophy in interesting ways. Reading Western myths such as that of vampire, he examines the ways fear and hopes of (...)
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  40. Paul Cobley (2001). Analysing Narrative Genres. Sign Systems Studies 29 (2):479-502.
    There can be little doubt that human consciousness is now suffused with narrative. In the West, narrative is the focus of a number of lucrative industries and narratives proliferate as never before. The importance of popular genres in current narrative is an index of the demise of authorship in the face of new media and has necessitated the renewal of the term "genre" in narrative analysis over the last hundred years or so. However. this article attempts to make clear that (...)
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  41. Alan Collett (1989). Literature, Fiction and Autobiography. British Journal of Aesthetics 29 (4):341-352.
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  42. Francis X. Connolly (1942). The Social Reference of Fiction. Thought 17 (2):200-204.
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  43. Daniel W. Conway (1991). Thus Spoke Rorty: The Perils of Narrative Self-Creation. Philosophy and Literature 15 (1):103-110.
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  44. Albert Cook (1959). The Beginning of Fiction: Cervantes. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 17 (4):463-472.
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  45. Roy T. Cook (2013). Canonicity and Normativity in Massive, Serialized, Collaborative Fiction. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (3):271-276.
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  46. John C. Cooley (1957). Professor Goodman's Fact, Fiction, & Forecast. Journal of Philosophy 54 (10):293-311.
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  47. Marcel Cornis-Pope (2005). Rethinking Postmodern Liminality: Marginocentric Characters and Projects in Thomas Pynchon's Polysystemic Fiction. Symploke 5 (1):27-47.
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  48. Dale Cosper (1999). Camus: Love and Sexuality. Philosophy and Literature 23 (1):233-236.
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  49. Charles Crittenden (1973). Thinking About Non-Being. Inquiry 16 (1-4):290 – 312.
    There are genuine references to non?existent objects, as can be seen through elucidating reference in common language and applying the criteria enumerated to expressions used in writing and speaking about fiction. The concept of a fictitious entity is simply accepted in the adoption of the ?language?game? of fiction and has no undesirable ontological consequences. To think otherwise is to fail to attend to the conceptual status of such talk. Accounts of fictional discourse by Russell, Ryle, and Chisholm are found objectionable. (...)
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  50. Charles Crittenden (1966). Fictional Existence. American Philosophical Quarterly 3 (4):317 - 321.
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