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  1. Marilyn McCord Adams (1991). Forgiveness. Faith and Philosophy 8 (3):277-304.
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  2. R. Al-Mubak, R. D. Enright & P. Cardis (1995). Forgiveness Education with Parentally Love-Deprived College Students. Journal of Moral Education 14:427-444.
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  3. Pamela Sue Anderson (ed.) (2010). New Topics in Feminist Philosophy of Religion: Resistance, Religion and Ethical-Political Relations.
  4. Molly Andrews (2000). Forgiveness in Context. Journal of Moral Education 29 (1):75-86.
    This article compares Enright's cognitive-developmental model of forgiveness (Enright et al., 1989, 1991, 1992, 1994) with a model of forgiveness based on communication between the wronged and the wrongdoer. While unilateral forgiveness is unconditional and is a process which happens wholly within the person who has suffered an injustice, negotiated forgiveness requires of the wrongdoer (1) confession; (2) ownership; and (3) repentance for their actions. Unilateral forgiveness is built upon the principle of identity; in contrast, negotiated forgiveness begins with, and (...)
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  5. Christopher Bennett (2003). Is Amnesty a Collective Act of Forgiveness? Contemporary Political Theory 2 (1):67.
  6. Richard J. Bernstein (2006). Derrida: The Aporia of Forgiveness? Constellations 13 (3):394-406.
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  7. Stephen Bloch-Shulman & David White (eds.) (2008). Forgiveness: Probing the Boundaries. Inter-Disciplinary Press.
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  8. Alisa L. Carse & Lynne Tirrell (2010). Forgiving Grave Wrongs. In Christopher Allers & Marieke Smit (eds.), Forgiveness In Perspective. Rodopi Press.
    We introduce what we call the Emergent Model of forgiving, which is a process-based relational model conceptualizing forgiving as moral and normative repair in the wake of grave wrongs. In cases of grave wrongs, which shatter the victim’s life, the Classical Model of transactional forgiveness falls short of illuminating how genuine forgiveness can be achieved. In a climate of persistent threat and distrust, expressions of remorse, rituals and gestures of apology, and acts of reparation are unable to secure the moral (...)
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  9. R. A. Duff (1990). Review Essay / Justice, Mercy, and Forgiveness. Criminal Justice Ethics 9 (2):51-63.
    Jeffrie G Murphy & Jean Hampton, Forgiveness and Mercy Cambridge and New York: Cambridge University Press, 1988, 194 pp. Kathleen Dean Moore, Pardons: Justice, Mercy, and the Public Interest New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989, 271 pp.
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  10. Robert D. Enright, Elizabeth A. Gassin & Ching‐Ru Wu (1992). Forgiveness: A Developmental View. Journal of Moral Education 21 (2):99-114.
    Abstract The concept of interpersonal forgiveness is described first through an examination of ancient writings and contemporary philosophical and psychological discourse. Two psychological models are then described. The first concerns developmental patterns in how people think about forgiving another. The second describes how people may go about forgiving another. Implications for counseling and education are drawn.
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  11. Robert D. Enright, Margaret Rhody, Breanne Litts & John S. Klatt (2014). Piloting Forgiveness Education in a Divided Community: Comparing Electronic Pen-Pal and Journaling Activities Across Two Groups of Youth. Journal of Moral Education 43 (1):1-17.
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  12. Christel Fricke (ed.) (2011). The Ethics of Forgiveness: A Collection of Essays. Routledge.
    We are often pressed to forgive or in need of forgiveness: Wrongdoing is common. Even after a perpetrator has been taken to court and punished, forgiveness still has a role to play. How should a victim and a perpetrator relate to each other outside the courtroom, and how should others relate to them? Communicating about forgiveness is particularly urgent in cases of civil war and crimes against humanity inside a community where, if there were no forgiveness, the community would fall (...)
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  13. Christel Fricke (ed.) (2011). The Ethics of Forgiveness: A Collection of Essays. Routledge.
    We are often pressed to forgive or in need of forgiveness: Wrongdoing is common. Even after a perpetrator has been taken to court and punished, forgiveness still has a role to play. How should a victim and a perpetrator relate to each other outside the courtroom, and how should others relate to them? Communicating about forgiveness is particularly urgent in cases of civil war and crimes against humanity inside a community where, if there were no forgiveness, the community would fall (...)
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  14. Christel Fricke (2011). What We Cannot Do to Each Other : On Forgiveness and Moral Vulnerability. In , The Ethics of Forgiveness: A Collection of Essays. Routledge.
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  15. Espen Gamlund (2011). Forgiveness Without Blame. In Christel Fricke (ed.), The Ethics of Forgiveness. Routledge.
    It is widely recognised in moral philosophy that there is only something to forgive in cases of unexcused and unjustified wrongdoing. I will call this the standard view. According to this view, forgiveness presupposes that the person to be forgiven has done something that warrants blame and resentment. This standard view has not prompted much discussion in the literature on forgiveness. Most writers on forgiveness seem to accept that it only makes sense to speak of forgiveness in those cases where (...)
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  16. Espen Gamlund (2011). The Duty to Forgive Repentant Wrongdoers. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 18 (5):651-671.
    The purpose of this paper is to consider the question of whether we have a duty to forgive those who repent and apologize for the wrong they have done. I shall argue that we have a pro tanto duty to forgive repentant wrongdoers, and I shall propose and consider the norm of forgiveness. This norm states that if a wrongdoer repents and apologizes to a victim, then the victim has a duty to forgive the wrongdoer, other things being equal. That (...)
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  17. Espen Gamlund (2010). Supererogatory Forgiveness. Inquiry 53 (6):540-564.
    While forgiveness is widely recognised as an example of a supererogatory action, it remains to be explained precisely what makes forgiveness supererogatory, or the circumstances under which it is supererogatory to forgive. Philosophers often claim that forgiveness is supererogatory, but most of the time they do so without offering an adequate explanation for why it is supererogatory to forgive. Accordingly, the literature on forgiveness lacks a sufficiently nuanced account of the supererogatory status of forgiveness. In this paper, I seek to (...)
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  18. Eve Garrad & David McNaughton (2011). Conditional Unconditional Forgiveness. In Christel Fricke (ed.), The Ethics of Forgiveness: A Collection of Essays. Routledge.
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  19. Gal Gerson (2006). The Asymmetry Between Apology and Forgiveness. Contemporary Political Theory 5 (4):447-468.
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  20. Anca Gheaus (2010). Is Unconditional Forgiveness Ever Good? In Pamela Sue Anderson (ed.), New Topics in Feminist Philosophy of Religion: Resistance, Religion and Ethical-Political Relations.
    Forgiveness is a compelling Christian ideal. By contrast, to many philosophers it is not clear that forgiveness should be endorsed as a moral requirement; some argue that unconditional forgiveness is morally wrong. Those who are required to exercise forgiveness can feel that their own dignity and moral worthiness is diminished by such requirement if insignificant recognition was given to the harms they suffered as victims. This is particularly significant when thinking about women’s lives. Forgiveness and justice occasion particularly painful quandaries (...)
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  21. Peter Goldie (2011). Self-Forgiveneess and the Narrative Sense of Self. In Christel Fricke (ed.), The Ethics of Forgiveness: A Collection of Essays. Routledge.
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  22. Trudy Govier (2011). Evil, Political Violence, and Forgiveness: Essays in Honor of Claudia Card. Edited by Andrea Veltman and Kathryn J.Norlock. Hypatia 26 (4):881-883.
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  23. Trudy Govier & Wilhelm Verwoerd (2002). The Promise and Pitfalls of Apology. Journal of Social Philosophy 33 (1):67–82.
  24. Deidre Nicole Green (2013). Works of Love in a World of Violence: Kierkegaard, Feminism, and the Limits of Self‐Sacrifice. Hypatia 28 (3):568-584.
    Feminist scholars adopt wide-ranging views of self-sacrifice: their critiques claim that women are inordinately affected by Christianity's valorization of self-sacrifice and that this traditional Christian value is inherently misogynistic and necrophilic. Although Søren Kierkegaard's Works of Love deems Christian love essentially sacrificial, love, in his view, sets significant limits on the role of self-sacrifice in human life. Through his proposed response to one who requests forgiveness, “Do you now truly love me?” Kierkegaard offers a model of forgiveness that subverts traditional (...)
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  25. Charles L. Griswold (2007). Forgiveness: A Philosophical Exploration. Cambridge University Press.
    Nearly everyone has wronged another. Who among us has not longed to be forgiven? Nearly everyone has suffered the bitter injustice of wrongdoing. Who has not struggled to forgive? Charles Griswold has written the first comprehensive philosophical book on forgiveness in both its interpersonal and political contexts, as well as its relation to reconciliation. Having examined the place of forgiveness in ancient philosophy and in modern thought, he discusses what forgiveness is, what conditions the parties to it must meet, its (...)
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  26. Charles L. Griswold & David Konstan (eds.) (2011). Ancient Forgiveness. Cambridge University Press.
    "In this book, twelve eminent scholars of classical antiquity and ancient and medieval Judaism and Christianity explore the nature and place of forgiveness in the pre-modern Western world.
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  27. Garry L. Hagberg (2011). The Self Rewritten : The Case of Self-Forgiveness. In Christel Fricke (ed.), The Ethics of Forgiveness: A Collection of Essays. Routledge.
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  28. Christoph Harbsmeier (2011). Forgiveness and Forbearance in Ancient China. In Christel Fricke (ed.), The Ethics of Forgiveness: A Collection of Essays. Routledge.
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  29. Pamela Hieronymi (2001). Articulating an Uncompromising Forgiveness. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (3):529-555.
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  30. Margaret R. Holmgren (2012). Forgiveness and Retribution: Responding to Wrongdoing. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction and overview; 2. The nature of forgiveness and resentment; 3. The moral analysis of the attitudes of forgiveness and resentment defined; 4. The moral analysis of the attitudes of self-forgiveness and self-condemnation; 5. Philosophical underpinnings of the basic attitudes: forgiveness, resentment, and the nature of persons; 6. Moral theory: justice and desert; 7. The public response to wrongdoing; 8. Restorative justice: the public response to wrongdoing and the process of addressing the wrong.
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  31. Stephen Ingram (2013). The Prudential Value of Forgiveness. Philosophia 41 (4):1069-1078.
    Most philosophers who discuss the value of forgiveness concentrate on its moral value. This paper focuses on the prudential value of forgiveness, which has been surprisingly neglected by moral philosophers. I suggest that this may be because part of the concept of forgiveness involves the forgiver being motivated by moral rather than prudential considerations. But this does not justify neglecting the prudential value of forgiveness, which is important even though forgivers should not be prudentially motivated. Forgiveness helps satisfy interests arising (...)
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  32. Claire Katz & Linda Radzik (2010). The Ethical and Political Dimensions of Making Amends: A Dialogue. South Central Review 27 (3):144-161.
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  33. Klaus-Michael Kodalle (2006). Annäherungen an Eine Theorie des Verzeihens. Steiner.
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  34. M. M. La Caze (2006). The Asymmetry Between Apology and Forgiveness. Contemporary Political Theory 5 (1):447-468.
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  35. Jakob Lothe (2011). Forgiveness, History, Narrative : W.G. Sebald's Austerlitz. In Christel Fricke (ed.), The Ethics of Forgiveness: A Collection of Essays. Routledge.
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  36. Alice MacLachlan (2012). The Philosophical Controversy Over Political Forgiveness. In Paul van Tongeren, Neelke Doorn & Bas van Stokkom (eds.), Public Forgiveness in Post-Conflict Contexts. Intersentia. 37-64.
    The question of forgiveness in politics has attained a certain cachet. Indeed, in the fifty years since Arendt commented on the notable absence of forgiveness in the political tradition, a vast and multidisciplinary literature on the politics of apology, reparation, and reconciliation has emerged. To a novice scouring the relevant literatures, it might appear that the only discordant note in this new veritable symphony of writings on political forgiveness has been sounded by philosophers. There is a more-than-healthy cynicism directed at (...)
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  37. Alice MacLachlan (2012). Forgiveness. By Eve Garrard and David McNaughton. (Acumen Publishing Ltd, 2010. Pp. Xi + 132. Price £9.99.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 62 (247):435-438.
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  38. Alice MacLachlan (2011). Relating After Wrongdoing: A Review of Forgiveness From a Feminist Perspective. By Kathryn Norlock and Making Amends: Atonement in Morality, Law and Politics. By Linda Radzik. [REVIEW] Hypatia 26 (4):851-857.
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  39. Alice MacLachlan (2009). Moral Powers and Forgivable Evils. In Kathryn Norlock & Andrea Veltman (eds.), Evil, Political Violence and Forgiveness: Essays in Honor of Claudia Card. Lexington.
    In The Atrocity Paradigm, Claudia Card suggests we forgiveness as a potentially valuable exercise of a victim's moral powers. Yet Card never makes explicit just what 'moral powers' are, or how to understand their grounding or scope. I draw out unacknowledged implications of her framework: namely, that others than the primary victim may forgive, and -- conversely -- that some victims may find themselves morally dis-empowered. Furthermore, talk of "moral powers" allows us to appropriately acknowledge the value of refusals to (...)
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  40. Alice MacLachlan (2009). Practicing Imperfect Forgiveness. In Lisa Tessman (ed.), Feminist Ethics and Social and Political Philosophy: Theorizing the Non-Ideal. Springer. 185--204.
    Forgiveness is typically regarded as a good thing - even a virtue - but acts of forgiveness can vary widely in value, depending on their context and motivation. Faced with this variation, philosophers have tended to reinforce everyday concepts of forgiveness with strict sets of conditions, creating ideals or paradigms of forgiveness. These are meant to distinguish good or praiseworthy instances of forgiveness from problematic instances and, in particular, to protect the self-respect of would-be forgivers. But paradigmatic forgiveness is problematic (...)
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  41. Alice MacLachlan (2008). Forgiveness and Moral Solidarity. In Stephen Bloch-Shulman & David White (eds.), Forgiveness: Probing the Boundaries. Inter-Disciplinary Press.
    The categorical denial of third-party forgiveness represents an overly individualistic approach to moral repair. Such an approach fails to acknowledge the important roles played by witnesses, bystanders, beneficiaries, and others who stand in solidarity to the primary victim and perpetrator. In this paper, I argue that the prerogative to forgive or withhold forgiveness is not universal, but neither is it restricted to victims alone. Not only can we make moral sense of some third-party acts and utterances of the form, “I (...)
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  42. Alice MacLachlan (2008). The Nature and Limits of Forgiveness. Dissertation, Boston University
    This dissertation is a philosophical investigation of forgiveness, in both interpersonal and political contexts. The aim of the dissertation is to demonstrate the merits of a broad, multidimensional account that remains faithful to the moral phenomenology of forgiving and being forgiven. Previous philosophical work has tended to see forgiveness primarily in terms of reactive attitudes: specifically, the struggle to overcome resentment. Yet defining forgiveness along these lines fails to do justice to common intuitions that, for example, forgiveness may be a (...)
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  43. Thaddeus Metz (2011). Limiting the Reach of Amnesty for Political Crimes: Which Extra-Legal Burdens on the Guilty Does National Reconciliation Permit? Constitutional Court Review 3:243-270.
    Suppose that it can be right to grant amnesty from criminal and civil liability to those guilty of political crimes in exchange for full disclosure about them. There remains this important question to ask about the proper form that amnesty should take: Which additional burdens, if any, should the state lift from wrongdoers in the wake of according them freedom from judicial liability? I answer this question in the context of a recent South African Constitutional Court case that considered whether (...)
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  44. Thaddeus Metz (2006). Judging Because Understanding: A Defence of Retributive Censure. In Pedro Tabensky (ed.), Judging and Understanding: Essays on Free Will, Narrative, Meaning and the Ethical Limits of Condemnation. Ashgate. 221-40.
    Thaddeus Metz defends the retributive theory of punishment against challenges mounted by some of the contributors to this collection (Kai Nielsen, Brian Penrose, Samantha Vice, Pedro Tabensky and Marc Fellman). People, he thinks, ought to be censured in a way that is proportional to what they have done and for which they are responsible. Understanding does not conflict with judging. On the contrary, according to him, the more we understand, the better we are able to censure appropriately. Metz’s argument is (...)
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  45. Herbert Morris (1988). Murphy on Forgiveness. Criminal Justice Ethics 7 (2):15-19.
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  46. Valentine Moulard-Leonard (2011). Moving Beyond Us and Them? Marginality, Rhizomes, and Immanent Forgiveness. Hypatia 27 (3):828 - 846.
    Here, I offer a candid response to bell hooks's call for a testimony to the “movement beyond a mere ‘us and them’ discussion” that purportedly informs contemporary radical and feminist thought on difference. In alignment with a tradition that includes bell hooks, Audre Lorde, Gloria Anzaldúa, and Aurora Levins Morales, I offer a personal testimony to the ways in which I—a middle-class, French, immigrant, continental-philosophy-bred incest survivor—envision both that movement and its limits. To establish these alliances means forming necessary (if (...)
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  47. Jeffrie G. Murphy (1988). Forgiveness, Mercy, and the Retributive Emotions. Criminal Justice Ethics 7 (2):3-15.
  48. Jerome Neu (2011). On Loving Our Enemies. In Christel Fricke (ed.), The Ethics of Forgiveness: A Collection of Essays. Routledge.
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  49. Kathryn J. Norlock & Jean Rumsey (2009). The Limits of Forgiveness. Hypatia 24 (1):100 - 122.
    In this paper, we contextualize Claudia Card's work on forgiveness within wider literatures on forgiveness. With Card, we emphasize the costs of forgiveness and the sufferings of victims, and suggest alternatives to forgiving evils. Women who live in particularly unsafe contexts require recognition more than reconciliation. We conclude that those who forgive evil also require recognition that respects the choices of forgiving agents, seeing their decisions as relevant to conceptual analysis about forgiveness.
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  50. Kathryn Norlock & Andrea Veltman (eds.) (2009). Evil, Political Violence and Forgiveness: Essays in Honor of Claudia Card. Lexington.
    The collection brings together an international cohort of distinguished moral and political philosophers who mediate with Card upon an array of twentieth-century atrocities and on the nature of evil actions, persons and institutions.
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