This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
64 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 64
  1. Jonathan E. Adler (2008). Sticks and Stones: A Reply to Warren. Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (4):639-655.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. David Archard (2014). Insults, Free Speech and Offensiveness. Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (2):127-141.
    This article examines what is wrong with some expressive acts, ‘insults’. Their putative wrongfulness is distinguished from the causing of indirect harms, aggregated harms, contextual harms, and damaging misrepresentations. The article clarifies what insults are, making use of work by Neu and Austin, and argues that their wrongfulness cannot lie in the hurt that is caused to those at whom such acts are directed. Rather it must lie in what they seek to do, namely to denigrate the other. The causing (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. David Armstrong & Thomas M. Burton (forthcoming). Book Censorship in France. Journal of Information Ethics.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. John Arthur (1997). Recent Work in Freedom of Speech. Philosophical Books 38 (4):225-234.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Agemir Bavaresco & Paulo Roberto Konzen (2009). SETTINGS OF PRESS FREEDOM AND PUBLIC OPINION IN HEGEL. Kriterion 50 (119):63-92.
    New settings for communication are being built, having, at one side, great corporations of television, radio, press and on line media, and at the other side the role of the independent / alternative press, understood as not bound to a private, public or state enterprise or to some economic group. It takes gradually shape the constitution of the opposition between the traditional media and the independent / alternative press, having as a material base the new technologies of information. How can (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Fred R. Berger (1986). The Right of Free Expression. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 3 (2):1-10.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Sanford Berman (2005). Unmuzzle Us! Journal of Information Ethics 14 (1):5-5.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Kylie Bourne (2011). Commanding and Controlling Protest Crowds. Critical Horizons 12 (2):189-210.
    Police and authorities have increasingly adopted "command and control" strategies to the policing of intentionally peaceful protest crowds. These strategies work to close down access to a physical space in which a protest is to occur and thus in turn they effectively restrict the capacity of a citizen to engage in the democratic right of peaceful protest.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Corey Brettschneider (2010). When the State Speaks What Should. Perspectives on Politics.
  10. Corey Brettschneider (2010). A Transformative Theory of Religious Freedom. Political Theory 38 (2):187-213.
    Religious freedom is often thought to protect not only religious practices but also the underlying religious beliefs of citizens. But what should be said about religious beliefs that oppose religious freedom itself or that deny the concept of equal citizenship? The author argues here that such beliefs, while protected against coercive sanction, are rightly subject to attempts at transformation by the state in its expressive capacities. Transformation is entailed by a commitment to publicizing the reasons and principles that justify the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Kimberley Brownlee, Civil Disobedience. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  12. William Bruening (1976). Freedom of Speech: Liberals Yersus Radicals. Journal of Social Philosophy 7 (3):1-4.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. R. D. Catterall (1980). Homosexuality and Freedom of Speech. Journal of Medical Ethics 6 (3):128-129.
  14. Colin Chasi (forthcoming). Ubuntu and Freedom of Expression. Ethics and Behavior:140228215534002.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. J. Caleb Clanton (2009). A Critical Response to Thomas Peard on Sexual Harassment and the Limits of Free Speech. Southwest Philosophy Review 25 (2):57-61.
  16. E. Cline (1995). Here Comes a Chopper to Chop Off Your Head-Freedom of Expression Vs Censorship in America. Journal of Information Ethics 4 (2):18-32.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Moshe Cohen-Eliya & Yoav Hammer (2004). Advertisements, Stereotypes, and Freedom of Expression. Journal of Social Philosophy 35 (2):165–187.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Philip Cook & Conrad Heilmann (2013). Two Types of Self-Censorship: Public and Private. Political Studies 61 (1):178-196.
    We develop and defend a distinction between two types of self-censorship: public and private. First, we suggest that public self-censorship refers to a range of individual reactions to a public censorship regime. Second, private self-censorship is the suppression by an agent of his or her own attitudes where a public censor is either absent or irrelevant. The distinction is derived from a descriptive approach to self-censorship that asks: who is the censor, who is the censee, and how do they interact? (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Ian Cram (1998). Free Speech, Fair Trials, Lawyers and the Mediaan Overview of Recent Developments. Legal Ethics 1 (2):119-122.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Michael Kent Curtis (2004). Democratic Ideals and Media Realities: A Puzzling Free Press Paradox. Social Philosophy and Policy 21 (2):385-427.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Boudewijn de Bruin (2008). Media Violence and Freedom of Speech: How to Use Empirical Data. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (5):493-505.
    Susan Hurley has argued against a well known argument for freedom of speech, the argument from autonomy, on the basis of two hypotheses about violence in the media and aggressive behaviour. The first hypothesis says that exposure to media violence causes aggressive behaviour; the second, that humans have an innate tendency to copy behaviour in ways that bypass conscious deliberation. I argue, first, that Hurley is not successful in setting aside the argument from autonomy. Second, I show that the empirical (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Danny Frederick, The Philosophical Case For Pornography.
  23. Danny Frederick (2011). Pornography and Freedom. Kritike: An Online Journal of Philosophy 5 (2):84-95.
    I defend pornography as an important aspect of freedom of expression, which is essential for autonomy, self-development, the growth of knowledge and human flourishing. I rebut the allegations that pornography depraves and corrupts, degrades women, is harmful to children, exposes third parties to risk of offence or assault, and violates women’s civil rights and liberties. I contend that suppressing pornography would have a range of unintended evil consequences, including loss of beneficial technology, creeping censorship, black markets, corruption and extensive social (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Katharine Gelber (2010). Freedom of Political Speech, Hate Speech and the Argument From Democracy: The Transformative Contribution of Capabilities Theory. Contemporary Political Theory 9 (3):304-324.
  25. Jonathan Gilmore (2011). Expression as Realization: Speakers' Interests in Freedom of Speech. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 30 (5):517-539.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Joseph Grcic (1988). Freedom of Speech and Access to Mass Media. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (1):51-58.
  27. Adam Hosein (forthcoming). Democracy, Paternalism, and Campaign Finance. Public Affairs Quarterly.
  28. Graham Hubbs (2014). Transparency, Corruption, and Democratic Institutions. Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 9 (1):65-83.
    This essay examines some of the institutional arrangements that underlie corruption in democracy. It begins with a discussion of institutions as such, elaborating and extending some of John Searle’s remarks on the topic. It then turns to an examination of specifically democratic institutions; it draws here on Joshua Cohen’s recent Rousseau: A Free Community of Equals. One of the central concerns of Cohen’s Rousseau is how to arrange civic institutions so that they are able to perform their public functions without (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Susan Hurley (2004). Imitation, Media Violence, and Freedom of Speech. Philosophical Studies 117 (1-2):165-218.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Susan L. Hurley (2006). Bypassing Conscious Control: Media Violence, Unconscious Imitation, and Freedom of Speech. In S. Pockett, W. Banks & S. Gallagher (eds.), Does Consciousness Cause Behavior? MIT Press.
    Why does it matter whether and how individuals consciously control their behavior? It matters for many reasons. Here I focus on concerns about social influences of which agents are typically unaware on aggressive behavior.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Susan L. Hurley (2006). Bypassing Conscious Control: Unconscious Imitation, Media Violence, and Freedom of Speech. In Susan Pockett, William P. Banks & Shaun Gallagher (eds.), Does Consciousness Cause Behavior? MIT Press. 301-337.
  32. Daniel Jacobson (2007). Freedom of Speech : Why Freedom of Speech Includes Hate Speech. In Jesper Ryberg, Thomas S. Petersen & Clark Wolf (eds.), New Waves in Applied Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Daniel Jacobson (1995). Freedom of Speech Acts? A Response to Langton. Philosophy and Public Affairs 24 (1):64–78.
  34. Sharon Kaye (1998). There's No Such Thing as Heresy (and It's a Good Thing, Too): William of Ockham on Freedom of Speech. Journal of Political Philosophy 6 (1):41–52.
  35. Anine Kierulf & Helge Rønning (eds.) (2009). Freedom of Speech Abridged?: Cultural, Legal and Philosophical Challenges. Nordicom.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. E. R. Klein (2002). Whither Academic Freedom? International Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (1):41-53.
    Academic freedom has become the enemy of the individual professors working in colleges and universities across the United States. Despite its historical (and maybe even essential) roots in the First Amendment, contemporary case law has consistently shown that professors, unlike most members of society, have no rights to free speech on their respective campuses. (Ironically, this is especially true on our State campuses.) Outlined is the dramatic change in the history of the courts from recognizing “academic freedom” as a construct (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Rae Langton (2000). Pornography and Free Speech. The Philosophers' Magazine 11 (11):41-42.
  38. Robert Justin Lipkin (1997). Book Review:Liberalism Divided: Freedom of Speech and the Many Uses of State Power. Owen M. Fiss. [REVIEW] Ethics 107 (4):737-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Andrew F. March (2012). Speech and the Sacred: Does the Defense of Free Speech Rest on a Mistake About Religion? Political Theory 40 (3):319 - 346.
    Some scholars have argued that religiously injurious speech poses a serious problem for secular liberal thought. It has been suggested that secular liberal thought and political practice often misrecognize the nature of the injury involved in speech that violates the sacred and that much secular thought about religious injury (and free exercise more generally) is premised on unacknowledged Protestant conceptions of what real religion is. In this essay, I argue against the ideas that secular liberalism tends to treat religion only (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Betty McLellan (2010). Unspeakable: A Feminist Ethic of Speech. Otherwise Publications.
  41. Zoltan Miklosi (2014). A Puzzle About Free Speech, Legitimacy, and Countermajoritarian Constraints. Res Publica 20 (1):27-43.
    This paper argues that there is a tension between two central features of Dworkin’s partnership conception of democracy. The conception holds, on the one hand, that it is a necessary condition of the legitimacy of the decisions of a political majority that every member of the political community has a very robust right to publicly criticize those decisions. A plausible interpretation of this argument is that free political speech constitutes a normatively privileged vehicle for political minorities to become majorities, and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. John Bruce Moore (1975). On Philosophizing About Freedom of Speech. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 6 (3):47-73.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Kelly Oliver & Christina Hendricks (eds.) (1999). Language and Liberation: Feminism, Philosophy and Language,. SUNY Press.
    Gathers authors with different backgrounds and methods to advance feminist discussions of the relation between language and women's oppression, suggesting promising new directions for further research.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Susan Pockett (2004). Does Consciousness Cause Behaviour? Journal of Consciousness Studies 11 (2):23-40.
  45. Robert Post (2007). Religion and Freedom of Speech: Portraits of Muhammad. Constellations 14 (1):72-90.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Martin H. Redish (1992). Freedom of Thought as Freedom of Expression: Hate Crime Sentencing Enhancement and First Amendment Theory. Criminal Justice Ethics 11 (2):29-42.
  47. Christian F. Rostbøll (2011). Freedom of Expression, Deliberation, Autonomy and Respect. European Journal of Political Theory 10 (1):5-21.
    This paper elaborates on the deliberative democracy argument for freedom of expression in terms of its relationship to different dimensions of autonomy. It engages the objection that Enlightenment theories pose a threat to cultures that reject autonomy and argues that autonomy-based democracy is not only compatible with but necessary for respect for cultural diversity. On the basis of an intersubjective epistemology, it argues that people cannot know how to live on mutually respectful terms without engaging in public deliberation and developing (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Re'em Segev (2008). Freedom of Expression: Justifications & Restrictions. Israel Democracy Institute.
    "Freedom of expression" is a complex notion that reflects various considerations and raises many questions related to their content and interaction. This paper is an abstract of a book that considers general aspects regarding the justification and the limits of freedom of expression and analyzes exiting law in light of this normative discussion. Particularly, it considers the way to determine the proper scope of freedom of expression; first-order and second-order considerations in favor and against freedom of expression, both in general (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Re'em Segev (2001). Freedom of Expression Against Governmental Authorities. Israel Democracy Institute.
    The subject of this study is the justification for limiting negative expression directed at the government: its institutions and public officials, in order to preserve public faith in government. This paper is an abstract of a book that considers this question. The conclusion is that since the value of speech concerned with the performance of government is very high and the interest in protecting the status of government is limited and typically not substantial, there is generally no justification for legal (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Anthony Skillen (1982). Freedom of Speech. In Keith Graham (ed.), Contemporary Political Philosophy: Radical Studies. Cambridge University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 64