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  1. Corey Brettschneider (2010). When the State Speaks What Should. Perspectives on Politics.
  2. Benedictus de Spinoza (1962). Spinoza on Freedom of Thought. Montreal, M. Casalini.
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  3. Michael Forster, The Liberal Temper in Classical German Philosophy: Freedom of Thought and Expression.
    Consideration of the German philosophy and political history of the past century might well give the impression, and often does give foreign observers the impression, that liberalism, including in particular commitment to the ideal of free thought and expression, is only skin-deep in Germany. Were not Heidegger's disgust at Gerede (which of course really meant the free speech of the Weimar Republic) and Gadamer's defense of "prejudice" and "tradition" more reflective of the true instincts of German philosophy than, say, the (...)
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  4. Thomas Nemeth (1985). Freedom of Thought and Expression in Eurocommunist Philosophy. Studies in East European Thought 30 (4):397-406.
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  5. Marek Piechowiak (2011). Negatywna wolność religijna i przekonania sekularystyczne w świetle sprawy Lautsi przeciwko Włochom [Negative Religious Freedom and Secular Thought in the Light of the Case of Lautsi v. Italy]. Przegląd Sejmowy 19 (5 (106)):37-68.
    The article provides an analysis of the European Court of Human Rights judgments in the case of Lautsi v. Italy (application no. 30814/06), also known as the Italian crucifix case. The applicant claimed that displaying crucifixes in the Italian State-school classrooms attended by her children was contrary to the principle of secularism, by which she wished to bring up her children, and therefore infringed her right to ensure their education and teaching in conformity with her religious and philosophical convictions, and (...)
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  6. Martin H. Redish (1992). Freedom of Thought as Freedom of Expression: Hate Crime Sentencing Enhancement and First Amendment Theory. Criminal Justice Ethics 11 (2):29-42.
  7. David T. Risser (2001). Freedom of Information. In Derek Jones (ed.), Censorship: A World Encyclopedia (vol. 2). Fitzroy Dearborn:881-883.
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  8. Sydney Waterlow (1914). Book Review:A History of Freedom of Thought. J. B. Bury. [REVIEW] Ethics 24 (3):350-.
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  9. James Weinstein (1992). Some Further Thoughts on “Thought Crimes”. Criminal Justice Ethics 11 (2):61-63.
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  10. Gustav A. Wetter (1966). Freedom of Thought and Ideological Coexistence. Studies in East European Thought 6 (4):260-273.
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  11. Harvey Wish (1941). Book Review:Freedom of Thought in the Old South. Clement Eaton. [REVIEW] Ethics 51 (2):241-.
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