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  1. Jerold J. Abrams (2001). William Irwin (Editor). Seinfeld and Philosophy: A Book About Everything and Nothing. Modern Schoolman 79 (1):91-94.
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  2. Theodore Bach (2010). Pornography as Simulation. In Dave Monroe (ed.), Pornography: Philosophy for Everyone.
    This essay explains the prevalence of porn consumption by modeling it as a form of simulation. According to simulation theory (Gordon 1986, Goldman 2006) people predict and explain other’s behavior by using their own mind to model the mind of a target individual, much like an engineer might use a model aircraft to simulate the behavior of an actual aircraft. However, the cognitive mechanisms required for simulation have application outside of psychological interpretation. For example, it is plausible that while consuming (...)
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  3. Jeremy Blatter (2015). Screening the Psychological Laboratory: Hugo Münsterberg, Psychotechnics, and the Cinema, 1892–1916. Science in Context 28 (1):53-76.
    According to Hugo Münsterberg, the direct application of experimental psychology to the practical problems of education, law, industry, and art belonged by definition to the domain of psychotechnics. Whether in the form of pedagogical prescription, interrogation technique, hiring practice, or aesthetic principle, the psychotechnical method implied bringing the psychological laboratory to bear on everyday life. There were, however, significant pitfalls to leaving behind the putative purity of the early psychological laboratory in pursuit of technological utility. In the Vocation Bureau, for (...)
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  4. Richard Brown & Kevin S. Decker (eds.) (2009). Terminator and Philosophy: I'll Be Back, Therefore I Am. John Wiley & Sons.
    A timely book that uses science fiction to provoke reflection and discussion on philosophical issues From the nature of mind to the ethics of AI and neural enhancement, science fiction thought experiments fire the philosophical imagination, encouraging us to think outside of the box about classic philosophical problems and even to envision new ones. Science Fiction and Philosophy explores puzzles about virtual reality, transhumanism, whether time travel is possible, the nature of artificial intelligence, and topics in neuroethics, among other timely (...)
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  5. Melinda Campbell (2011). Hotels on the Border: Cinematic Situations of Transgression and Transcendence. In Hyperborean Wind: Reflections on Design and the City.
    Three important 20th-century American films prominently feature a hotel as the site for morally ambiguous and sexually charged events depicted in the plot: Orson Welles's Touch of Evil (1958), Alfred Hitchcock's Psycho (1960), and Joel and Ethan Coen's Barton Fink (1991). While all three films have a multiplicity of elements that present how hotel spaces open horizons displaying human behaviors both normal and abnormal, moral and immoral, secret and public, sane and insane, the paper presents an extended argument for seeing (...)
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  6. Allan Casebier (1988). Transcendence, Transparency, and Transaction: Husserl's Middle Road to Cinematic Representation. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 5 (2):127-141.
  7. Lorenzo Chiesa (2012). Of Bastard Man and Evil Woman, or, the Horror of Sex. Film-Philosophy 16 (1):199-212.
    Lars von Trier’s Antichrist (2009) has often been described as a ‘gothic’, if not straightforwardly ‘horror’ movie. While this claim could easily be challenged with regard to strict genre definitions, it is doubtless the case that the film deals very explicitly with fear, first and foremost the female protagonist’s fear of herself, which is placed at the top of the so-called ‘pyramid of fear’ drawn by her therapist/wanna-be-Saviour partner. My opinion is that Antichrist perfectly displays the horrific effects of the (...)
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  8. Austin Corbett (2009). Beyond Ghost in the (Human) Shell. Journal of Evolution and Technology 20 (1):43-50.
    The cyborg inscribes itself nearly everywhere, forcing us to re-examine discourses of humanity, modernity, Japan, and technology. I will trace the early history of the cyborg, from its hidden roots and precursors in fin de siècle Gothic fiction to its fully formed conception in 1990s science fiction and Donna Haraway’s Cyborg Manifesto. I will then move beyond the well-known cyborg genealogy to delve into contemporary portrayals that radically expand the cyborg’s political potential, and posthuman role, through an analysis of Kenji (...)
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  9. Joanna Crosby, Seth Vannatta & David Bdzak (eds.) (2013). The Wire and Philosophy. Open Court Books.
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  10. Garin Dowd (2006). Introduction: Genre Matters in Theory and Criticism. In Garin Dowd, Lesley Stevenson & Jeremy Strong (eds.), Genre Matters. Intellect Ltd. 11--27.
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  11. C. E. Emmer (2008). Crowther and the Kantian Sublime in Art. In Valerio Rohden, Ricardo R. Terra & Guido A. de Almeida (eds.), Recht und Frieden in der Philosophie Kants: Akten des X. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses [Right and Peace in Kant's Philosophy: Proceedings of the 10th International Kant Congress] 5 vols. Walter de Gruyter
    Paul Crowther, in his book, The Kantian Sublime (1989), works to reconstruct Kant's aesthetics in order to make its continued relevance to contemporary aesthetic concerns more visible. The present article remains within the area of Crowther's "cognitive" sublime, to show that there is much space for expanding upon Kantian varieties of the sublime, particularly in art.
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  12. Russell Ford (2010). The Picture of Abjection: Film, Fetish, and the Nature of Difference by Chanter, Tina. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (1):79-81.
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  13. R. Fotiade, Spectres of Dada: From Man Ray to Marker and Godard.
    An analysis of early Dada experimental practice in photography and film with reference to Roland Barthes's _Camera lucida_ and Derrida's theory of spectrality. The chapter considers the legacy of Dada experiments with still and moving images in the work of post-war filmmakers such as Chris Marker and Jean-Luc Godard.
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  14. Mirela Fuš & Marvin Dupree (2016). Masks, Hearts, and Superheroes. In N. Michaud (ed.), Batman, Superman, and Philosophy. The Open Court Publishing Company 99-108.
    We all think we know who Batman and Superman are. They are polar opposites who both happen to wear their underwear over spandex pants, or at least they once did. So, for comic purists and fans of the cinematic DC Universe it may seem bold to claim that Batman is a true superhero and that Superman is not a true superhero. As a matter of a fact, we want to claim something even stronger: something we will prove independently, without only (...)
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  15. Ernest Garrett, How Humor Works - A Clear Proposal For a Classic Question.
    A short, clear and complete theory that explains the origins and properties of the human humor instinct, which has been the subject of incomplete research for thousands of years. The paper's theory uses evolutionary psychology and a basic informal equation, and unites the findings of the previous theories, including explaining the logical basis behind many types of humor as well as the common sayings associated with it.
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  16. Ernest Garrett, How Humor Works, Part II - Status Loss Theory as the Logical Basis of All Forms of Humor.
    This paper takes the Status Loss Theory (introduced and explained in the first "How Humor Works" paper), and applies it to 40 real-world examples, including memes, radio and TV shows, movie and comic book tropes, song parodies, humor sayings, stand-up comedy cliches, known psychological quirks of humor, and more, to demonstrate the theory's potential to function as the first clear, complete, logical, and simple basis for defining, studying, and understanding humor in all of its forms.
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  17. Ernest Garrett, "How Humor Works" Introduction - The "Holy Grail" Humor Theory in One Page.
    This paper introduces the "Status Loss Theory of Humor," as detailed in "How Humor Works" and "How Humor Works, Part II" , in a single page. This theory has the potential to fully, clearly, and naturally explain the human humor instinct, and has made predictions that are being confirmed by other studies.
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  18. Carrie Giunta (2016). A Question of Listening: Nancean Resonance, Return and Relation in Charlie Chaplin. In Carrie Giunta & Adrienne Janus (eds.), Nancy and Visual Culture. Edinburgh University Press
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  19. Carrie Giunta (2014). White Feather or Bowler Hat? Charlie Chaplin and the First World War. No Glory in War.
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  20. Carrie Giunta (2013). The Early Development of Sound in Hollywood Cinema. In Lincoln Geraghty (ed.), Directory of World Cinema: American Hollywood, Vol. 2. Intellect Books
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  21. Carrie Giunta (2013). United Artists. In John Berra (ed.), Directory of World Cinema: American Independent Vol. 2. Intellect Books
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  22. Carrie Giunta (2011). Beyond the Soundtrack: Representing Music in Cinema. [REVIEW] Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television 30:132-133.
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  23. Debra Jackson (2016). Throwing Like a Slayer: A Phenomenology of Gender Hybridity and Female Resilience in Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Slayage: The Journal of Whedon Studies, 14 (1).
  24. Tony E. Jackson (2009). The Technology of the Novel: Writing and Narrative in British Fiction. Johns Hopkins UP.
    This book explains the novel as a genre in terms of spoken language, oral story, and writing. It begins by laying out certain grounding concepts. The cognitive sciences have established that language and story are constitutive elements of the human animal. Both language and story are built into our cognitive make-up and have specifiable qualities. It is also the case that if we think historically and anthropologically, then we can establish that oral story in oral culture is the default kind (...)
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  25. Henry Owen Jacoby (ed.) (2012). Game of Thrones and Philosophy: Logic Cuts Deeper Than Swords. Wiley.
    Machine generated contents note: ForewordAcknowledgments: How I was spared from having to take the BlackIntroduction: So What if Winter Is Coming?Part One. "You Win or You Die"1. Maester Hobbes Goes to King's Landing Greg Littmann2. It is a Great Crime to Lie to a King Don Fallis3. Playing the Game of Thrones: Some Lessons from Machiavelli Marcus Schulzke4. The War in Westeros and Just War Theory Richard H. CorriganPart Two. "The Things I Do for Love"5. Winter is Coming! The Bleak (...)
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  26. Gary James Jason (2016). Movie Review Of: The Man Who Knew Infinity. Liberty 6.
    This is a review of the biopic of the great mathematician Ramanujan, 'The Man Who Knew Infinity'(2016).
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  27. Steve Jones (2016). Torture Pornopticon: (In)Security Cameras, Self-Governance and Autonomy. In Linnie Blake & Xavier Aldana Reyes (eds.), Digital Horror: Haunted Technologies, Network Panic and the Found Footage Phenomenon. I.B. Tauris 29-41.
    ‘Torture porn’ films centre on themes of abduction, imprisonment and suffering. Within the subgenre, protagonists are typically placed under relentless surveillance by their captors. CCTV features in more than 45 contemporary torture-themed films (including Captivity, Hunger, and Torture Room). Security cameras signify a bridging point between the captors’ ability to observe and to control their prey. Founded on power-imbalance, torture porn’s prison-spaces are panoptical. Despite failing to encapsulate contemporary surveillance’s complexities (see Haggerty, 2011), the panopticon remains a dominant paradigm within (...)
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  28. Steve Jones (2015). Torture Born: Representing Pregnancy and Abortion in Contemporary Survival-Horror. Sexuality and Culture 19 (3):426-443.
    In proportion to the increased emphasis placed on abortion in partisan political debate since the early 2000s, there has been a noticeable upsurge in cultural representations of abortion. This article charts ways in which that increase manifests in contemporary survival-horror. This article contends that numerous contemporary survival-horror films foreground pregnancy. These representations of pregnancy reify the pressures that moralistic, partisan political campaigning places on individuals who consider terminating a pregnancy. These films contribute to public discourse by engaging with abortion as (...)
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  29. Steve Jones (2014). Pretty, Dead: Sociosexuality, Rationality and the Transition Into Zom-Being. In Steve Jones & Shaka McGlotten (eds.), Zombies and Sexuality: Essays on Desire and the Living Dead. McFarland 180-198.
    The undead have been evoked in philosophical hypotheses regarding consciousness, but such discussions often come across as abstract academic exercises, inapplicable to personal experience. Movie zombies illuminate these somewhat opaque philosophical debates via storytelling devices – narrative, characterization, dialogue and so forth – which approach experience and consciousness in an instinctively accessible manner. This chapter focuses on a particular strand of the subgenre: transition narratives, in which human protagonists gradually turn into zombies. Transition stories typically centralize social relationships; affiliations and (...)
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  30. Steve Jones (2013). Twisted Pictures: Morality, Nihilism and Symbolic Suicide in the Saw Series. In James Aston & John Walliss (eds.), To See the Saw Movies: Essays on Torture Porn and Post-9/11 Horror. McFarland 105-122.
    Given that numerous critics have complained about Saw’s apparently confused sense of ethics, it is surprising that little attention has been paid to how morality operates in narrative itself. Coming from a Nietzschean perspective - specifically questioning whether the lead torturer Jigsaw is a passive or a radical nihilist - I seek to rectify that oversight. This philosophical reading of the series explores Jigsaw’s moral stance, which is complicated by his hypocrisy: I contend that this underpins critical complaints regarding the (...)
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  31. Steve Jones (2013). Torture Porn: Popular Horror After Saw. Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Torture Porn is a term that has generated a great deal of controversy during the last decade, critics utilizing the term to dismiss contemporary popular horror cinema as obscene and morally depraved. Arguing primarily in defense of torture-themed horror films, this book seeks to offer a critical overview and examination of the Torture Porn phenomenon, discussing the generic contexts in which it is situated, scrutinizing press responses to the sub-genre, and offering narrative analyses of the sub-genre’s central films; including the (...)
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  32. Steve Jones (2013). No Pain, No Gain: Strategic Repulsion and The Human Centipede. Cine-Excess E-Journal 1.
    Tom Six’s The Human Centipede (First Sequence) (2009) and The Human Centipede II (Full Sequence) (2011) are based on a disturbing premise: people are abducted and stitched together mouth-to-anus. The consequent combinations of faeces and bloodshed, torture and degradation have been roundly vilified by the critical press. Additionally, the sequel was officially banned or heavily censored in numerous countries. This article argues that these reactive forms of suppression fail to engage with the films themselves, or the concepts (such as disgust (...)
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  33. Steve Jones (2013). XXXombies: Economies of Desire and Disgust. Thinkingdead: What the Zombie Apocalypse Means:197--214.
    Drawing on the well-established understanding of the zombie as metaphor for the deadening effects of consumer capitalism, this chapter seeks to account for three distinct changes that contextualise 21st century zombie fiction. The first is situational: the global economic crisis has amplified the anxieties that inspired Romero's critique of consumer capitalism in Dawn of the Dead (1978). The second is intellectual: as Chapman and Anderson (2011) note, there has been an “explosion of research on all aspects of disgust” in recent (...)
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  34. Steve Jones (2012). Mindful Violence? The Rambo Series’ Shifting Aesthetic of Aggression. New Review of Film and Television Studies 10 (4).
    Rambo (2008) marked the return of Sylvester Stallone's iconic action hero. What is most striking about the fourth film (as the response from reviewers testifies), is its graphic violence. My intention here is to critically engage with Rambo (2008) as rewriting the series' established aesthetic of violence. My overarching aim is to highlight how the popular press has sought to read the 2008 version of Rambo according to the discursive narratives surrounding Stallone's 1980s action films. The negative response to Rambo, (...)
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  35. Steve Jones (2012). Mindful Violence? The Rambo Series’ Shifting Aesthetic of Aggression. New Review of Film and Television Studies 10 (4).
    Rambo (2008) marked the return of Sylvester Stallone's iconic action hero. What is most striking about the fourth film (as the response from reviewers testifies), is its graphic violence. My intention here is to critically engage with Rambo (2008) as rewriting the series' established aesthetic of violence. My overarching aim is to highlight how the popular press has sought to read the 2008 version of Rambo according to the discursive narratives surrounding Stallone's 1980s action films. The negative response to Rambo, (...)
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  36. Steve Jones (2012). Gender Monstrosity: Deadgirl and the Sexual Politics of Zombie-Rape. Feminist Media Studies 13 (4):525-539.
    Deadgirl (2008) is based around a group of male teens discovering and claiming ownership of a bound female zombie, using her as a sex slave. This narrative premise raises numerous tensions that are particularly amplified by using a zombie as the film's central victim. The Deadgirl is sexually passive yet monstrous, reifying the horrors associated with the female body in patriarchal discourses. She is objectified on the basis of her gender, and this has led many reviewers to dismiss the film (...)
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  37. Steve Jones (2012). The Lexicon of Offense: The Meanings of Torture, Porn, and ‘Torture Porn”. In Feona Attwood, Ian Hunter, Vincent Campbell & Sharon Lockyear (eds.), Controversial Images: Media Representations on the Edge. Palgrave-Macmillan 186-200.
    Torture porn has been vilified on grounds that are at best unconvincing and at worst incoherent. The subgenre’s remonstrators too often ignore the content of the films themselves, and fail to make sufficiently detailed connections between the subgenre and the cultural sphere. Reactions to torture porn rarely consider what values the films apparently contravene, and why, if the films are offensive, they are simultaneously so popular. The central derisive mechanism in operation is the ill-conceived combination of ‘torture’ and ‘porn’ itself. (...)
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  38. Steve Jones (2011). Death of the Image/The Image of Death: Temporality , Torture and Transience in Yuuri Sunohara and Masami Akita's Harakiri Cycle. Journal of Japanese and Korean Cinema 3 (1):163-177.
    Sunohara Yuuri and Akita Masami’s series of six seppuku films (1990) are solely constituted by images of fictionalized death, revolving around the prolonged self-torture of a lone figure committing harakiri. I contend that the protagonist’s auto-immolation mirrors a formal death, each frame ‘killing’ the moment it represents. My analysis aims to explore how the solipsistic nature of selfhood is appositely symbolized by the isolation of the on-screen figures and the insistence with which the six films repeat the same scenario of (...)
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  39. Steve Jones (2011). Dying to Be Seen: Snuff-Fiction’s Problematic Fantasises of ‘Reality’. Scope 19.
    The mythic Snuff film has remained a persistent cinematic rumour since the mid-1970s. The discourses that surround Snuff are preoccupied by two factors: (a) the formal aesthetic, and (b) their alleged role as a kind of titillating pornography. Although critical narratives have been established to account for the subgenre, little has been done to unpick a recent wave of hardcore horror pseudo-Snuff texts, and the cultural climate they enter into. Exploring the August Underground trilogy (2001-2007) in particular, I investigate how (...)
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  40. Steve Jones (2011). Dying to Be Seen: Snuff-Fiction’s Problematic Fantasises of ‘Reality’. Scope 19.
    The mythic Snuff film has remained a persistent cinematic rumour since the mid-1970s. The discourses that surround Snuff are preoccupied by two factors: (a) the formal aesthetic, and (b) their alleged role as a kind of titillating pornography. Although critical narratives have been established to account for the subgenre, little has been done to unpick a recent wave of hardcore horror pseudo-Snuff texts, and the cultural climate they enter into. Exploring the August Underground trilogy (2001-2007) in particular, I investigate how (...)
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  41. Steve Jones (2011). Dying to Be Seen: Snuff-Fiction’s Problematic Fantasises of ‘Reality’. Scope 19:1-20.
    The mythic Snuff film has remained a persistent cinematic rumour since the mid-1970s. The discourses that surround Snuff are preoccupied by two factors: (a) the formal aesthetic, and (b) their alleged role as a kind of titillating pornography. Although critical narratives have been established to account for the subgenre, little has been done to unpick a recent wave of hardcore horror pseudo-Snuff texts, and the cultural climate they enter into. Exploring the August Underground trilogy (2001-2007) in particular, I investigate how (...)
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  42. Steve Jones (2011). The Pure Moment of Murder: The Symbolic Function of Bodily Interactions in Horror Film. Projections 6 (2):96-114.
    Both the slasher movie and its more recent counterpart the "torture porn" film centralize graphic depictions of violence. This article inspects the nature of these portrayals by examining a motif commonly found in the cinema of homicide, dubbed here the "pure moment of murder": that is, the moment in which two characters’ bodies adjoin onscreen in an instance of graphic violence. By exploring a number of these incidents (and their various modes of representation) in American horror films ranging from Psycho (...)
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  43. Steve Jones (2010). The Technologies of Isolation. Japanese Studies 30 (2):185-198.
    In this investigation of the Japanese film Kairo, I contemplate how the horrors present in the film relate to the issue of self, by examining a number of interlocking motifs. These include thematic foci on disease and technology which are more intimately and inwardly focused that the film's conclusion first appears to suggest. The true horror here, I argue, is ontological: centred on the self and its divorcing from the exterior world, especially founded in an increased use of and reliance (...)
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  44. Steve Jones (2010). 'Time is Wasting': Con/Sequence and S/Pace in the Saw Series. Horror Studies 1 (2):225-239.
    Horror film sequels have not received as much serious critical attention as they deserve – this is especially true of the Saw franchise, which has suffered a general dismissal under the derogatory banner ‘Torture Porn’. In this article I use detailed textual analysis of the Saw series to expound how film sequels employ and complicate expected temporal and spatial relations – in particular, I investigate how the Saw sequels tie space and time into their narrative, methodological and moral sensibilities. Far (...)
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  45. Steve Jones (2010). ‘Implied…or Implode?’: The Simpsons' Carnivalesque Treehouse of Horror Specials. Animation 18.
    Since 1990, The Simpsons’ annual “Treehouse of Horror” episodes have constituted a production sub-context within the series, having their own conventions and historical trajectory. These specials incorporate horror plots and devices, as well as general references to science fiction, into the series’ base in situation comedy. The Halloween specials disrupt the series usual family-oriented sitcom structure, dissolving the ideological balances that stabilise that society. By depicting the Family and community in extreme circumstances, in seeing the horror of ‘how things could (...)
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  46. Steve Jones & Shaka McGlotten (2014). Zombie Sex. In Steve Jones & Shaka McGlotten (eds.), Zombies and Sexuality: Essays on Desire and the Living Dead. McFarland 1-18.
    Since the early 2000s, zombies have become an increasingly significant presence in popular culture. Zombies are social monsters, epitomizing aspects of social horror. What is at once central and yet strangely absent from current debates about zombies is any detailed consideration of sex and sexuality. This oversight is startling, not least since sex is arguably the most intimate form of social engagement, and is a profound aspect of human social identity. What makes the omission even more remarkable is how appositely (...)
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  47. Steve Jones & Sharif Mowlabocus (2009). ""Hard Times and Rough Rides: The Legal and Ethical Impossibilities of Researching "'Shock"'Pornographies. Sexualities 12 (5):613--628.
    This article explores the various ethical and legal limitations faced by researchers studying extreme or ‘ shock’ pornographies, beginning with generic and disciplinary contexts, and focusing specifically upon the assumption that textual analysis unproblematically justifies certain pornographies, while legal contexts utilize a prohibitive gaze. Are our academic freedoms of speech endangered by legislations that restrict our access to non-mainstream images, forcing them further into taboo locales? If so, is the ideological normalization of sexuality inextricable from our research methodologies? Simultaneously, can (...)
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  48. László Kajtár (2015). Herman, David. Storytelling and the Sciences of Mind. The MIT Press, 2013, Xiv + 428 Pp., $45.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (3):367-369.
  49. Shawn E. Klein (2012). Harry Potter and Humanity: Choices, Love, and Death. Reason Papers 34 (1):33-41.
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  50. Joel Krueger (2015). At Home in and Beyond Our Skin: Posthuman Embodiment in Film and Television. In Hauskeller Michael, Carbonell Curtis D. & Philbeck Thomas D. (eds.), Handbook of Posthumanism in Film and Television. Palgrave Macmillan 172-181.
    Film and television portrayals of posthuman cyborgs melding biology and technology, simultaneously “animal and machine” abound. Most of us immediately think of iconic characters like Arnold Schwarzenegger’s relentless cyborg assassin in the Terminator series or Peter Weller’s crime-fighting cyborg police officer in Robocop (1987). Or perhaps we recall the many cyborgs populating the Dr. Who, Star Trek, and Star Wars television series and films—including Darth Vader, surely the most famous cinematic cyborg of all time. But lesser-known explorations of cybernetic embodiment (...)
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