Related categories
Subcategories:
188 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 188
Material to categorize
  1. Asolo Adeyeye Adewole (2007). Corporate Social Responsibility, Self-Regulation, and the Problems of Unethical Business Practices in Africa. International Corporate Responsibility Series 3:69-79.
    The paper examines the issue of corporate social responsibility (CSR) against the backdrop of its self-regulatory posture. Using the African experience as a case study, the paper observes that the activities of multinationals show very clearly that they are grossly irresponsible despite their professed self-regulation. Instead, the multinationals have created an image of terror due to their deep-rooted involvements in human rights abuses, environmental degradation, tax evasion, bribery, market manipulation, and other forms of unethical practices, notwithstanding their so-called self-regulation. The (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. James J. Angel & Douglas McCabe (2013). Ethical Standards for Stockbrokers: Fiduciary or Suitability? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (1):183-193.
    What are the ethical obligations of the sellers of financial products to their customers? Stockbrokers in the U.S. have a legal and ethical requirement to recommend only “suitable” investments to their customers. This is a fairly weak standard. Currently, there are proposals to raise the standard to a fiduciary one in which the recommendations would have to be in the best interests of the clients. Brokers sell solutions to financial problems. Similar to an auto mechanic or a doctor, the product (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. James J. Angel & Douglas McCabe (2013). Fairness in Financial Markets: The Case of High Frequency Trading. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (4):585-595.
    Recent concern over “high frequency trading” (HFT) has called into question the fairness of the practice. What does it mean for a financial market to be “fair”? We first examine how high frequency trading is actually used. High frequency traders often implement traditional beneficial strategies such as market making and arbitrage, although computers can also be used for manipulative strategies as well. We then examine different notions of fairness. Procedural fairness can be viewed from the perspective of equal opportunity, in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Barbara Arel, Cathy A. Beaudoin & Anna M. Cianci (2012). The Impact of Ethical Leadership, the Internal Audit Function, and Moral Intensity on a Financial Reporting Decision. Journal of Business Ethics 109 (3):351-366.
    Two elements of corporate governance—the strength of ethical executive leadership and the internal audit function (IAF hereafter)—provide guidance to accounting managers making decisions involving uncertainty. We examine the joint effect of these two factors, manipulated at two levels (strong, weak), in an experiment in which accounting professionals decide whether to book a questionable journal entry (i.e., a journal entry for which a reasonable business case can be made but there is no supporting documentation). We find that ethical leadership and the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. John Raymond Boatright (2008). Ethics in Finance. Blackwell Pub..
    This second edition of the ground-breaking Ethics in Finance, is an up-to-date, valuable addition to the emerging field of finance ethics. Citing examples of the scandals that have shaken public confidence in the ethics of Wall Street, this text explains the importance of ethics the operation of financial institutions and in the personal conduct of finance professionals. Focuses on practical issues that confront finance professionals and policy makers Now includes discussion of issues in mutual funds and financial engineering, the independence (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Kais Bouslah, Bouchra M.’Zali, Marie-France Turcotte & Maher Kooli (2010). The Impact of Forest Certification on Firm Financial Performance in Canada and the U.S. Journal of Business Ethics 96 (4):551 - 572.
    The purpose of this article is to examine empirically the impact of environmental certification on firm financial performance (FP). The main question is whether there is a "green premium" for certified firms, and, if so, for what kind of certification. We analyze the short-run and the long-run stock price performance using an event-study methodology on a sample of Canadian and U.S. firms. The results of short-run event abnormal returns indicate that forest certification does not have any significant impact on firm (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Johan J. Graafland & Bert W. Ven (2011). The Credit Crisis and the Moral Responsibility of Professionals in Finance. Journal of Business Ethics 103 (4):605-619.
    Starting from MacIntyre’s virtue ethics, we investigate several codes of conduct of banks to identify the type of virtues that are needed to realize their mission. Based on this analysis, we define three core virtues: honesty, due care, and accuracy. We compare and contrast these codes of conduct with the actual behavior of banks that led to the credit crisis and find that in some cases banks did not behave according to the moral standards they set themselves. However, although banks (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
Corporate Governance
  1. Avshalom M. Adam & Mark S. Schwartz (2009). Corporate Governance, Ethics, and the Backdating of Stock Options. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):225 - 237.
    Backdating of stock options is an example of an agency problem. It has emerged despite all the measures (i.e., new regulations and additional corporate governance mechanisms) aimed at addressing such problems? Beyond such negative controlling measures, a more positive empowering approach based on ethics may also be necessary. What ethical measures need to be taken to address the agency problem? What values and norms should guide the board of directors in protecting the shareholders' interests? To examine these issues, we first (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Ruth Bender & Lance Moir (2006). Does 'Best Practice' in Setting Executive Pay in the UK Encourage 'Good' Behaviour? Journal of Business Ethics 67 (1):75 - 91.
    We examine how UK listed companies set executive pay, reviewing the implications of following best practice in corporate governance and examining how this can conflict with what shareholders and other stakeholders might perceive as good behaviour. We do this by considering current governance regulation in the light of interviews with protagonists in the debate, setting out the dilemmas faced by remuneration-setters, and showing how the processes they follow can lead to ethical conflicts.Current ‘best’ practice governing executive pay includes the use (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Colin Boyd (1996). Ethics and Corporate Governance: The Issues Raised by the Cadbury Report in the United Kingdom. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 15 (2):167 - 182.
    In the late 1980s there was a series of sensational business scandals in the United Kingdom. There was particular public outrage at the plundering of pension funds by Robert Maxwell, at the failure of auditors to expose the impending bankruptcy of the Bank of Credit and Commerce International, and at the apparently undeserved high pay raises received by senior business executives. The City of London responded by creating a special committee to examine the financial aspects of corporate governance. This paper (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Alexander Brink (2010). Enlightened Corporate Governance: Specific Investments by Employees as Legitimation for Residual Claims. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 93 (4):641 - 651.
    While much has been written on specificity (e.g., in texts on new institutional economics, agency theory, and team production theory), there are still some insights to be learnt by business ethicists. This article approaches the issue from the perspective of team production, and will propose a new form of corporate governance: enlightened corporate governance, which takes into consideration the specific investments of employees. The article argues that, in addition to shareholders, employees also bear a residual risk which arises due to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Andrew J. Felo (2001). Ethics Programs, Board Involvement, and Potential Conflicts of Interest in Corporate Governance. Journal of Business Ethics 32 (3):205 - 218.
    Board composition, insider participation on compensation committees, and director compensation practices can potentially cause conflicts of interest between directors and shareholders. If these corporate governance structures result in situations where actions beneficial to directors do not also benefit shareholders, then shareholders may suffer.Corporate ethics programs usually address conflicts of interest that may arise in the firm''s activities. Some boards of directors take active roles in their firms'' ethics programs by actively overseeing the programs. This paper empirically examines the relationship between (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Clinton Free & Vaughan Radcliffe (2009). Accountability in Crisis: The Sponsorship Scandal and the Office of the Comptroller General in Canada. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 84 (2):189 - 208.
    For much of the last 50 years, a key platform animating public sector reform in Canada and elsewhere has been that efficiency and effectiveness can be achieved by adapting private sector financial management methods and practices. We argue that the recent re-establishment of the Office of the Comptroller General (OCG) of Canada represents a key element of a program of strengthening financial accountability that has emerged within the Canadian Federal Government. Although this program is longstanding and is associated Canada’s implementation (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Gerald E. Fryxell & Linda D. Lerner (1989). Contrasting Corporate Profiles: Women and Minority Representation in Top Management Positions. Journal of Business Ethics 8 (5):341 - 352.
    This paper investigates the characteristics of firms which have underrepresented groups in top management positions and those which do not. It is argued that profiles of these characteristics will be different for firms with minorities vs. women and that these profiles will be different depending on whether representation is by board membership or through officerships. A discriminant analysis found both similarities and differences in variables that were associated with these different forms of representation. It was found, for example, that size (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Thomas A. Hemphill (2007). The US Securities and Exchange Commission and Shareholder Director Nominations: Paving the Way for Special Interest Directors? International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 3 (1):19-32.
    The US Securities and Exchange Commission recently proposed rules relating to shareholder (independent) director nominations to publicly-traded companies. While shareholder groups, such as institutional investors, consumer groups, and shareholder activists, generally support the proxy reform, the business community, including The Business Roundtable and the US Chamber of Commerce, are critical of the proposal, arguing that it will 'open the door' to special interest directors, e.g., labour unions or other groups having a social or political agenda contrary to the economic interests (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Coral B. Ingley (2008). Company Growth and Board Attitudes to Corporate Social Responsibility. International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 4 (1):17-39.
    Companies are beginning to recognise the concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) as presenting a new business model and an opportunity for building innovative forms of competitive advantage. Boards are instrumental in shaping and overseeing such strategies and active engagement around what it means to be a responsible and responsive enterprise can strengthen the Board's potential as a strategic influence on long-term value creation. Yet many companies align with Friedman's contention that adopting and practising CSR is a distraction from their (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Hoje Jo & Maretno A. Harjoto (2012). The Causal Effect of Corporate Governance on Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 106 (1):53-72.
    In this article, we examine the empirical association between corporate governance (CG) and corporate social responsibility (CSR) engagement by investigating their causal effects. Employing a large and extensive US sample, we first find that while the lag of CSR does not affect CG variables, the lag of CG variables positively affects firms’ CSR engagement, after controlling for various firm characteristics. In addition, to examine the relative importance of stakeholder theory and agency theory regarding the associations among CSR, CG, and corporate (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Nada Kakabadse & Andrew Kakabadse (2004). Pension Funds Governance: An Overview of the Role of Trustees. International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 1 (1):3-26.
    The Myners Review of the pension fund industry has started a debate on pension fund governance and the fund industry itself. This paper provides a review of pension fund trusteeship in the UK, its role, operating models and impact. It argues that deficiencies in the systems uncovered by the Myners Review stem from a tension between conflicting philosophies - that of trusteeship built on stakeholder principles but operating in shareholder markets.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Robert Kolb & Jeffrey Moriarty (2011). Dialogue - CEO Compensation. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):679-691.
    Must CEOs Be Saints? Contra Moriarty on CEO Abstemiousness by Robert KolbIn this journal, Jeffrey Moriarty argued that CEOs must refuse to accept compensation above the minimum compensation that will induce them to accept and per­form their jobs. Acting otherwise, he maintains, violates the CEO’s fiduciary duty, even for a CEO new to the firm. I argue that Moriarty’s conclusion rests on a failure to adequately distinguish when a person acts as a fiduciary from when she acts on her own (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Jyoti D. Mahadeo, Teerooven Soobaroyen & Vanisha Oogarah Hanuman (2012). Board Composition and Financial Performance: Uncovering the Effects of Diversity in an Emerging Economy. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 105 (3):375-388.
    We examine the key elements of board diversity (or heterogeneity) amongst listed companies operating in an emerging economy (Mauritius) and the extent to which these influence financial performance. Specifically, we ask whether there is evidence of tangible benefits in pursuing a strategy of board diversity in terms of gender-, age-, educational background and independence in a corporate context which has long been dominated by family-led and ‘closed’ boardrooms. In light of recent corporate governance developments which appear to foster greater diversity, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Lois Schafer Mahoney & Linda Thorn (2006). An Examination of the Structure of Executive Compensation and Corporate Social Responsibility: A Canadian Investigation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 69 (2):149 - 162.
    We explore the extent to which Boards use executive compensation to incite firms to act in accordance with social and environmental objectives (e.g., Johnson, R. and D. Greening: 1999, Academy of Management Journal 42(5), 564-578; Kane, E. J.: 2002, Journal of Banking and Finance 26, 1919-1933.). We examine the association between executive compensation and corporate social responsibility (CSR) for 77 Canadian firms using three key components of executives' compensation structure: salary, bonus, and stock options. Similar to prior research (McGuire, J., (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Ella Mae Matsumura & Jae Yong Shin (2005). Corporate Governance Reform and CEO Compensation: Intended and Unintended Consequences. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 62 (2):101 - 113.
    Recent scandals allegedly linked to CEO compensation have brought executive compensation and perquisites to the forefront of debate about constraining executive compensation and reforming the associated corporate governance structure. We briefly describe the structure of executive compensation, and the agency theory framework that has commonly been used to conceptualize executives acting on behalf of shareholders. We detail some criticisms of executive compensation and associated ethical issues, and then discuss what previous research suggests are likely intended and unintended consequences of some (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Thaddeus Metz & Johannes Hirata (2013). Good Governance. In Ilona Boniwell & Dasho Karma Ura (eds.), Report on Wellbeing & Happiness. Centre for Bhutan Studies.
    A critical discussion of the concept of good governance as it figures into Bhutan's Gross National Happiness project as part of a report to the UN General Assembly.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Armand Picou & Michael J. Rubach (2006). Does Good Governance Matter to Institutional Investors? Evidence From the Enactment of Corporate Governance Guidelines. Journal of Business Ethics 65 (1):55 - 67.
    Corporate governance guidelines are a mechanism that a firm can enact which should reduce agency costs and better align the interests of boards and the suppliers of capital. This study examines stock price reactions primarily attributable to institutional investors occurring when corporations announce the enactment of corporate governance guidelines. A final sample of 77 firms was derived from the first announcement of corporate governance guidelines exclusive to the SEC-EDGAR database. The results indicate that good governance does matter. Firms that announced (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Joakim Sandberg (2013). (Re-)Interpreting Fiduciary Duty to Justify Socially Responsible Investment for Pension Funds? Corporate Governance 21 (5):436-446.
    A critical issue for the future growth of socially responsible investment (SRI) is to what extent institutional investors such as pension funds can be persuaded to engage in it. This paper considers attempts at justifying such engagement stemming from a range of (re-)interpretations of the fiduciary duties owed by pension funds to their beneficiaries, and thereby develops a hypothesis concerning the most effective political or legal remedy. Previous commentary suggests that fiduciary duty either already mandates SRI for pension funds, or (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Magdalena Smith, DOES KUTZ's THEORY OF JOINT ACTION ATTRIBUTE RESPONSIBILITY TO SHAREOWNERS?
    In this paper I argue that Christopher Kutz misapplies his theory of joint action when he attributes shareowners responsibilities on the basis of their intentional participation in the corporations in which they invest. Instead I propose that his theory of joint action should be used to attribute shareowners responsibilities on the basis of their intentional participation in the stock market. If shareholders’ accountability is grounded in their intentional participation in the stock market, then shareholders cannot take responsibility for corporation’s individual (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Lorne N. Switzer & Catherine Kelly (2006). Corporate Governance Mechanisms and the Performance of Small-Cap Firms in Canada. International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 2 (s 3-4):294-328.
    Identifying corporate governance mechanisms to improve firm performance has been at the forefront of policy discussion and research in recent years. Existing research in this area focuses on large-capitalisation firms, and has not provided much insight on smaller firms. This paper tests for the optimality of deployment of governance mechanisms for Canadian small-cap firms by estimating a simultaneous equation system that links four control mechanisms to firm performance, using recent data. The results confirm simultaneity between several governance mechanisms and Canadian (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
Ethics of Executive Remuneration
  1. Avinash Arya & Huey-Lian Sun (2004). Stock Option Repricing: Heads I Win, Tails You Lose. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 50 (4):297-312.
    Recent scandals at Enron, WorldCom and Global Crossing have put the ethical spotlight on corporate malfeasance as never before. However, these are the situations in which management knew that they made the wrong choice. As professor Joseph Badaracco of Harvard Business School points out, the real ethical dilemmas arise when people must choose between right and right — where both choices can be justified, yet one must be chosen over the other. Whether or not to reprice stock options represents one (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Allan S. Ashley & Simon S. M. Yang (2004). Executive Compensation and Earnings Persistence. Journal of Business Ethics 50 (4):369-382.
    Governing boards utilize executive compensation contracts in an attempt to align executive actions with corporate goals. The objective is to ensure that executive performance provides value to the organization in terms of successful outcomes. A key performance criteria typically specified in CEO compensation contracts is earnings targets. However, using earnings as a performance evaluation may be problematic because some firms exhibit robust and sustained earnings over time (high earnings persistence), and other firms, such as high growth oriented firms, exhibit weak (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Ruth Bender & Lance Moir (2006). Does 'Best Practice' in Setting Executive Pay in the UK Encourage 'Good' Behaviour? Journal of Business Ethics 67 (1):75 - 91.
    We examine how UK listed companies set executive pay, reviewing the implications of following best practice in corporate governance and examining how this can conflict with what shareholders and other stakeholders might perceive as good behaviour. We do this by considering current governance regulation in the light of interviews with protagonists in the debate, setting out the dilemmas faced by remuneration-setters, and showing how the processes they follow can lead to ethical conflicts.Current ‘best’ practice governing executive pay includes the use (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. John R. Boatright (2010). Executive Compensation : Unjust or Just Right? In George G. Brenkert & Tom L. Beauchamp (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Business Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Virginia Bodolica, Michel Magnan & Martin Spraggon (2007). Merger and Acquisition Related Determinants of Executive Compensation Arrangements' Adoption. International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 3 (4):407-429.
    Previous research has investigated the links between Mergers and Acquisitions (M&As) and the monetary magnitude of executive compensation, but failed to inquire how the adoption of specific attributes of compensation contacts relates to M&A activities. We address this gap in the literature by examining the impacts of some M&A characteristics and acquirers' features on the adoption of executive compensation protection provisions and new Long-Term Incentive Plans (LTIPs). The study adopts a longitudinal design before after M&A deals for 80 Canadian acquiring (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. James A. Brander (2006). The Effect of Ethical Fund Portfolio Inclusion on Executive Compensation. Journal of Business Ethics 69 (4):317 - 329.
    This paper divides firms in the Standard and Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) into two groups based on inclusion in or exclusion from the Domini Social Index (DSI). Inclusion in the DSI is interpreted as a positive indicator of ethical status. Using data for the 1992–2003 period, I provide evidence that chief executive officer (CEO) compensation, other executive compensation, and director compensation tend to be lower in DSI firms than in other firms in the S&P 500. This applies to the unconditional (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Ye Cai, Hoje Jo & Carrie Pan (2011). Vice or Virtue? The Impact of Corporate Social Responsibility on Executive Compensation. Journal of Business Ethics 104 (2):159-173.
    We empirically examine the impact of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on CEO compensation using a large sample of the US firms from 1996 to 2010. We develop and test two hypotheses, the overinvestment hypothesis based on agency theory and the conflict–resolution hypothesis based on stakeholder theory. We find that the lag of CSR adversely affects both total compensation and cash compensation, after controlling for various firm and board characteristics. Our estimates show that an interquartile increase in CSR is followed by (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Linda L. Carr & Moosa Valinezhad (1994). The Role of Ethics in Executive Compensation: Toward a Contractarian Interpretation of the Neoclassical Theory of Managerial Renumeration. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 13 (2):81 - 93.
    The topic of Chief Executive Officer (CEO) compensation has been a focus of interest for many years. The purpose of this article is to explore the ethical dimensions of various generally accepted theories of CEO renumeration. We argue that a contractarian approach, based on the Kantian ethical framework, can be used to augment the existing contingent pay models.While the neoclassical economic model of the firm views the maximization of the shareholders'' wealth as the sole responsibility of top management, a contractarian (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Marjorie Chan (2009). Editorial: “Executive Compensation”. Open Ethics Journal 3 (2):40-41.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Marjorie Chan (2009). Hot Topic: “Executive Compensation”. Open Ethics Journal 3 (1):40-90.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Marjorie Chan (2009). How to Rein in Executive Compensation? Open Ethics Journal 3 (2):81-90.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Craig Cox & Sally Power (1991). Executive Pay: How Much Is Too Much? Business Ethics; The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility 5 (5):18-24.
    What's wrong with high executive pay? Beyond envy, is some issue of justice or fairness at stake? And what can anyone do about it? (A lot, as it turns out.).
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. John Dobson (2011). A Moral and Economic Defense of Executive Compensation. Business and Professional Ethics Journal 30 (1-2):59-70.
    A great deal has been written in recent years about the justification, if any, for the current levels of executive compensation. The folk consensus is that the current levels of executive compensation are unjustifiably high from both a moral and an economic perspective. In the case of the former, the compensation level is unfair and unjust. And in the case of the latter, the compensation level is not in the broader interests of other stakeholders or of firm-value maximization.In this paper (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Sydney Finkelstein (2009). Why is Industry Related to CEO Compensation?: A Managerial Discretion Explanation. Open Ethics Journal 3 (2):42-56.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Julian Friedland (2010). A Fair Wage? Capping Executive Compensation. Journal of Business Ethics Education 7:129-139.
    This case study highlights some of the latest research on setting executive compensation at ethical levels. The board of directors of Spade’s, a mid-size U.S. hardware chain, considers altering the pay package of its incoming CEO to best align his interests with those of shareholders and stakeholders. Students are invited to consider various options on current trends, which seem attractive and convincing on the surface, but might present certain risks over the longer term. Five compensation components are analyzed, namely, salary (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Jared D. Harris (2009). What's Wrong with Executive Compensation? Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):147 - 156.
    I broadly explore the question by examining several common criticisms of CEO pay through both philosophical and empirical lenses. While some criticisms appear to be unfounded, the analysis shows not only that current compensation practices are problematic both from the standpoint of distributive justice and fairness, but also that incentive pay ultimately exacerbates the very agency problem it is purported to solve.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Maria Joutsenvirta (2013). Executive Pay and Legitimacy: Changing Discursive Battles Over the Morality of Excessive Manager Compensation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 116 (3):459-477.
    How is the (il)legitimacy of manager compensation constructed in social interaction? This study investigated discursive processes through which heavily contested executive pay schemes of the Finnish energy giant Fortum were constructed as (il)legitimate in public during 2005–2009. The critical discursive analysis of media texts identified five legitimation strategies through which politicians, journalists, and other social actors contested these schemes and, at the same time, constructed subject positions for managers, politicians, and citizens. The comparison of two debate periods surrounding the 2007–2008 (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Kiridaran Kanagaretnam, Gerald J. Lobo & Emad Mohammad (2009). Are Stock Options Grants to Ceos of Stagnant Firms Fair and Justified? Journal of Business Ethics 90 (1):137 - 155.
    Prior research has examined several ethical questions related to executive compensation. The issues that have received most attention are whether executives' pay is fair and justified by performance. Since more recent studies show that stock options grants constitute the single largest component in executive compensation, we examine the relations of these grants to economic determinants and corporate governance for firms in the stagnant stage of their lifecycle. We find that, on average, stock options grants comprise a significant portion of annual (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Robert Kolb & Jeffrey Moriarty (2011). Dialogue - CEO Compensation. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):679-691.
    Must CEOs Be Saints? Contra Moriarty on CEO Abstemiousness by Robert KolbIn this journal, Jeffrey Moriarty argued that CEOs must refuse to accept compensation above the minimum compensation that will induce them to accept and per­form their jobs. Acting otherwise, he maintains, violates the CEO’s fiduciary duty, even for a CEO new to the firm. I argue that Moriarty’s conclusion rests on a failure to adequately distinguish when a person acts as a fiduciary from when she acts on her own (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Dale Kurschner (1995). Kodak's Executive Pay Plan. Business Ethics 9 (5):47-47.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Lois Schafer Mahoney & Linda Thorn (2006). An Examination of the Structure of Executive Compensation and Corporate Social Responsibility: A Canadian Investigation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 69 (2):149 - 162.
    We explore the extent to which Boards use executive compensation to incite firms to act in accordance with social and environmental objectives (e.g., Johnson, R. and D. Greening: 1999, Academy of Management Journal 42(5), 564-578; Kane, E. J.: 2002, Journal of Banking and Finance 26, 1919-1933.). We examine the association between executive compensation and corporate social responsibility (CSR) for 77 Canadian firms using three key components of executives' compensation structure: salary, bonus, and stock options. Similar to prior research (McGuire, J., (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Ella Mae Matsumura & Jae Yong Shin (2005). Corporate Governance Reform and CEO Compensation: Intended and Unintended Consequences. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 62 (2):101 - 113.
    Recent scandals allegedly linked to CEO compensation have brought executive compensation and perquisites to the forefront of debate about constraining executive compensation and reforming the associated corporate governance structure. We briefly describe the structure of executive compensation, and the agency theory framework that has commonly been used to conceptualize executives acting on behalf of shareholders. We detail some criticisms of executive compensation and associated ethical issues, and then discuss what previous research suggests are likely intended and unintended consequences of some (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. John J. McCall (2004). Assessing American Executive Compensation: A Cautionary Tale for Europeans. Business Ethics 13 (4):243-254.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 188