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  1. Chad Kautzer (2015). Radical Philosophy: An Introduction. Routledge.
    In this accessible introduction for students, teachers, and activists, Chad Kautzer guides readers through the dynamic field of radical philosophy. Kautzer s innovative approach is to organize the analysis of radical philosophical projects from Marxism, feminism, and queer theory to radical environmental, race, and political theory around their defining methodological commitments and emancipatory goals. Beginning with a discussion of the historical, dialectical, and reflexive forms of critique these projects employ, Radical Philosophy reveals the internal structure and overlapping similarities of particular (...)
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  2. Chad Nilep (2006). Negotiation of Identity in Multilingual Contexts: Aneta Pavlenko, Adrian Blackledge. [REVIEW] Journal of Pragmatics 38 (2):276-281.
    Review of the book Negotiation of Identity in Multilingual Contexts, Aneta Pavlenko and Adrian Blackledge (eds.) 2004.
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  3. Marja Rytkӧnen (2012). Memorable Fiction. Evoking Emotions and Family Bonds in Post-Soviet Russian Women’s Writing. ARGUMENT 2 (1):59-74.
    This article deals with women-centred prose texts of the 1990s and 2000s in Russia written by women, and focuses especially on generation narratives. By this term the author means fictional texts that explore generational relations within families, from the perspective of repressed experiences, feelings and attitudes in the Soviet period. The selected texts are interpreted as narrating and conceptualizing the consequences of patriarchal ideology for relations between mothers and daughters and for reconstructing connections between Soviet and post-Soviet by revisiting and (...)
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  4. Elena Sokol (2012). Diverse Voices: Czech Women’s Writing in the Post-Communist Era. ARGUMENT 2 (1):37-57.
    This essay offers an overview of the diversity of women’s prose writing that emerged on the Czech cultural scene in the post-communist era. To that end it briefly characterizes the work of eight Czech women authors who were born within the first two decades after World War II and began to create during the post-1968 era of ‘normalization’. In this broad sense they belong to a single generation. With rare exception their work was not officially published in their homeland until (...)
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  5. Helga Varden (2015). Kant and Women. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 96 (4):n/a-n/a.
    Kant's conception of women is complex. Although he struggles to bring his considered view of women into focus, a sympathetic reading shows it not to be anti-feminist and to contain important arguments regarding human nature. Kant believes the traditional male-female distinction is unlikely to disappear, but he never proposes the traditional gender ideal as the moral ideal; he rejects the idea that such considerations of philosophical anthropology can set the framework for morality. This is also why his moral works clarifies (...)
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