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  1. Hanne Andersen, Dennis Dieks, Wenceslao González, Thomas Uebel & Gregory Wheeler (eds.) (2013). New Challenges to Philosophy of Science. Springer Verlag.
    This fourth volume of the Programme “The Philosophy of Science in a European Perspective” deals with new challenges in this field. In this regard, it seeks to broaden the scope of the philosophy of science in two directions. On the one hand, ...
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  2. Peter D. Asquith & Henry Ely Kyburg (eds.) (1979). Current Research in Philosophy of Science: Proceedings of the P.S.A. Critical Research Problems Conference. Philosophy of Science Association.
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  3. Gillian Barker & Philip Kitcher (2013). Philosophy of Science: A New Introduction. Oxford University Press.
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  4. Antonio Bereijo (2012). The Category of "Applied Science": An Analysis of Its Justification From "Information Science" As Design Science. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 101 (1):327-350.
    This paper addresses the problem of the distinction between basic science and applied science. It also explores their differences with regard to technology. For this analysis, as well as a general epistemological and methodological approach, we study a particular case: information science. As the emphasis of the paper is on the category of applied science, it includes a critical analysis of Philip Kitcher's proposal. First, there is an examination of Ph. Kitcher's thought, because he has addressed this issue without offering (...)
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  5. Richard J. Blackwell (1977). "Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 6: Induction, Probability, and Confirmation," Ed. Grover Maxwell and Robert M. Anderson, Jr.; and "Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science, Vol. 7: Language, Mind, and Knowledge," Ed. Keith Gunderson. [REVIEW] Modern Schoolman 54 (3):307-308.
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  6. Richard J. Blackwell (1970). Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science. Vol. V: Proceedings of the Boston Colloquium for the Philosophy of Science 1966-68. Ed. R. S. Cohen and M. W. Wartofsky. [REVIEW] Modern Schoolman 47 (3):354-355.
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  7. David Blair (2012). Science Works Better Than That. Australian Humanist, The 108 (108):12.
    Blair, David David Tribe, in his article, 'On science, good, bad and ugly' (AH, No. 107, Spring 2012), criticises an earlier article by Victor Bien. Bien - rightly in my view - defends present-day science in respect of three areas where science is under attack; the most prominent of these three is anthropogenic global warming (AGW). Tribe claims that, Victor Bien appears to have inflated views on the sagacity, objectivity and probity of scientists, who can be called our new priests. (...)
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  8. Walter J. Bock (2000). Towards a New Metaphysics: The Need for an Enlarged Philosophy Ofscience. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 15 (4):603-621.
  9. R. B. Braithwaite & D. H. Mellor (eds.) (1980). Science, Belief, and Behaviour: Essays in Honour of R. B. Braithwaite. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume is a collection of original essays by eminent philosophers written for R. B. Braithwaite's eightieth birthday to celebrate his work and teaching. In one way or another, all the essays reflect his central concern with the impact of science on our beliefs about the world and the responses appropriate to that. Together they testify to the signal importance of his contributions in areas of philosophy bearing on this concern: the philosophy of science, especially of the statistical sciences, theories (...)
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  10. Baruch A. Brody (1970). Readings in the Philosophy of Science. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.,Prentice-Hall.
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  11. Harold I. Brown (2006). Conceptual Systems. London.
    New concepts are constantly being introduced into our thinking. Conceptual Systems explores how these new concepts are entered into our systems along with sufficient continuity with older ideas to ensure understanding. The encyclopaedic breadth of this text highlights the many different aspects and disciplines that together present an insightful view into the various theories of concepts. Harold Brown, a reputable author in the philosophy of science examines several historically influential theories of concepts as well as providing a clear view on (...)
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  12. Harold I. Brown (1988). Rationality. Routledge.
  13. Krzysztof Brzechczyn (2009). Leszek Nowak (1943-2009). Polish Journal of Philosophy 3 (2):7-8.
    This paper is obituary of Leszek Nowak, one of the greatest Polish philosophers of the XX century.
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  14. Constança Marcondes César (2012). Conhecimento E verdadeKnowledge and Truth: The Philosophy of Science in Milton Vargas. Cultura 29:99-105.
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  15. Auguste Comte (1998). Book Notices-Philosophie Des Sciences. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 20 (3):377.
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  16. Willem R. de Jong (2001). Bernard Bolzano, Analyticity and the Aristotelian Model of Science. Kant-Studien 92 (3):328-349.
    Quine's well-known ‘Two Dogmas of Empiricism’ (1951) plays a key role in the debate about the analytic-synthetic distinction. Taking to task the ideas of Carnap in particular, Quine shows that logical positivism works with a concept of scientific rationality that is based dogmatically on, among other things, the opposition analytic-synthetic.
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  17. Simon Evnine, Old Evidence Again.
    A critique of Mark Kaplan's attempt to solve the problem of old evidence by restricting the principle of when something is evidence explicitly to cases in which we are less than certain of it.
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  18. Anne Fagot-Largeault, The Legend of Philosophy's Striptease: Trends in Philoosphy of Science.
    The title is meant to tease the reader and attract his/her curiosity, but the question behind the teasing is serious. The reader will gently excuse the unconventional gait of a chapter that originated as an invited lecture given in Paris, at the HOPOS 2006 June conference. Doing philosophy of science requires having been trained both in philosophy and in (at least some) science. That is already a challenge. Studying the history of philosophy of science (which is what "hopos" means) might (...)
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  19. Menachem Fisch & Robert C. Richardson (1994). William Whewell Philosopher of Sciences. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 16 (1):155.
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  20. Mathias Frisch (2009). Causality and Dispersion: A Reply to John Norton. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (3):487 - 495.
    Classical dispersion relations are derived from a time-asymmetric constraint. I argue that the standard causal interpretation of this constraint plays a scientifically legitimate role in dispersion theory, and hence provides a counterexample to the causal skepticism advanced by John Norton and others. Norton ([2009]) argues that the causal interpretation of the time-asymmetric constraint is an empty honorific and that the constraint can be motivated by purely non-causal considerations. In this paper I respond to Norton's criticisms and argue that Norton's skepticism (...)
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  21. Joanna Gęgotek (2011). On Partial Truths in Science. Some Remarks on Susan Haack's The Whole Truth and Nothing but the Truth. Filozofia Nauki 4.
    The article is a commentary to Susan Haack’s The Whole Truth and Nothing but the Truth. It consists of two parts. In the first one some doubts about Haack’s conception of partiality of truth are formulated. However, Haack’s concept of truth is treated as one of the assumptions and not brought up for discussion. In the second part of the article a simple typology of possible sources of truth’s partiality in science is presented. The list includes deliberate and unintentional omissions, (...)
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  22. Carl Gillett (2006). Special Sciences. In D. Borchert (ed.), Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Macmillan Reference.
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  23. Steven Gimbel & Jeffrey Maynes (2011). Ordinary Language and the Unordinary Philosophy of Peter Achinstein. In Gregory J. Morgan (ed.), Philosophy of Science Matters: The Philosophy of Peter Achinstein. Oxford University Press. 1.
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  24. Wenceslao J. Gonzalez (2012). Methodological Universalism in Science and its Limits Imperialism Versus Complexity. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 100 (1):155-175.
    Universalism in science, when conceived in methodological terms, leads to the problem of the limits of science. On the one hand, there is “methodological imperialism” which in principle involves a form of universalism. On the other hand, there is the multivariate complexity – structural and dynamic, as well as epistemological and ontological – which represents a huge problem for methodological universalism, as may be seen with the obstacles for scientific prediction. Within the context of the limits of science, there is (...)
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  25. Alison Gopnik & Laura Schulz (eds.) (2007). Causal Learning: Psychology, Philosophy, and Computation. Oxford University Press.
    Understanding causal structure is a central task of human cognition. Causal learning underpins the development of our concepts and categories, our intuitive theories, and our capacities for planning, imagination and inference. During the last few years, there has been an interdisciplinary revolution in our understanding of learning and reasoning: Researchers in philosophy, psychology, and computation have discovered new mechanisms for learning the causal structure of the world. This new work provides a rigorous, formal basis for theory theories of concepts and (...)
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  26. Barbara Helm (1994). Sandra Harding (Hg.): The "Racial" Economy of Science. Die Philosophin 5 (9):101-105.
  27. Alexander Hieke & Hannes Leitgeb (eds.) (2008). Reduction and Elimination in Philosophy and the Sciences: Papers of the 31th International Wittgenstein Symposium, August 10 - 16, 2008, Kirchberg Am Wechsel. [REVIEW] Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society.
  28. Robert Hollinger (1975). Can a Scientific Theory Be Legitimately Criticized, Rejected, Condemned, or Suppressed on Ethical or Political Grounds? Journal of Value Inquiry 9 (4):303-306.
  29. Catherine Hundleby (2008). Scandalous Knowledge: Science, Truth, and the Humanby Barbara Herrnstein Smith. Hypatia 23 (4):233-237.
  30. Kristen Intemann (2010). Sciences From Below: Feminisms, Postcolonialities, and Modernities. By SANDRA HARDING. Hypatia 25 (2):464-469.
  31. John Kadvany (1996). Reason in History: Paul Feyerabend's Autobiography. Inquiry 39 (1):141 – 146.
    This review was prompted by the publication of Paul Feyerabend's autobiography Killing Time, just following his sudden death in 1994.
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  32. Hannes Leitgeb (2013). Scientific Philosophy, Mathematical Philosophy, and All That. Metaphilosophy 44 (3):267-275.
    This article suggests that scientific philosophy, especially mathematical philosophy, might be one important way of doing philosophy in the future. Along the way, the article distinguishes between different types of scientific philosophy; it mentions some of the scientific methods that can serve philosophers; it aims to undermine some worries about mathematical philosophy; and it tries to make clear why in certain cases the application of mathematical methods is necessary for philosophical progress.
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  33. Pete Mandik & William Bechtel (2002). Philosophy of Science. In Lynn Nadel (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Macmillan.
    00192001 Philosophy of science is primarily concernedto provide accounts of the principles and processes of scientific explanation. Early in the twentieth century, philosophers of science focusedon the logical structure of scientific thought, whereas in the later part of the century logic was de-emphasized in favour of other frameworks for conceptualizing scientific reasoning andexplanation, andan emphasis on historical andsociological factors that shape scientific thinking. While tracing through the landmarks of this history we note many points of contact between the philosophy of (...)
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  34. M. L. Martinez (2009). Ian Hacking's Proposal for the Distinction Between Natural and Social Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 39 (2):212-234.
    This article explores the proposal offered by Ian Hacking for the distinction between natural and social sciences—a proposal that he has defined from the outset as complex and different from the traditional ones. Our objective is not only to present the path followed by Hacking’s distinction, but also to determine if it constitutes a novelty or not. For this purpose, we deemed it necessary to briefly introduce the core notions Hacking uses to establish his strategic approach to social sciences, under (...)
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  35. Sergey F. Martynovich (2008). Philosophy of Science as the Object of Metaphilosophical Investigations. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 46:63-74.
    Philosophy of science is the object of metaphilosophical investigations. Metaphilosophy is the philosophy of philosophy. Philosophy is an archetypical thinking of being or an experience-of-being. History of Greek-European tradition of philosophy has three archetypes of thinking: objectivity, subjectivity, and inter-subjectivity. They are three archetypical contexts of interpretations of the concept of a philosophy of science too. Is philosophy of science part of philosophy? Is philosophy ofscience part of epistemology? What are methods of philosophy of science? These questions are the topics (...)
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  36. Thomas Mormann (2014). Matthias Neuber: Die Grenzen des Revisionismus: Schlick, Cassirer und das "Raumproblem". [REVIEW] Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 68 (1):127 - 131.
  37. Thomas Mormann (2014). On the Vicissitudes of Idealism in Philosophy of Science: The Case of Cassirer's 'Critical Idealism'. Lectiones Et Acroases Philosophicae (1).
    In Anglo-Saxon philosophy of science there is strong conviction that idealist philosophy of science on the the one hand and serious science and philosophy of science on the other do not go well together. In this paper I argue that this sweeping dismissal of the idealist tradition may have been too hasty. They may be some valuable insights for which it is striving. A promising case in question is provided by Ernst Cassirer’s Neo-Kantian „Critical Idealism“ that he put forward in (...)
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  38. Colleen Murphy, Paolo Gardoni & Charles Harris (2011). Classification and Moral Evaluation of Uncertainties in Engineering Modeling. Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (3):553-570.
    Engineers must deal with risks and uncertainties as a part of their professional work and, in particular, uncertainties are inherent to engineering models. Models play a central role in engineering. Models often represent an abstract and idealized version of the mathematical properties of a target. Using models, engineers can investigate and acquire understanding of how an object or phenomenon will perform under specified conditions. This paper defines the different stages of the modeling process in engineering, classifies the various sources of (...)
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  39. Alfred Nordmann, Hans Radder & Gregor Schiemann (eds.) (2011). Science Transformed?: Debating Claims of an Epochal Break. University of Pittsburgh Press.
    This edited volume presents an in-depth examination of these issues from philosophical, historical, social, and cultural perspectives.
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  40. John O'Neill (1988). Marcuse, Husserl and the Crisis of the Sciences. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 18 (3):327-342.
  41. Stathis Psillos (2012). What is General Philosophy of Science? Journal for General Philosophy of Science 43 (1):93-103.
    The very idea of a general philosophy of science relies on the assumption that there is this thing called science—as opposed to the various individual sciences. In this programmatic piece I make a case for the claim that general philosophy of science is the philosophy of science in general or science as such. Part of my narrative makes use of history, for two reasons. First, general philosophy of science is itself characterised by an intellectual tradition which aimed to develop a (...)
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  42. Athanassios Raftopoulos (1999). Newton's Experimental Proofs as Eliminative Reasoning. Erkenntnis 50 (1):91-121.
    In this paper I discuss Newton's first optical paper. My aim is to examine the type of argument which Newton uses in order to convince his readers of the truth of his theory of colors. My claim is that this argument is an induction by elimination, and that the Newtonian method of justification is a kind of generative justification, a term due to T. Nickles. To achieve my aim I analyze in some detail the arguments in Newton's first optical paper, (...)
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  43. Lisa Randall (2011). Knocking on Heaven's Door: How Physics and Scientific Thinking Illuminate the Universe and the Modern World. Ecco.
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  44. Martin J. Rees (2011). From Here to Infinity: Scientific Horizons. Profile Books.
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  45. Oliver L. Reiser (1936). Review: Aristotle, Galileo and the Leaning Towers of Science. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 3 (4):545 - 548.
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  46. Silvi Salupere (2011). Semiotics as Science. Sign Systems Studies 39 (2-4):271-289.
    The present article gives an overview of different approaches on semiotics as science, its objects of investigation, methods and genesis (where, how and when does semiotics begin?). The author does not aim at establishing one prescriptive approach. Quite the opposite, by leaving the question open, the author aspiresto encourage further discussion about the criteria for scientificity, establishing the borders of scientific disciplines, and the productivity of the dialogic (or, rather,polylogic) scientific meta-discourse in science in general and in semiotics in particular.
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  47. Gregor Schiemann & Kristian Köchy (eds.) (2006). Natur im Labor. Themenschwerpunkt in Philosophia Naturalis Bd. 43, Heft 1-2. Klostermann..
    Seit Beginn der frühen Neuzeit ist das naturwissenschaftliche Verfahren maßgeblich durch ein neues Konzept geprägt: das Konzept des experimentellen, gestalterischen Eingriffs in die Natur. Es geht nun nicht mehr darum, eine Geschichte der "freien und ungebundenen Natur" (Bacon) zu erzählen, die in ihrem eigenen Lauf belassen und als vollkommene Bildung betrachtet wird. Es geht vielmehr darum, der "gebundenen und bezwungenen Natur" (Bacon) vermittels der experimentellen Tätigkeit des Menschen die Geheimnisse zu entreißen. Diese technisch-praktische Konzeption grenzt sich explizit von den klassischen (...)
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  48. Samuel Schindler (2011). Bogen and Woodward's Data-Phenomena Distinction, Forms of Theory-Ladenness, and the Reliability of Data. Synthese 182 (1):39-55.
    Some twenty years ago, Bogen and Woodward challenged one of the fundamental assumptions of the received view, namely the theory-observation dichotomy and argued for the introduction of the further category of scientific phenomena. The latter, Bogen and Woodward stressed, are usually unobservable and inferred from what is indeed observable, namely scientific data. Crucially, Bogen and Woodward claimed that theories predict and explain phenomena, but not data. But then, of course, the thesis of theory-ladenness, which has it that our observations are (...)
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  49. Gerhard Schurz & Georg J. W. Dorn (1993). Die Entwicklung der Wissenschaftstheorie in Österreich 1971–1990. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 24 (2):315 - 347.
    Our report and bibliography concentrate on research in the philosophy of science carried out in Austria within the last 20 years. The term 'philosophy of science' is here to be understood in the broad sense of 'Wissenschaftstheorie', that is, syntactics, semantics and pragmatics of the natural sciences and of the humanities, including law. After a general introduction to the philosophy of science scene in Austria, we report about those institutions in Austria at which relevant research has been conducted, starting with (...)
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  50. Markus Seidel (2013). Why the Epistemic Relativist Cannot Use the Sceptic's Strategy. A Comment on Sankey. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (1):134-139.
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