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  1. Asolo Adeyeye Adewole (2007). Corporate Social Responsibility, Self-Regulation, and the Problems of Unethical Business Practices in Africa. International Corporate Responsibility Series 3:69-79.
    The paper examines the issue of corporate social responsibility (CSR) against the backdrop of its self-regulatory posture. Using the African experience as a case study, the paper observes that the activities of multinationals show very clearly that they are grossly irresponsible despite their professed self-regulation. Instead, the multinationals have created an image of terror due to their deep-rooted involvements in human rights abuses, environmental degradation, tax evasion, bribery, market manipulation, and other forms of unethical practices, notwithstanding their so-called self-regulation. The (...)
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  2. Adam Adrien-Kirby, Stephen Brammer & Andrew Millington (2008). The Effect of Isomorphic Pressure on Socially and Environmentally Responsible Procurement in the United Kingdom. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 19:93-101.
    This study assesses the impact had by institutional isomorphic pressures in the organisational fields of 185 businesses operating within the United Kingdom. The emphasis throughout is on how external institutions affect the socially and environmentally responsible aspects of an organization’s purchasing practice. Factor analyses and a linear regression model are employed to test the influence of these pressures. Initial findings suggest that what other industry participants are doing in this area is not as important in affecting the procurement practice of (...)
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  3. Boniface Ahunwan (2002). Corporate Governance in Nigeria. Journal of Business Ethics 37 (3):269 - 287.
    In recent years, international economic pressures have induced Nigeria to adopt a program of economic liberalization and deregulation. Advocates of the reforms tout their potential not only for generating greater economic growth, but also for contributing to more responsible corporate governance. Sceptics abound. This paper provides an account of the nature of corporate governance in Nigeria and investigates the prospects for recent reforms contributing to more responsible governance and development.
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  4. Gwendolyn Yvonne Alexis (2009). Legislative Exess or Regulatory Brilliance? Corporate Governance After SARBOX. In Julian Friedland (ed.), Doing Well and Good: The Human Face of the New Capitalism.
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  5. Norli Ali (2009). Stock Overreaction and Financial Bubbles in the Malaysian Stock Market. In David Papineau (ed.), Philosophy. Oxford University Press
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  6. Kristian Alm (2007). Challenges to Investment Ethics in the Norwegian Petroleum Fund: A Newspaper Debate. Philosophica 80 (2):21-43.
    In this article I will describe the main elements of the Norwegian press’s moral confrontation with the Government Pension Fund’s ethical investment management when it was in an introductory phase in early 2005, with special emphasis on one newspaper, Stavanger Aftenblad. The press criticized the fund’s fresh investment profile and intended exclusionary practice before it had really started in earnest. Then I will focus on how the press’s unilateral criticism of the fund’s investment practice at the time overshadowed a discussion (...)
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  7. José E. Alvarez (2010). The Once and Future Foreign Investment Regime. In Mahnoush Arsanjani, Jacob Cogan, Robert Sloane & Siegfried Wiessner (eds.), Looking to the Future. Nijhoff
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  8. Kenneth Amaeshi (2010). Different Markets for Different Folks: Exploring the Challenges of Mainstreaming Responsible Investment Practices. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (1):41 - 56.
    The link between Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) and financial performance has continued to generate mixed and inconclusive results. Most studies in this area seem to assume that corporate social and financial performance share the same underpinning logic. Drawing from a qualitative analysis of practitioners' accounts of the challenges of mainstreaming the market for responsible investments, as part of the broader CSR agenda, this article re-examines this taken-for-granted assumption in the extant literature, and reaches the conclusion that CSR, as a complex (...)
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  9. James J. Angel & Douglas McCabe (2013). Ethical Standards for Stockbrokers: Fiduciary or Suitability? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (1):183-193.
    What are the ethical obligations of the sellers of financial products to their customers? Stockbrokers in the U.S. have a legal and ethical requirement to recommend only “suitable” investments to their customers. This is a fairly weak standard. Currently, there are proposals to raise the standard to a fiduciary one in which the recommendations would have to be in the best interests of the clients. Brokers sell solutions to financial problems. Similar to an auto mechanic or a doctor, the product (...)
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  10. James J. Angel & Douglas McCabe (2013). Fairness in Financial Markets: The Case of High Frequency Trading. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (4):585-595.
    Recent concern over “high frequency trading” (HFT) has called into question the fairness of the practice. What does it mean for a financial market to be “fair”? We first examine how high frequency trading is actually used. High frequency traders often implement traditional beneficial strategies such as market making and arbitrage, although computers can also be used for manipulative strategies as well. We then examine different notions of fairness. Procedural fairness can be viewed from the perspective of equal opportunity, in (...)
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  11. Hans Apel (forthcoming). Growth Trends in Productivity, Consumption, and Investment. Social Research.
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  12. Coren L. Apicella & Frank W. Marlowe (2007). Men's Reproductive Investment Decisions. Human Nature 18 (1):22-34.
    Using questionnaire data completed by 170 men, we examine variation in paternal investment in relation to the trade-off between mating and parenting. We found that as men’s self-perceived mate value increases, so does their mating effort, and in turn, as mating effort increases, paternal investment decreases. This study also simultaneously examined the influence on parental investment of men’s mating effort, men’s perception of their mates’ fidelity, and their perceived resemblance to their offspring. All predicted investment. The predictors of investment are (...)
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  13. Barbara Arel, Cathy A. Beaudoin & Anna M. Cianci (2012). The Impact of Ethical Leadership, the Internal Audit Function, and Moral Intensity on a Financial Reporting Decision. Journal of Business Ethics 109 (3):351-366.
    Two elements of corporate governance—the strength of ethical executive leadership and the internal audit function (IAF hereafter)—provide guidance to accounting managers making decisions involving uncertainty. We examine the joint effect of these two factors, manipulated at two levels (strong, weak), in an experiment in which accounting professionals decide whether to book a questionable journal entry (i.e., a journal entry for which a reasonable business case can be made but there is no supporting documentation). We find that ethical leadership and the (...)
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  14. Felipe Arias Fogliano de Souza Cunha & Carlos Patricio Samanez (2013). Performance Analysis of Sustainable Investments in the Brazilian Stock Market: A Study About the Corporate Sustainability Index (ISE). [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):19-36.
    In this article, we studied the Corporate Sustainability Index (ISE) of the Brazilian Mercantile, Futures and Stock Exchange (BM&FBOVESPA), with the main objective of analyzing the performance of sustainable investments in the Brazilian stock market, during the period from December 2005 to December 2010. To achieve this aim, we characterized ISE portfolios and we compared its performance with the IBOVESPA (representing the market portfolio) and other BM&FBOVESPA sectoral indices. In the performance comparison, we used level of liquidity, return and risk (...)
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  15. Diane-Laure Arjaliès (2010). A Social Movement Perspective on Finance: How Socially Responsible Investment Mattered. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 92 (1):57 - 78.
    This study discusses how social movements can influence economic systems. Employing a political-cultural approach to markets, it purports that 'compromise movements' can help change existing institutions by proposing new ones. This study argues in favor of the role of social movements in reforming economic institutions. More precisely, Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) movements can help bring SRI concerns into financial institutions. A study of how the French SRI movement has been able to change entrenched institutional logics of the French asset management (...)
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  16. W. H. G. Armytage (1978). The Stock Question. British Journal of Educational Studies 26 (2):119 - 136.
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  17. J. Arnoldi (forthcoming). Computer Algorithms, Market Manipulation and the Institutionalization of High Frequency Trading. Theory, Culture and Society.
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  18. E. Eugene Arthur (1987). The Ethics of Corporate Governance. Journal of Business Ethics 6 (1):59 - 70.
    The failure of the critics of corporate governance to agree on what should be done to improve the governance process can, in most cases, be traced to a different understanding of the role of corporate directors in that process. This article analyzes and contrasts the obligations of directors under two legal theories, the fictional person theory and the organic theory, of the corporation. A comparison of the director's obligations under each theory indicates that the organic theory provides a better basis (...)
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  19. Andrew Askland (2009). Science and Socially Responsible Freedom. Science and Engineering Ethics 15 (3):343-349.
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  20. Michael S. Aßländer & Markus Schenkel (2011). Responsible Investment and Exclusion Criteria: A Case Study From a Catholic Private Bank. In Wim Vandekerckhove, Jos Leys, Kristian Alm, Bert Scholtens, Silvana Signori & Henry Schäfer (eds.), Responsible Investment in Times of Turmoil. Springer 135--150.
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  21. Jaakko Aspara (2009). How Do Institutional Actors in the Financial Market Assess Companies' Product Design? The Quasi-Rational Evaluative Schemes. Knowledge, Technology & Policy 22 (4):241-258.
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  22. Maria Eugenia Aubet (1995). From Trading Post to Town in the Phoenician-Punic World. Proceedings of the British Academy 86:47-65.
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  23. Darline Augustine (2012). Good Practice in Corporate Governance: Transparency, Trust, and Performance in the Microfinance Industry. Business and Society 51 (4):659-676.
    This dissertation abstract and reflection essay presents the work of Dr. Darline Augustine. The dissertation examines variance in firm performance in the microfinance industry. The investigations unfold throughout six dissertation chapters, four of which are empirical. Each chapter illustrates the complex nature of the practice of corporate governance within microfinance firms, and the relationship of transparency to performance. In particular, the dissertation illustrates the influence of firm-level transparency—a proxy for good practice in corporate governance—and positive firm performance. The chapters focus (...)
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  24. John Authers (2006). Making Good Again: German Compensation for Forced and Slave Laborers a DE GREIFF, P. In Pablo De Greiff (ed.), The Handbook of Reparations. Oxford University Press
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  25. Janine Barbot & Nicolas Dodier (2015). Victims’ Normative Repertoire of Financial Compensation: The Tainted hGH Case. Human Studies 38 (1):81-96.
    Victim compensation now plays a central role in dealing with harm. It can be brought into play by various devices: private or social insurance, the courts or special funds created for specific disasters. With each device, compensation raises complex evaluation issues: is it appropriate to use financial compensation to repair harm? Who should pay and on what basis should the compensation be awarded? What is the nature of the damage? How to evaluate it and how to value the amount of (...)
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  26. Catherine Barlow (2005). Prize Essay: Ethical Infractions: Ethical Issues in the Cinematic Screenplay of the Feature Films the Insider and Roger & Me. Business Ethics 14 (1):77–82.
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  27. Bill Baue (2006). Social Investing: Activists’ Most Wanted List. Business Ethics: The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility 20 (1):38-38.
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  28. Bill Baue (2005). Social Investing. Business Ethics 19 (3):32-32.
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  29. Hazel Beh (2004). Compensation for Research Injuries. IRB: Ethics & Human Research 27 (3):11-15.
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  30. Karen L. Benson, Marion Hutchtnson & Ashwin Sriram (2011). Governance in the Australian Superannuation Industry. Journal of Business Ethics 99 (2):183 - 200.
    In the superannuation/pension industry, ordinary investors entrust their retirement savings to the trustees of the superannuation plan. Investors rely on the trustees to ensure that ethical business and risk management practices are implemented to protect their retirement savings. Governance practices ensure the monitoring of ethical risk management (Drennan, L. T.: 2004, Journal of Business Ethics 52, 257-266). The Australian superannuation industry presents a unique scenario. Legislation requires employers to contribute a minimum of 9% of the employees wage to retirement savings. (...)
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  31. G. Bernard (1959). On Investment. Diogenes 7 (26):19-47.
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  32. R. H. Berry & F. Yeung (2013). Are Investors Willing to Sacrifice Cash for Morality? Journal of Business Ethics 117 (3):477-492.
    The paper uses questionnaire responses provided by a sample of ethical investors to investigate willingness to sacrifice ethical considerations for financial reward. The paper examines the amount of financial reward necessary to cause an ethical investor to accept a switch from good ethical performance to poor ethical performance. Conjoint analysis is used to allow quantification of the utilities derived from different combinations of ethical and financial performance. Ethical investors are shown to vary in their willingness to sacrifice ethical for financial (...)
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  33. Thomas C. Berry & Joan C. Junkus (2013). Socially Responsible Investing: An Investor Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (4):707-720.
    Given the growing importance of Socially Responsible Investing (SRI), it is surprising that there is no consensus of what the term SRI means to an investor. Further, most studies of this question rely solely on the views of investors who already invest in SRI funds. Our study surveys a unique pool of approximately 5,000 investors that contains both investors who have used SRI criteria in investment decisions and those who have not, and involves a broad array of criteria associated with (...)
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  34. Reena Bhatia & Charles Darwin (2008). Ecolabelling: Challenge of the Trading Community in Textiles and Clothing Sector. In Kuruvila Pandikattu (ed.), Dancing to Diversity: Science-Religion Dialogue in India. Serials Publications 245.
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  35. Kenneth S. Bigel (2000). The Ethical Orientation of Financial Planners Who Are Engaged in Investment Activities: A Comparison of United States Practitioners Based on Professionalization and Compensation Sources. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 28 (4):323 - 337.
    There has been much controversy concerning the benefits of the certification (professionalization) of financial planners and the merits of various compensation systems; this study examined the controversy insofar as it concerned ethical orientation rather than competence issues. The study was delimited to financial planners practicing in the United States of America. It was found that Certified Financial Planner (CFP) designees manifested higher ethical orientation scores than non-designees. Fee-based planners manifested no significantly different ethical orientation scores as compared to their counterparts. (...)
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  36. John Bigelow, Robert Pargetter & Robert Young (1990). Ii. Land, Well-Being and Compensation. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 68 (3):330 – 346.
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  37. Ernest N. Biktimirov & Don Cyr (2013). Using Inside Job to Teach Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):209-219.
    This article recommends the film Inside Job as an effective teaching tool for illustrating the ethical issues that surrounded the global financial crisis of 2008 and the subsequent economic downturn. The study discusses issues such as the revolving door, conflicts of interest, fiduciary duty, executive compensation, and financial regulation. The presentation of each ethical issue comprises suggested questions, background information, and guides to specific sections of the film. An overview of the film is provided as well.
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  38. Amelia Bilbao-Terol, Mar Arenas-Parra, Verónica Cañal-Fernández & Celia Bilbao-Terol (2013). Selection of Socially Responsible Portfolios Using Hedonic Prices. Journal of Business Ethics 115 (3):515-529.
    This paper presents a novel framework for selecting socially responsible investment (SRI) portfolios. The Hedonic Price Method (HPM) is applied to obtain an evaluation of SRI criteria that is integrated into a multi-objective mathematical programming model. The HPM breaks away from the traditional view that goods are the direct object of utility; on the contrary, it assumes that utility is derived from the properties or characteristics of the goods themselves. As far as the investment decision is concerned, we assume that (...)
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  39. Celia Bilbao‐Terol & Verónica Cañal‐Fernández (2014). The Market Valuation of Ethical Assets in Spain: An Application of the Hedonic Pricing Method. Business Ethics: A European Review 23 (4):343-363.
    The aim of this paper is to calculate the market valuation of non-financial characteristics, namely, the social responsibility criteria included in the Spanish Socially Responsible Investment Funds. The hedonic price method is applied for this purpose. This method relates the price of Socially Responsible Investment Funds with both financial and social responsibility characteristics. Because of the large number of social responsibility characteristics included in these funds, prior to application of the hedonic price method, the principal components factor analysis technique is (...)
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  40. Simon Billenness (1993). Social Investing: Human Rights: The Social Investing Issue of the 1990s. Business Ethics: The Magazine of Corporate Responsibility 7 (4):37-38.
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  41. Norbert Bischof, Compensation in the Perception of Verticality.
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  42. David Albert Bjork (2010). Regulation of Executive Compensation at Nonprofit Health Care Organizations: Coming Changes? Inquiry 47 (1):7-16.
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  43. Belen Blanco, Encarna Guillamón-Saorín & Andrés Guiral (2013). Do Non-Socially Responsible Companies Achieve Legitimacy Through Socially Responsible Actions? The Mediating Effect of Innovation. Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):67-83.
    This study investigates the effects on organization’s financial performances of, first, the extent to which the organizations are involved in controversial business activities, and second, their level of social performance. These companies can be considered non-socially responsible given the harmful nature of the activities they are involved in. Managers of these companies may still have incentives to pursue socially responsible actions if they believe that engaging on those actions will help them to achieve legitimacy and improve investors’ perception about them. (...)
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  44. John Boatright (2004). Report From the Executive Director. The Society for Business Ethics Newsletter 15 (2):1-1.
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  45. John Boatright (2004). Report From the Executive Director. The Society for Business Ethics Newsletter 15 (2):1-1.
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  46. John Boatright (2004). Report From the Executive Director. The Society for Business Ethics Newsletter 15 (2):1-1.
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  47. John R. Boatright (2011). The Financial Crisis of Our Time, by Robert W. Kolb. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):693.
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  48. John R. Boatright (2002). Ethics and Corporate Governance: Justifying the Role of Shareholder. In Norman E. Bowie (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Business Ethics. Blackwell 6--38.
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  49. John Raymond Boatright (2008). Ethics in Finance. Blackwell Pub..
    This second edition of the ground-breaking Ethics in Finance, is an up-to-date, valuable addition to the emerging field of finance ethics. Citing examples of the scandals that have shaken public confidence in the ethics of Wall Street, this text explains the importance of ethics the operation of financial institutions and in the personal conduct of finance professionals. Focuses on practical issues that confront finance professionals and policy makers Now includes discussion of issues in mutual funds and financial engineering, the independence (...)
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  50. Deirdre Boden (2000). Worlds in Action: Information, Instantaneity and Global Futures Trading. In Barbara Adam, Ulrich Beck & Joost van Loon (eds.), The Risk Society and Beyond: Critical Issues for Social Theory. Sage 183--197.
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