Bookmark and Share

General Philosophy of Science

Edited by Howard Sankey (University of Melbourne)
Most recently added entries found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 56
  1. added 2015-07-29
    Todd Davies, Analogy.
    This essay (my undergraduate honors thesis at Stanford, issued by the Center for the Study of Language and Information in November 1985) constructs a theory of analogy as it applies to argumentation and reasoning, especially as used in fields such as philosophy and law. The word analogy has been used in different senses, which the essay defines. The theory developed herein applies to analogia rationis, or analogical reasoning. Building on the framework of situation theory, a type of logical relation called (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. added 2015-07-29
    Todd R. Davies & Stuart J. Russell (1987). A Logical Approach to Reasoning by Analogy. In John P. McDermott (ed.), Proceedings of the 10th International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence (IJCAI'87). Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, Inc. 264-270.
    We analyze the logical form of the domain knowledge that grounds analogical inferences and generalizations from a single instance. The form of the assumptions which justify analogies is given schematically as the "determination rule", so called because it expresses the relation of one set of variables determining the values of another set. The determination relation is a logical generalization of the different types of dependency relations defined in database theory. Specifically, we define determination as a relation between schemata of first (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. added 2015-07-28
    Ingo Brigandt (forthcoming). Do We Need a ‘Theory’ of Development? Biology and Philosophy:1-15.
    Edited by Alessandro Minelli and Thomas Pradeu, Towards a Theory of Development gathers essays by biologists and philosophers, which display a diversity of theoretical perspectives. The discussions not only cover the state of art, but broaden our vision of what development includes and provide pointers for future research. Interestingly, all contributors agree that explanations should not just be gene-centered, and virtually none use design and other engineering metaphors to articulate principles of cellular and organismal organization. I comment in particular on (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. added 2015-07-28
    Ingo Brigandt (forthcoming). Social Values Influence the Adequacy Conditions of Scientific Theories: Beyond Inductive Risk. Canadian Journal of Philosophy.
    The ‘death of evidence’ issue in Canada raises the specter of politicized science, and thus the question of what role social values may have in science and how this meshes with objectivity and evidence. I first criticize philosophical accounts that have to separate different steps of research to restrict the influence of social and other non-epistemic values. A prominent account that social values may play a role even in the context of theory acceptance is the argument from inductive risk. It (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. added 2015-07-28
    Olivier Sartenaer (2015). Emergent Evolutionism, Determinism and Unpredictability. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 51 (2):62-68.
    The fact that there exist in nature thoroughly deterministic systems whose future behavior cannot be predicted, no matter how advanced or fined-tune our cognitive and technical abilities turn out to be, has been well established over the last decades or so, essentially in the light of two different theoretical frameworks, namely chaos theory and (some deterministic interpretation of) quantum mechanics. The prime objective of this paper is to show that there actually exists an alternative strategy to ground the divorce between (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. added 2015-07-27
    Michael Lissack & Abraham Graber (eds.) (2014). Modes of Explanation: Affordances for Action and Prediction. Palgrave.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. added 2015-07-26
    Russ Abbott, Causality, Computing, and Complexity.
    I discuss two categories of causal relationships: primitive causal interactions of the sort characterized by Phil Dowe and the more general manipulable causal relationships as defined by James Woodward. All primitive causal interactions are manipulable causal relationships, but there are manipulable causal relationships that are not primitive causal interactions. I’ll call the latter constructed causal relationships, and I’ll argue that constructed causal relationships serve as a foundation for both computing and complex systems. -/- Perhaps even more interesting are autonomous causal (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. added 2015-07-24
    Lydia Patton (2015). Incommensurability and the Bonfire of the Meta-Theories: Response to Mizrahi. Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 4 (7):51-58.
    Scientists working within a paradigm must play by the rules of the game of that paradigm in solving problems, and that is why incommensurability arises when the rules of the game change. If we deny the thesis of the priority of paradigms, then there is no good argument for the incommensurability of theories and thus for taxonomic incommensurability, because there is no invariant way to determine the set of results provable, puzzles solvable, and propositions cogently formulable under a given paradigm.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. added 2015-07-21
    Ioan Muntean (2015). Structural Pluralism and S-Dualities: A Project in String Realism. In Romanian Studies in Philosophy of Science. Springer International Publishing 199-219.
    In string theory with S-dualities, there is an object-oriented realism and a structure-oriented realism. This paper discusses the advantages of “string structural realism”, a form of the latter, having a multi-aspected structure with a “model-oriented” pluralistic ontology, and grounded in the relation among fundamental objects of various string models.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. added 2015-07-21
    Alyssa Ney (2014). Review of Steven French * The Structure of the World. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2014.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. added 2015-07-21
    Ioan Muntean (2008). Mechanisms of Unification in Kaluza-Klein Theory. In D. Dieks (ed.), Ontology of Spacetime.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. added 2015-07-13
    Lajos L. Brons (2015). Anarchism as Metaphilosophy. The Science of Mind 53:139-158.
    Philosophy once started as the critical reflection on relatively ordinary human concerns. Increasing specialization has moved the discipline farther and farther away from these concerns, however, undermining its relevance outside the academy, but has also resulting in an ever increasing fragmentation. This fragmentation has further divided the field into a large number of esoteric communities that hardly understand each other. "Further divided", because philosophy was already divided into schools and traditions that seem to speak mutually unintelligible languages. In addition to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. added 2015-07-11
    Kenneth R. Westphal (forthcoming). Causal Realism and the Limits of Empiricism: Some Unexpected Insights From Hegel. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science:000-000.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. added 2015-07-11
    Patrick R. Frierson (forthcoming). Maria Montessori’s Philosophy of Experimental Psychology. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science:000-000.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. added 2015-07-10
    Guillaume Rochefort-Maranda (forthcoming). On the Correct Interpretation of P Values and the Importance of Random Variables. Synthese:1-17.
    The p value is the probability under the null hypothesis of obtaining an experimental result that is at least as extreme as the one that we have actually obtained. That probability plays a crucial role in frequentist statistical inferences. But if we take the word ‘extreme’ to mean ‘improbable’, then we can show that this type of inference can be very problematic. In this paper, I argue that it is a mistake to make such an interpretation. Under minimal assumptions about (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. added 2015-07-10
    Seungbae Park (2015). Accepting Our Best Scientific Theories. Filosofija. Sociologija 26 (3):218-227.
    Dawes (2013) claims that we ought not to believe but to accept our best scientific theories. To accept them means to employ them as premises in our reasoning with the goal of attaining knowledge about unobservables. I reply that if we do not believe our best scientific theories, we cannot gain knowledge about unobservables, our opponents might dismiss the predictions derived from them, and we cannot use them to explain phenomena. We commit an unethical speech act when we explain a (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. added 2015-07-09
    Gregory Reed, Mikel Petty, Nicholaos Jones, Anthony Morris, John Ballenger & Harry Delugach (forthcoming). A Principles-Based Model of Ethical Considerations in Military Decision Making. Journal of Defense Modeling and Simulation.
    When comparing alternative courses of action, modern military decision makers often must consider both the military effectiveness and the ethical consequences of the available alternatives. The basis, design, calibration, and performance of a principles-based computational model of ethical considerations in military decision making are reported in this article. The relative ethical violation (REV) model comparatively evaluates alternative military actions based upon the degree to which they violate contextually relevant ethical principles. It is based on a set of specific ethical principles (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. added 2015-07-08
    Marvin E. Kirsh (2015). The Spaces in the Looking Glass: Stilling the Frame/ Framing the Still. Philosophy and Cosmology Http://En.Bazaluk.Com/Journals 15:62-83.
    The purpose of this writing is to propose a frame of view, a form as the eternal world element, that is compatible with paradox within the history of ideas, modern discovery as they confront one another. Under special consideration are problems of representation of phenomena, life, the cosmos as the rational facility of mind confronts the physical/perceptual, and itself. Current topics in pursuit are near as diverse and numbered as are the possibilities for a world composed strictly of uniqueness able (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. added 2015-07-08
    Siegfried Jaag, Explaining Laws of Nature: A Metaphysical Investigation Into the Natural Principles Governing the Universe.
  20. added 2015-07-07
    Jeff Kochan (2015). Circles of Scientific Practice: Regressus, Mathēsis, Denkstil. In Dimitri Ginev (ed.), Critical Science Studies after Ludwik Fleck. St. Kliment Ohridski University Press 83-99.
    Hermeneutic studies of science locate a circle at the heart of scientific practice: scientists only gain knowledge of what they, in some sense, already know. This may seem to threaten the rational validity of science, but one can argue that this circle is a virtuous rather than a vicious one. A virtuous circle is one in which research conclusions are already present in the premises, but only in an indeterminate and underdeveloped way. In order to defend the validity of science, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. added 2015-07-03
    Robert Arp, Barry Smith & Andrew Spear (forthcoming). Building Ontologies with Basic Formal Ontology. MIT Press, August 7, 2015.
    In the era of “big data,” science is increasingly information driven, and the potential for computers to store, manage, and integrate massive amounts of data has given rise to such new disciplinary fields as biomedical informatics. Applied ontology offers a strategy for the organization of scientific information in computer-tractable form, drawing on concepts not only from computer and information science but also from linguistics, logic, and philosophy. This book provides an introduction to the field of applied ontology that is of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. added 2015-07-01
    Caleb Dewey & Garri Hovhannisyan, Inductive Theories Are Cognitive Metaphors.
    For decades, metaphors have been known to be very important within science. Recently, Brown (2008) strengthened their importance so far as to argue that all scientific models are metaphors (in the cognitive sense). We stretch their importance even further to say that all scientific theories are cognitive metaphors as long as those theories are yielded by a coherent account of induction. Since standard induction is incoherent, as per Hume and Duhem, we primarily concern ourselves with defining a coherent account of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. added 2015-06-28
    Chris F. Taylor, Dawn Field, Susanna-Assunta Sansone, Jan Aerts, Rolf Apweiler, Michael Ashburner, Catherine A. Ball, Pierre-Alain Binz, Molly Bogue, Tim Booth, Alvis Brazma, Ryan R. Brinkman, Adam Michael Clark, Eric W. Deutsch, Oliver Fiehn & Jennifer Fostel, Promoting Coherent Minimum Reporting Guidelines for Biological and Biomedical Investigations: The MIBBI Project.
    Throughout the biological and biomedical sciences there is a growing need for, prescriptive ‘minimum information’ (MI) checklists specifying the key information to include when reporting experimental results are beginning to find favor with experimentalists, analysts, publishers and funders alike. Such checklists aim to ensure that methods, data, analyses and results are described to a level sufficient to support the unambiguous interpretation, sophisticated search, reanalysis and experimental corroboration and reuse of data sets, facilitating the extraction of maximum value from data sets (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. added 2015-06-27
    Robert J. Rovetto, Defending Spaceflight - The Echoes of Apollo.
    This paper defends, and emphasizes the importance of, spaceflight, broadly construed to include human and unmanned spaceflight, space science, exploration and development. I specifically provide counter-replies to remarks by Dr. Steven Weinberg against human spaceflight. In this defense of peaceful spaceflight I draw upon a variety of sources. Although a focus is human spaceflight, human and unmanned modes must not be treated as an either-or opposition. Rather, each has a critical role to play in moving humanity forward as a spacefaring (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. added 2015-06-26
    Axel Gelfert (2015). Symbol Systems as Collective Representational Resources: Mary Hesse, Nelson Goodman, and the Problem of Scientific Representation. Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 4 (6):52-61.
    This short paper grew out of an observation—made in the course of a larger research project—of a surprising convergence between, on the one hand, certain themes in the work of Mary Hesse and Nelson Goodman in the 1950/60s and, on the other hand, recent work on the representational resources of science, in particular regarding model-based representation. The convergence between these more recent accounts of representation in science and the earlier proposals by Hesse and Goodman consists in the recognition that, in (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. added 2015-06-26
    Spencer Phillips Hey (2015). Judging Quality and Coordination in Biomarker Diagnostic Development. Theoria. An International Journal for Theory, History and Foundations of Science 30 (2):207-227.
    What makes a high-quality biomarker experiment? The success of personalized medicine hinges on the answer to this question. In this paper, I argue that judgment about the quality of biomarker experiments is mediated by the problem of theoretical underdetermination. That is, the network of biological and pathophysiological theories motivating a biomarker experiment is sufficiently complicated that it often frustrates valid interpretation of the experimental results. Drawing on a case-study in biomarker diagnostic development from neurooncology, I argue that this problem of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. added 2015-06-26
    Jeff Kochan (2015). Scientific Practice and Epistemic Modes of Existence. In Dimitri Ginev (ed.), Debating Cognitive Existentialism: Values and Orientations in Hermeneutic Philosophy of Science. Brill
    Proponents of practice-based accounts of science usually reject theory-based accounts, and seek to explain scientific theory reductively in terms of practice. I consider two examples: Dimitri Ginev and Joseph Rouse. Both draw inspiration from Martin Heidegger’s existential conception of science. And both allege that Heidegger ultimately betrayed his insight that theory can be reduced to practice when he sought to explain modern science in terms of a theory-based “mathematical projection of nature.” I argue that Heidegger believed neither that theory can (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. added 2015-06-23
    Franck Varenne, Pierre Chaigneau, Jean Petitot & René Doursat (2015). Programming the Emergence in Morphogenetically Architected Systems. Acta Biotheoretica 63 (3).
    Large sets of elements interacting locally and producing specific architectures reliably form a category that transcends the usual dividing line between biological and engineered systems. We propose to call them morphogenetically architected complex systems (MACS). While taking the emergence of properties seriously, the notion of MACS enables at the same time the design (or “meta-design”) of operational means that allow controlling and even, paradoxically, programming this emergence. To demonstrate our claim, we first show that among all the self-organized systems studied (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. added 2015-06-21
    John N. Williams & Eric W. K. Tsang (2015). Classifying Generalization: Paradigm War or Abuse of Terminology? Journal of Information Technology 30 (1):18-19.
    Lee and Baskerville (2003) attempted to clarify the concept of generalization and classify it into four types. In Tsang and Williams (2012) we objected to their account of generalization as well as their classification and offered repairs. Then we proposed a classification of induction, within which we distinguished five types of generalization. In their (2012) rejoinder, they argue that their classification is compatible with ours, claiming that theirs offers a ‘new language.’ Insofar as we resist this ‘new language’ and insofar (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. added 2015-06-16
    Ray Scott Percival (1995). Science Evolving. [REVIEW] Nature 376 (6536):131-132.
    MICHAEL Ruse aims to describe what scientists actually do in their research and how they arrive at their theories — a mixed bag of false starts, fallacious reasoning, the cultivation of followers, the marketing of ideas and so on. His approach, evolutionary naturalism, rejects the traditional distinction between the normative and the descriptive analysis of science. For him the path of discovery to, say, Darwin's theory of natural selection makes a difference to the theory itself, whereas for the normative analyst (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. added 2015-06-16
    Ray Scott Percival (1994). Natural Selections. [REVIEW] Nature 371 (6499):666-667.
    How do you put both physicists and biologists on their guard? Answer: propound a philosophical theory that ignores Darwin's demolition of essentialism in species and brands any physicist who denies your theory of natural kinds as an anti-realist. A traditional division in philosophy is between metaphysics (what sorts of things exist) and epistemology (what and how we know). Some think that the core of realism is the metaphysical assumption that there is a world independent of our minds. But this core (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. added 2015-06-15
    Marco Viola (2015). Some Remarks on the Division of Cognitive Labor. RT. A Journal on Research Policy and Evaluation 3.
    Since the publication of Kitcher’s influential paper The Division of Cognitive Labor, some philosophers wondered about these two related issues: (1) which is the optimal distribution of cognitive efforts among rival methods within a scientific community?, and (2) whether and how can a community achieve such an optimal distribution? Though not committing to any specific answer to question (1), I claim that issue (2) does not depend exclusively on an invisible hand like mechanism, since both intra-scientific and extra-scientific institutions may (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. added 2015-06-07
    Alcibiades Malapi-Nelson (2014). Humanities’ Metaphysical Underpinnings of Late Frontier Scientific Research. Humanities 214 (3):740-765.
    The behavior/structure methodological dichotomy as locus of scientific inquiry is closely related to the issue of modeling and theory change in scientific explanation. Given that the traditional tension between structure and behavior in scientific modeling is likely here to stay, considering the relevant precedents in the history of ideas could help us better understand this theoretical struggle. This better understanding might open up unforeseen possibilities and new instantiations, particularly in what concerns the proposed technological modification of the human condition. The (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. added 2015-06-07
    Alcibiades Malapi-Nelson (2013). Book Review: Steve Fuller, Humanity 2.0:What It Means to Be Human Past, Present and Future. [REVIEW] International Sociology Review of Books 28 (2):240-247.
    Sociology professor Steve Fuller’s latest book deals with contemporary treatments of the notion of ‘the human’, with an eye set on its future developments, anchored on disruptively pervasive technologies that are already being felt. A contextual account of its historical unfolding is provided, so that the reader can locate the evolution of the notion within the bigger setting of the evolving philosophical landscape in the West.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. added 2015-06-05
    Andrew Naylor (2015). Inferentially Remembering That P. Logos and Episteme 6 (2):225-230.
    Most of our memories are inferential, so says Sven Bernecker in Memory: A Philosophical Study. I show that his account of inferentially remembering that p is too strong. A revision of the account that avoids the difficulty is proposed. Since inferential memory that p is memory that q (a proposition distinct from p) with an admixture of inference from one’s memory that q and a true thought one has that r, its analysis presupposes an adequate account of the (presumably non-inferential) (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. added 2015-05-29
    Juha Saatsi (forthcoming). On Explanations From 'Geometry of Motion'. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
    This paper examines explanations that turn on non-local geometrical facts about the space of possible configurations a system can occupy. I argue that it makes sense to contrast such explanations from "geometry of motion" with causal explanations. I also explore how my analysis of these explanations cuts across the distinction between kinematics and dynamics.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. added 2015-05-28
    Seungbae Park (2015). Explanatory Failures of Relative Realism. Epistemologia 38:16-28.
    Scientific realism (Putnam 1975; Psillos 1999) and relative realism (Mizrahi 2013) claim that successful scientific theories are approximately true and comparatively true, respectively. A theory is approximately true if and only if it is close to the truth. A theory is comparatively true if and only if it is closer to the truth than its competitors are. I argue that relative realism is more skeptical about the claims of science than it initially appears to be and that it can explain (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. added 2015-05-27
    Raphaël Fiorese (forthcoming). Stoljar’s Dilemma and Three Conceptions of the Physical: A Defence of the Via Negativa. Erkenntnis:1-29.
    Physicalism is the thesis that everything is physical. But what does it mean to say that everything is physical? Daniel Stoljar has recently argued that no account of the physical is available which allows for a formulation of physicalism that is both possibly true and deserving of the name. As against this claim, I argue that a version of the via negativa—roughly, the view that the physical is to be characterised in terms of the nonmental—provides just such an account.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. added 2015-05-26
    Boaz Miller (forthcoming). What is Hacking's Argument for Entity Realism? ‎. Synthese:1-16.
    According to Ian Hacking’s Entity Realism, unobservable entities that scientists carefully ‎manipulate to study other phenomena are real. Although Hacking presents his case in an intuitive, ‎attractive, and persuasive way, his argument remains elusive. I present five possible readings of ‎Hacking’s argument: a no-miracle argument, an indispensability argument, a transcendental ‎argument, a Vichian argument, and a non-argument. I elucidate Hacking’s argument according to ‎each reading, and review their strengths, their weaknesses, and their compatibility with each other.‎.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. added 2015-05-25
    Seungbae Park (forthcoming). Realism Versus Surrealism. Foundations of Science:1-12.
    Realism and surrealism claim, respectively, that a scientific theory is successful because it is true, and because the world operates as if it is true. Lyons (2003) criticizes realism and argues that surrealism is superior to realism. I reply that Lyons’s criticisms against realism fail. I also attempt to establish the following two claims: 1. Realism and surrealism lead to a useful prescription and a useless prescription, respectively, on how to make an unsuccessful theory successful. 2. Realism and surrealism give (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. added 2015-05-25
    Robert B. Brandom (2015). From Empiricism to Expressivism. Harvard University Press.
  42. added 2015-05-22
    A. Teicher (forthcoming). Racial Zigzags: Visualizing Racial Deviancy in German Physical Anthropology During the 20th Century. History of the Human Sciences.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. added 2015-05-22
    N. Langlitz (forthcoming). On a Not so Chance Encounter of Neurophilosophy and Science Studies in a Sleep Laboratory. History of the Human Sciences.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. added 2015-05-19
    K. Brad Wray (2015). Kuhn’s Social Epistemology and the Sociology of Science. In William J. Devlin & Alisa Bokulich (eds.), Kuhn's Structure of Scientific Revolutions - 50 Years On. Springer 167-183.
    I aim to clarify the relationship between Kuhn’s social epistemology of science and the sociology of science, and the nature of Kuhn’s positive legacy to the philosophy of science. I begin by recounting Kuhn’s relationship to the sociology of science. First, I examine the influence of sociology of science on Structure. Surprisingly, sociology of science had very little influence on Kuhn as he wrote Structure. Second, I examine early responses to Kuhn’s work by sociologists of science. Both the Mertonians and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. added 2015-05-17
    Hennie Lotter (1995). Postmodernism and Our Understanding of Science. In Deon Rossouw (ed.), Life in a postmodern culture. Human Sciences Research Council Press
    Despite the flood of philosophical texts on postmodernism, relatively few attempts have been made to gauge the importance of postmodern ideas for the philosophy of science. However, Lyotard's enormously influential text The postmodern condition (1979) focussed on science and knowledge. He put the term metanarrative (grand narrative) into circulation. Lyotard defines the term modern to refer to the way in which science tries to legitimate its own status by means of philosophical discourse which appeal to some kind of grand narrative (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. added 2015-05-16
    Jeff Kochan (2015). Objective Styles in Northern Field Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 52:1-12.
    Social studies of science have often treated natural field sites as extensions of the laboratory. But this overlooks the unique specificities of field sites. While lab sites are usually private spaces with carefully controlled borders, field sites are more typically public spaces with fluid boundaries and diverse inhabitants. Field scientists must therefore often adapt their work to the demands and interests of local agents. I propose to address the difference between lab and field in sociological terms, as a difference in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. added 2015-05-15
    Moti Mizrahi (forthcoming). Historical Inductions, Unconceived Alternatives, and Unconceived Objections. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie:1-10.
    In this paper, I outline a reductio against Stanford’s “New Induction” on the History of Science, which is an inductive argument against scientific realism that is based on what Stanford (2006) calls “the Problem of Unconceived Alternatives” (PUA). From the supposition that Stanford’s New Induction on the History of Science is cogent, and the parallel New Induction on the History of Philosophy (Mizrahi 2014), it follows that scientific antirealism is not worthy of belief. I also show that denying a key (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. added 2015-05-14
    Danny Frederick, A Regimented and Concise Exposition of Karl Popper’s Critical Rationalist Epistemology.
  49. added 2015-05-10
    Daniel C. Burnston, Benjamin Sheredos, Adele Abrahamsen & William Bechtel (forthcoming). Scientists' Use of Diagrams in Developing Mechanistic Explanations: A Case Study From Chronobiology. Pragmatics and Cognition.
  50. added 2015-05-09
    Sergio A. Gallegos (2015). Are the Empirical and Materialist Stances Really Compatible? Southwest Philosophy Review 31 (1):129-137.
    In a recent paper, Ladyman (2011) has argued that the empirical stance, which has been championed by Van Fraassen (2002), and the materialist stance are compatible with each other –a thesis which is important for Ladyman since it paves the way for the project of developing a ‘radically naturalized metaphysics’ that he has defended along with Ross (2007). Though Ladyman puts forth a compelling case for the thesis that the two stances are compatible, I find his argument for the thesis (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 56