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  1. Arif Ahmed (2013). From Game Theoretical Accounts of Cooperation to Meta-Ethical Choices. Studies in Christian Ethics 26 (2):176-183.
  2. Max Albert & Hannes Rusch, Indirect Reciprocity, Golden Opportunities for Defection, and Inclusive Reputation. MAGKS Discussion Paper Series in Economics.
    In evolutionary models of indirect reciprocity, reputation mechanisms can stabilize cooperation even in severe cooperation problems like the prisoner’s dilemma. Under certain circumstances, conditionally cooperative strategies, which cooperate iff their partner has a good reputation, cannot be invaded by any other strategy that conditions behavior only on own and partner reputation. The first point of this paper is to show that an evolutionary version of backward induction can lead to a breakdown of this kind of indirectly reciprocal cooperation. Backward induction, (...)
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  3. Friedel Bolle (1983). On Sen's Second-Order Preferences, Morals, and Decision Theory. Erkenntnis 20 (2):195 - 205.
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  4. Alan Carter (1999). Game Theory and Decentralisation. Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (3):223–234.
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  5. John R. Chamberlin (1989). Ethics and Game Theory. Ethics and International Affairs 3 (1):261–276.
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  6. Charles J. Coates, Robert E. Florence & Kristi L. Kral (2002). Financial Statement Audits,a Game of Chicken? Journal of Business Ethics 41 (1-2):1 - 11.
    This paper uses the intuition from the game of chickento model client-auditor financial reporting and audit effort strategies. Within an ethical context, our model is concerned with the client misreporting and its detection by the auditor. The paper uses a welfare game(similar to the game of chicken) to more formally model client-auditor strategies. The welfare game is then extended to provide additional insight into ethical and audit effort issues.Such a welfare gameprovides equilibrium in mixed strategies. This mixed strategy solution makes (...)
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  7. Mark Colyvan, Mating, Dating, and Mathematics: It's All in the Game.
    Why do people stay together in monogamous relationships? Love? Fear? Habit? Ethics? Integrity? Desperation? In this paper I will consider a rather surprising answer that comes from mathematics. It turns out that cooperative behaviour, such as mutually-faithful marriages, can be given a firm basis in a mathematical theory known as game theory. I will suggest that faithfulness in relationships is fully accounted for by narrow self interest in the appropriate game theory setting. This is a surprising answer because faithful behaviour (...)
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  8. Mark Colyvan, Damian Cox & Katie Steele (2010). Modelling the Moral Dimension of Decisions. Noûs 44 (3):503-529.
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  9. James C. Gaa (1990). A Game-Theoretic Analysis of Professional Rights and Responsibilities. Journal of Business Ethics 9 (3):159 - 169.
    Professions are granted autonomy by society, to regulate their own affairs. In return for the economic benefits autonomy grants to professions, society expects professions to act in a socially responsible manner. This paper presents a game-theoretic analysis of the relationship between society and professions, which shows that the relationship is unstable in the face of opportunities for professions to renege on the social contract. It also shows how periodic controversies regarding the degree to which professionals act in the public interest (...)
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  10. Abraham D. Graber & Mark A. Graber (2008). Wetware, Game Theory, and the Golden Rule. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (5):30 – 31.
  11. Steven T. Kuhn (2004). Reflections on Ethics and Game Theory. Synthese 141 (1):1 - 44.
    Applications of game theory to moral philosophy are impededby foundational issues and troublesome examples. In the first part of this paper,questions are raised about the appropriate game-theoretical frameworks for applications to moralphilosophy and about the proper interpretations of the theoretical devices employed inthese frameworks. In the second part, five examples that should be of particular interest to thoseinterested in the connections between ethics and game theory are delineated and discussed. Thefirst example comprises games in which there is an outcome unanimously (...)
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  12. David Lewis (1984). Devil's Bargains and the Real World. In Douglas Maclean (ed.), The Security Gamble: Deterrence in the Nuclear Age. Rowman and Allenheld. 141-154.
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  13. James McBain (2003). The Moral Poker Face: Games, Deception, and the Morality of Bluffing. Contemporary Philosophy (5&6):55-60.
    Bluffing is essentially nothing more than a type of deception. But, despite its morally questionable foundation, it is not only permissible in certain contexts, but sometimes encouraged and/or required (e.g., playing poker). Yet, the question remains as to whether it is permissible to bluff in other contexts – particularly everyday situations. In this paper, I look at László Mérő’s argument – one based in game theory and Kantian ethics – to the end that bluffing is morally permissible in everyday contexts. (...)
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  14. J. Moreh (1992). Economic Analysis, Common-Sense Morality and Utilitarianism. Erkenntnis 37 (1):115 - 143.
    Economic concepts and methods are used to throw light on some aspects of common-sense ethics and the difference between it and Utilitarianism. (1) Very few exceptions are allowed to the rules of common-sense ethics, because of the cost of information required to justify an exception to Conscience and to other people. No such stringency characterizes Utilitarianism, an abstract system constructed by philosophers. (2) Rule Utilitarianism is neither consistent with common-sense ethics, nor does it maximize utility as has been claimed for (...)
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  15. Jan Narveson (2010). The Relevance of Decision Theory to Ethical Theory. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (5):497-520.
    Morality for the purposes of this paper consists of sets of rules or principles intended for the general regulation of conduct for all. Intuitionist accounts of morality are rejected as making reasoned analysis of morals impossible. In many interactions, there is partial conflict and partial cooperation. From the general social point of view, the rational thing to propose is that we steer clear of conflict and promote cooperation. This is what it is rational to propose to reinforce, and to assist (...)
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  16. Hilary Putnam (1986). Rationality in Decision Theory and in Ethics. Crítica 18 (54):3 - 16.
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  17. Mark Sagoff (1989). Book Review:Rational Ecology: Environment and Political Economy. John S. Dryzek. [REVIEW] Ethics 100 (1):192-.
  18. Robert C. Solomon (1999). Game Theory as a Model for Business and Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 9 (1):11-29.
    Fifty years ago, two Princeton professors established game theory as an important new branch of applied mathematics. Gametheory has become a celebrated discipline in its own right, and it now plays a prestigious role in many disciplines, including ethics,due in particular to the neo-Hobbesian thinking of David Gauthier and others. Now it is perched at the edge of business ethics. I believethat it is dangerous and demeaning. It makes us look the wrong way at business, reinforcing a destructive obsession with (...)
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  19. Chandra Sekhar Sripada (2004). Review of Morton's The Importance of Being Understood: Folk Psychology as Ethics. [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (2):359 – 361.
    Book Information The Importance of Being Understood: Folk Psychology as Ethics. The Importance of Being Understood: Folk Psychology as Ethics Adam Morton , London; New York: Routledge , 2002 , 240 , US$95 ( cloth ), US$29.95 ( paper ) By Adam Morton. London; New York: Routledge. Pp. 240. US$95 (cloth:), US$29.95 (paper:).
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  20. B. Verbeek (2002). Game Theory and Moral Norms. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 2 (3):337-352.
    This paper provides an overview of developments in the application of game theory to moral philosophy. Game theory has been used in moral theory in three ways. First, as a tool to analyze the function of moral norms. Secondly, to characterize bargaining about moral norms. Thirdly, the paper demonstrates how game theory can make sense of the authority of moral norms in a way that renders the concept suitable for further analysis.
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  21. Bruno Verbeek, Game Theory and Ethics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Game theory is the systematic study of interdependent rational choice. It should be distinguished from decision theory, the systematic study of individual (practical and epistemic) choice in parametric contexts (i.e., where the agent is choosing or deliberating independently of other agents). Decision theory has several applications to ethics (see Dreier 2004; Mele and Rawlings 2004). Game theory may be used to explain, to predict, and to evaluate human behavior in contexts where the outcome of action depends on what several agents (...)
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