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  1. Guy Axtell (2003). Review of Rosenbaum. [REVIEW] Contemporary Pragmatism:178-187.
    There are many books on the market about religion in American thought and history, but the idea for a collection of essays focused directly upon pragmatist reconstructions of religious belief and sentiment is overdue. Stuart Rosenbaum’s reader admirably fills this need, and is bound to bring fresh insights to students and advanced researchers alike.
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  2. Zenon Ba|[Nacute]|Kowski (2004). Faith, Freedom and the Future: Religion in American Culture. Contemporary Political Theory 3 (2):236.
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  3. Rajeev Bhargava (1998). Secularism and its Critics. Oxford.
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  4. Sam Black (2007). Locke and the Skeptical Argument for Toleration. History of Philosophy Quarterly 24 (4):355-375.
  5. Paul Bou-Habib (forthcoming). Locke's Tracts and the Anarchy of the Religious Conscience. European Journal of Political Theory:1474885113499852.
    This article reconstructs the main arguments in John Locke’s first political writings, the highly rhetorical, and often obscure, Two Tracts on Government (1660–1662). The Tracts support the government’s right to impose religious ceremonies on its people, an astonishing fact given Locke’s famous defense of toleration in his later works. The reconstruction of the Tracts developed here allows us to see that rather than a pessimistic view of the prospects for peace under religious diversity, what mainly animates the young Locke is (...)
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  6. Corey Brettschneider (2010). A Transformative Theory of Religious Freedom. Political Theory 38 (2):187-213.
    Religious freedom is often thought to protect not only religious practices but also the underlying religious beliefs of citizens. But what should be said about religious beliefs that oppose religious freedom itself or that deny the concept of equal citizenship? The author argues here that such beliefs, while protected against coercive sanction, are rightly subject to attempts at transformation by the state in its expressive capacities. Transformation is entailed by a commitment to publicizing the reasons and principles that justify the (...)
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  7. Winfried Brugger (2009). From Animosity to Recognition to Identification: Models of the Relationship of Church and State and the Freedom of Religion. In Barend Christoffel Labuschagne & Ari Marcelo Solon (eds.), Religion and State - From Separation to Cooperation?: Legal-Philosophical Reflections for a de-Secularized World (Ivr Cracow Special Workshop). Nomos.
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  8. Stephen Clark (2009). Understanding Faith: Religious Belief and its Place in Society. Imprint Academic.
  9. Stephen R. L. Clark (2002). Review: Religious Commitment and Secular Reason. [REVIEW] Mind 111 (443):639-643.
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  10. Stephen R. L. Clark (1993). Book Review : Anarchy and Christianity by Jacques Ellul, Translated by G. W. Bromiley. Grand Rapids, Michigan, Eerdmans, 1988. Vi + 110pp. No Price. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 6 (1):52-55.
  11. Perry Dane (1996). Constitutional Law and Religion. In Dennis M. Patterson (ed.), A Companion to Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory. Blackwell Publishers.
    This essay on law and religion appears in the second edition of the Blackwell Companion to Philosophy of Law and Legal Theory, edited by Dennis Patterson. It is a revision of a similar entry in the book’s first edition. The essay opens by broadly discussing the complex relationships between law and religion writ large as movements in human history – social, cultural, intellectual, and institutional phenomena with distinct but often overlapping logics and concerns. It then hones in on the efforts (...)
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  12. Evan Fales, Are the Gods Apolitical? Philo.
    The attraction between religion and politics is perennial. Sometimes, in its long and checkered history, it has led to an adulterous affair. I want to ask what lies at the heart of this attraction, and whether that can shed any light on the current religious/political scene. But the romance metaphor is at bottom not a good one. I shall argue that, in their originary condition, religion and politics are "closer," both ontologically and in their motivation, than woman and man, closer (...)
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  13. Edward Halper (2004). Spinoza on the Political Value of Freedom of Religion. History of Philosophy Quarterly 21 (2):167-182.
    The last chapter of Spinoza's Theological-Political Treatise (TTP) is a brief for freedom of religion. In our enthusiasm for Spinoza's conclusion it is easy to overlook the blatant contradiction between this thesis and the central claim of the immediately preceding chapter that "right over matters of religion is vested entirely in the sovereign." There Spinoza emphasizes the necessity that there be but one sovereign in the state and the threat that autonomous religious authorities would pose to the authority of this (...)
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  14. Zachary Hoskins (2009). ''On Highest Authority: Do Religious Reasons Have a Place in Public Policy Debates?''. Social Theory and Practice 35 (3):393-412.
    This paper examines whether religious reasons have a legitimate place in a liberal democracy's policy debates. Robert Audi, building from Rawlsian themes, contends that civic virtue obliges religious citizens who advocate for public policies to have sufficiently motivating secular reasons. Others contend it's unfair to exclude reasonable citizens from policy debates merely because their only reasons are religious ones. This essay seeks to reconcile the intuitions behind these competing views. I examine Audi's account of the differences between religious and secular (...)
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  15. Hugh LaFollette (1989). Freedom of Religion and Children. Public Affairs Quarterly (1):75-87.
    In a number of recent federal court cases parents have sought to have their children exempted from certain school activities on the grounds that the children's participation in those activities violates their (the parents') right to freedom of religion. In Mozert v. Hawkin's County Public Schools (827 F. 2nd 1058) fundamentalist parents of several Tennessee public school children brought civil action against the school board for violating their constitutional right of freedom of religion. These parents sought to prevent their children (...)
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  16. Annabelle Lever (2013). 'Taxation, Conscientious Objection and Religious Freedom'. Ethical Perspectives 20 (1):144-153.
    This is part of a symposium on conscientious objection and religious freedom inspired by the US Catholic Church's claim that being forced to pay for health insurance that covers abortions (the effect of 'Obamacare')is the equivalent of forcing pacifists to fight. This article takes issue with this claim, and shows that while it would be unjust on democratic principles to force pacifists to fight, given their willingness to serve their country in other ways, there is no democratic objection to forcing (...)
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  17. Marek Piechowiak (2012). Wolność religijna i dyskryminacja religijna – uwagi w kontekście rezolucji Parlamentu Europejskiego z 20 stycznia 2011 r. [Freedom of Religion and Religious Discrimination – Remarks on the European Parliament Resolution of 20 January 2011]. In Stanisław Leszek Stadniczeńko (ed.), Urzeczywistnianie wolności przekonań religijnych i praw z niej wynikających. Redakcja Wydawnictw Wydziału Teologicznego Uniwersytetu Opolskiego. 103-139.
    The aim of this paper is to present and analyse legal acts cited in the European Parliament resolution of 20 January 2011 on the situation of Christians in the context of freedom of religion. The author presents the substance of the right to religious freedom and the position of religious freedom among other human rights. The paper also shows the formation of European law on religious freedom and grasps the development trends in this area. Because of the discrepancies that arise (...)
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  18. Marek Piechowiak (2011). Negatywna wolność religijna i przekonania sekularystyczne w świetle sprawy Lautsi przeciwko Włochom [Negative Religious Freedom and Secular Thought in the Light of the Case of Lautsi v. Italy]. Przegląd Sejmowy 19 (5 (106)):37-68.
    The article provides an analysis of the European Court of Human Rights judgments in the case of Lautsi v. Italy (application no. 30814/06), also known as the Italian crucifix case. The applicant claimed that displaying crucifixes in the Italian State-school classrooms attended by her children was contrary to the principle of secularism, by which she wished to bring up her children, and therefore infringed her right to ensure their education and teaching in conformity with her religious and philosophical convictions, and (...)
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  19. Michaela Rehm (2014). Cement of Society? Why Civil Religion is Unfit to Create Social Bonds. In Dieter Thomä, Christoph Henning & Hans Bernhard Schmid (eds.), Social capital, social identities: From ownership to belonging. De Gruyter. 123-134.
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  20. Gidon Sapir & Daniel Statman (2005). Why Freedom of Religion Does Not Include Freedom From Religion. Law and Philosophy 24 (5):467-508.
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  21. D. M. Shaw & J. Busch (2012). Rawls and Religious Paternalism. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (4):373-386.
    MacDougall has argued that Rawls’s liberal social theory suggests that parents who hold certain religious convictions can legitimately refuse blood transfusion on their children’s behalf. This paper argues that this is wrong for at least five reasons. First, MacDougall neglects the possibility that true freedom of conscience entails the right to choose one’s own religion rather than have it dictated by one’s parents. Second, he conveniently ignores the fact that children in such situations are much more likely to die than (...)
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  22. Roger Trigg (2012). Equality, Freedom, and Religion. OUP Oxford.
    Is religious freedom being curtailed in pursuit of equality, and the outlawing of discrimination? Is enough effort made to accommodate those motivated by a religious conscience? All rights matter but at times the right to put religious beliefs into practice increasingly takes second place in the law of different countries to the pursuit of other social priorities. The right to freedom of belief and to manifest belief is written into all human rights charters. In the United States religious freedom is (...)
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  23. Daniel Weinstock (2011). Beyond Objective and Subjective: Assessing the Legitimacy of Religious Claims to Accommodation. Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 6 (2):155-175.
    There are at present two ways in which to evaluate religiously-based claims to accommodation in the legal context. The first, objective approach holds that these claims should be grounded in « facts of the matter » about the religions in question. The second, subjective approach, is grounded in an appreciation by the courts of the sincerity of the claimant. The first approach has the advantage of accounting for the difference between two constitutional principles : freedom of conscience on the one (...)
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  24. John S. Wilkins (2010). The Role of Secularism in Protecting Religion. In Warren Bonett (ed.), The Australian Book of Atheism. Embiggen Books.
  25. Alexa Zellentin (2014). Freedom, Equality, Minarets. Res Publica 20 (1):45-63.
    This paper discusses the Swiss minaret ban as a threat to equal citizenship rather than a threat to freedom of religion. The main argument of the paper is that cultural differences can threaten the fair value of equal political participation rights as well as socio-economic ones. These differences are morally troubling despite legitimate emphasis on the need for a shared (political) culture. To ensure that the state treats its citizens as equals with regard to cultural differences requires a form of (...)
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