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  1. Jerold J. Abrams (2001). William Irwin (Editor). Seinfeld and Philosophy: A Book About Everything and Nothing. Modern Schoolman 79 (1):91-94.
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  2. Theodore Bach (2010). Pornography as Simulation. In Dave Monroe (ed.), Pornography: Philosophy for Everyone.
    This essay explains the prevalence of porn consumption by modeling it as a form of simulation. According to simulation theory (Gordon 1986, Goldman 2006) people predict and explain other’s behavior by using their own mind to model the mind of a target individual, much like an engineer might use a model aircraft to simulate the behavior of an actual aircraft. However, the cognitive mechanisms required for simulation have application outside of psychological interpretation. For example, it is plausible that while consuming (...)
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  3. Richard Brown & Kevin S. Decker (eds.) (2009). Terminator and Philosophy: I'll Be Back, Therefore I Am. John Wiley & Sons.
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  4. Melinda Campbell (2011). Hotels on the Border: Cinematic Situations of Transgression and Transcendence. In Hyperborean Wind: Reflections on Design and the City.
    Three important 20th-century American films prominently feature a hotel as the site for morally ambiguous and sexually charged events depicted in the plot: Orson Welles's Touch of Evil (1958), Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho (1960), and Joel and Ethan Coen's Barton Fink (1991). While all three films have a multiplicity of elements that present how hotel spaces open horizons displaying human behaviors both normal and abnormal, moral and immoral, secret and public, sane and insane, the paper presents an extended argument for seeing (...)
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  5. Allan Casebier (1988). Transcendence, Transparency, and Transaction: Husserl's Middle Road to Cinematic Representation. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 5 (2):127-141.
  6. Lorenzo Chiesa (2012). Of Bastard Man and Evil Woman, or, the Horror of Sex. Film-Philosophy 16 (1):199-212.
    Lars von Trier’s Antichrist (2009) has often been described as a ‘gothic’, if not straightforwardly ‘horror’ movie. While this claim could easily be challenged with regard to strict genre definitions, it is doubtless the case that the film deals very explicitly with fear, first and foremost the female protagonist’s fear of herself, which is placed at the top of the so-called ‘pyramid of fear’ drawn by her therapist/wanna-be-Saviour partner. My opinion is that Antichrist perfectly displays the horrific effects of the (...)
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  7. Austin Corbett (2009). Beyond Ghost in the (Human) Shell. Journal of Evolution and Technology 20 (1):43-50.
    The cyborg inscribes itself nearly everywhere, forcing us to re-examine discourses of humanity, modernity, Japan, and technology. I will trace the early history of the cyborg, from its hidden roots and precursors in fin de siècle Gothic fiction to its fully formed conception in 1990s science fiction and Donna Haraway’s Cyborg Manifesto. I will then move beyond the well-known cyborg genealogy to delve into contemporary portrayals that radically expand the cyborg’s political potential, and posthuman role, through an analysis of Kenji (...)
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  8. C. E. Emmer (2008). Crowther and the Kantian Sublime in Art. In Valerio Rohden, Ricardo R. Terra & Guido A. de Almeida (eds.), Recht und Frieden in der Philosophie Kants: Akten des X. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses [Right and Peace in Kant's Philosophy: Proceedings of the 10th International Kant Congress] 5 vols. Walter de Gruyter.
    Paul Crowther, in his book, The Kantian Sublime (1989), works to reconstruct Kant's aesthetics in order to make its continued relevance to contemporary aesthetic concerns more visible. The present article remains within the area of Crowther's "cognitive" sublime, to show that there is much space for expanding upon Kantian varieties of the sublime, particularly in art.
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  9. Russell Ford (2010). The Picture of Abjection: Film, Fetish, and the Nature of Difference by Chanter, Tina. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (1):79-81.
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  10. Ernest Garrett, How Humor Works, Part II - Status Loss Theory as the Logical Basis of All Forms of Humor.
    This paper takes the Status Loss Theory (introduced and explained in the first "How Humor Works" paper), and applies it to 40 real-world examples, including memes, radio and TV shows, movie and comic book tropes, song parodies, humor sayings, stand-up comedy cliches, known psychological quirks of humor, and more, to demonstrate the theory's potential to function as the first clear, complete, logical, and simple basis for defining, studying, and understanding humor in all of its forms.
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  11. Ernest Garrett, "How Humor Works" Introduction - The "Holy Grail" Humor Theory in One Page.
    This paper introduces the "Status Loss Theory of Humor," as detailed in "How Humor Works" and "How Humor Works, Part II" , in a single page. This theory has the potential to fully, clearly, and naturally explain the human humor instinct, and has made predictions that are being confirmed by other studies.
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  12. Ernest Garrett, How Humor Works - A Clear Proposal For a Classic Question.
    A short, clear and complete theory that explains the origins and properties of the human humor instinct, which has been the subject of incomplete research for thousands of years. The paper's theory uses evolutionary psychology and a basic informal equation, and unites the findings of the previous theories, including explaining the logical basis behind many types of humor as well as the common sayings associated with it.
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  13. Carrie Giunta (forthcoming). A Question of Listening: Nancean Resonance, Return and Relation in Charlie Chaplin. In Carrie Giunta & Adrienne Janus (eds.), Nancy and Visual Culture. Edinburgh University Press.
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  14. Carrie Giunta, White Feather or Bowler Hat? Charlie Chaplin and the First World War. No Glory in War.
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  15. Carrie Giunta (2013). The Early Development of Sound in Hollywood Cinema. In Lincoln Geraghty (ed.), Directory of World Cinema: American Hollywood, Vol. 2. Intellect Books.
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  16. Carrie Giunta (2013). United Artists. In John Berra (ed.), Directory of World Cinema: American Independent Vol. 2. Intellect Books.
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  17. Carrie Giunta (2011). Beyond the Soundtrack: Representing Music in Cinema. [REVIEW] Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television 30:132-133.
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  18. Tony E. Jackson (2009). The Technology of the Novel: Writing and Narrative in British Fiction. Johns Hopkins UP.
    This book explains the novel as a genre in terms of spoken language, oral story, and writing. It begins by laying out certain grounding concepts. The cognitive sciences have established that language and story are constitutive elements of the human animal. Both language and story are built into our cognitive make-up and have specifiable qualities. It is also the case that if we think historically and anthropologically, then we can establish that oral story in oral culture is the default kind (...)
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  19. Henry Owen Jacoby (ed.) (2012). Game of Thrones and Philosophy: Logic Cuts Deeper Than Swords. Wiley.
    Machine generated contents note: ForewordAcknowledgments: How I was spared from having to take the BlackIntroduction: So What if Winter Is Coming?Part One. "You Win or You Die"1. Maester Hobbes Goes to King's Landing Greg Littmann2. It is a Great Crime to Lie to a King Don Fallis3. Playing the Game of Thrones: Some Lessons from Machiavelli Marcus Schulzke4. The War in Westeros and Just War Theory Richard H. CorriganPart Two. "The Things I Do for Love"5. Winter is Coming! The Bleak (...)
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  20. Steve Jones (2011). Death of the Image/The Image of Death: Temporality , Torture and Transience in Yuuri Sunohara and Masami Akita's Harakiri Cycle. Journal of Japanese and Korean Cinema 3 (1):163-177.
    Sunohara Yuuri and Akita Masami’s series of six seppuku films (1990) are solely constituted by images of fictionalized death, revolving around the prolonged self-torture of a lone figure committing harakiri. I contend that the protagonist’s auto-immolation mirrors a formal death, each frame ‘killing’ the moment it represents. My analysis aims to explore how the solipsistic nature of selfhood is appositely symbolized by the isolation of the on-screen figures and the insistence with which the six films repeat the same scenario of (...)
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  21. Steve Jones (2011). The Pure Moment of Murder: The Symbolic Function of Bodily Interactions in Horror Film. Projections 6 (2):96-114.
    Both the slasher movie and its more recent counterpart the "torture porn" film centralize graphic depictions of violence. This article inspects the nature of these portrayals by examining a motif commonly found in the cinema of homicide, dubbed here the "pure moment of murder": that is, the moment in which two characters’ bodies adjoin onscreen in an instance of graphic violence. By exploring a number of these incidents (and their various modes of representation) in American horror films ranging from Psycho (...)
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  22. Steve Jones (2010). Time is Wasting': Con/Sequence and S/Pace in the Saw Series. Horror Studies 1 (2):225-239.
    Horror film sequels have not received as much serious critical attention as they deserve – this is especially true of the Saw franchise, which has suffered a general dismissal under the derogatory banner ‘Torture Porn’. In this article I use detailed textual analysis of the Saw series to expound how film sequels employ and complicate expected temporal and spatial relations – in particular, I investigate how the Saw sequels tie space and time into their narrative, methodological and moral sensibilities. Far (...)
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  23. Steve Jones (2010). The Technologies of Isolation. Japanese Studies 30 (2):185-198.
    In this investigation of the Japanese film Kairo, I contemplate how the horrors present in the film relate to the issue of self, by examining a number of interlocking motifs. These include thematic foci on disease and technology which are more intimately and inwardly focused that the film's conclusion first appears to suggest. The true horror here, I argue, is ontological: centred on the self and its divorcing from the exterior world, especially founded in an increased use of and reliance (...)
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  24. Shawn E. Klein (2012). Harry Potter and Humanity: Choices, Love, and Death. Reason Papers 34 (1):33-41.
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  25. Scott A. Lukas & John Marmysz (eds.) (2009). Fear, Cultural Anxiety, and Transformation: Horror, Science Fiction, and Fantasy Films Remade. Lexington Books.
    This collection was inspired by the observation that film remakes offer us the opportunity to revisit important issues, stories, themes, and topics in a manner that is especially relevant and meaningful to contemporary audiences. Like mythic stories that are told again and again in differing ways, film remakes present us with updated perspectives on timeless ideas. While some remakes succeed and others fail aesthetically, they always say something about the culture in which_and for which_they are produced. Contributors explore the ways (...)
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  26. John Marmysz (1996). From Night to Day: Nihilism and the Living Dead. Film and Philosophy 3:138-143.
    Upon its release in 1968, George Romero's Night of the Living Dead was attacked by many critics as an exploitative low budget film of questionable moral value. I argue in this paper that Night of the Living Dead is indeed nihilistic, but in a deeper philosophical sense than the critics had in mind.
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  27. Nuria Sara Miras Boronat (2007). Máscara, Lenguaje y El Sueño Imposible de Ser. la Torre Del Virrey. Revista de Estudios Culturales 4:62-66.
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  28. Enrique Morata, Hal the God.
    On the 2001 theme, a very perfect computer would act like a god does.
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  29. Enrique Morata (2013). The philosophy of Spiderman. Bubok.
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  30. Franco Passalacqua, Università Degli Studi di Milano, Federico Pianzola & Università Degli Studi di Firenze, Continuity and Break Points: Some Aspects of the Contemporary Debate in Narrative Theory.
    This article presents some reflections on the concepts, terminology, and epistemological grounds of narrative theory. Our remarks are focused on the proposals advanced at the first RRN conference and they concern in particular two issues: the theoretical difference between classical and postclassical narratology and the paradigms of the contemporary debate. In the first part of the paper we focus on the definitional task of narrative theory; in the second part we describe the epistemology of and the theories built on two (...)
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  31. Franco Passalacqua, Università Degli Studi di Milano, Federico Pianzola & Università Degli Studi di Firenze, The First RRN Conference. Redefinitions of the Narrative Sequence.
    This is a brief report of the first conference organized in Fribourg (CH) by the Réseau Romand de Narratologie (RRN). The title of the conference was Redefinitons of the Sequence in Postclassical Narratology.
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  32. Constantine Sandis (2009). Hitchcock's Conscious Use of Freud's Unconscious. Europe's Journal of Psychology 3:56-81.
    This paper argues that Hitchcock's so-called 'Freudian' films (esp. Spellbound, Psycho, and Marnie) pay tribute to the cultural magnetism of Freud's ideas whist being critical of the tehories themselves.
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  33. Aaron Allen Schiller (2009). Colorblindness and Black Friends in Stephen Colbert’s America. In Stephen Colbert and Philosophy. Open Court.
    Is there a contradiction in Stephen Colbert’s attitudes towards race? How can he consistently claim to be colorblind and yet hold a national search for a new "black friend"? I argue that Stephen is trying to claim rights and shirk responsibilities on matters of race relations in America, and that his famous notion of "truthiness" is an extension of this attitude to other areas of social and political discourse.
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  34. Janos Toth & Csaba Vass (2012). Clear, Unclear and Non-Media − an Attempt at Conceptualisation. KOME - An International Journal of Pure Communication Inquiry 1 (1):20-30.
    Today, the expression "media" firmly retains a broad language function both in professional and public discourse, the essence of which is a signification of the auditory, visual, audiovisual and digital-electronic "press", including both the tools and agents. The term seems scientific from academic viewpoint and precise in public discourse. However, analogies drawn from some of its connotations, which can serve as a foundation to signify various media organisations, are adequate only for some segments of the semantic field of the term (...)
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  35. Georgios Tsagdis (2013). Songs From the Second Floor. Rattle 4:50-66.
    ‘Beloved be the unknown man and his wife. My fellow man with sleeves, neck and eyes! Beloved be the one who sleeps on his back. The one who wears a torn shoe in the rain. Beloved be the bald man without a hat. The one who catches a finger in a door. Beloved be the one who sweats out of pain or out of shame. The one who pays with what he does not have… Beloved be the ones who sit (...)
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  36. Lorenzo von Matterhorn (ed.) (forthcoming). How I Met Your Mother and Philosophy. Open Court.
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  37. Raymond Aaron Younis (2007). Etopia, Or, After the Illuminist Imaginaries of Modernity. Colloquy 14:81-89.
    The links between utopian and dystopian imaginaries, computer mediated communication technologies and the “digital divide,” in its numerous forms, as well as the links between these things and science fiction, are relatively under-researched. It will be argued here that the tendency to view the internet in terms of utopian or dystopian imaginaries is problematic on a number of levels; it will also be argued that science fiction films which are framed in terms of informatics and computer mediated communication technologies, such (...)
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  38. Raymond Aaron Younis (1994). Wittgenstein. Cinema Papers 99.
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  39. Jakob Zaaiman, For ‘Art’ to Be ‘Art’, It has to Be Strange and Disturbing.
    What follows here is not a definition of art by decree. Nor is this some kind of art manifesto. We are not saying this is how art should be, or could be, but how it is, if you let go of the prison of aesthetics, and follow an infinitely more interesting conceptual trail. This is about uncovering and identifying an approach to art which avoids the triviality of sensory-based aesthetic theory and moves instead towards exploring the experiential worlds that art (...)
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