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General Philosophy of Science

Edited by Howard Sankey (University of Melbourne)
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  1. added 2016-09-21
    Reutlinger Alexander & Andersen Holly (forthcoming). Abstract Versus Causal Explanations? International Studies in the Philosophy of Science.
    In the recent literature on causal and non-causal scientific explanations, there is an intuitive assumption (which we call the ‘abstractness assumption’) according to which an explanation is non-causal by virtue of being abstract. In this context, to be “abstract” means that the explanans in question leaves out many or almost all causal microphysical details of the target system. After motivating this assumption, we argue that the abstractness assumption, in placing the abstract and the causal character of an explanation in tension, (...)
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  2. added 2016-09-21
    Timothy Williamson (2016). Reply to Sider. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 46 (4-5):699-708.
  3. added 2016-09-21
    Timothy Williamson (2016). Modal Science. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 46 (4-5):453-492.
    This paper explains and defends the idea that metaphysical necessity is the strongest kind of objective necessity. Plausible closure conditions on the family of objective modalities are shown to entail that the logic of metaphysical necessity is S5. Evidence is provided that some objective modalities are studied in the natural sciences. In particular, the modal assumptions implicit in physical applications of dynamical systems theory are made explicit by using such systems to define models of a modal temporal logic. Those assumptions (...)
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  4. added 2016-09-20
    Emma Ruttkamp (2011). Editorial Preface. South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (1):i-iii.
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  5. added 2016-09-20
    Emma Ruttkamp (2002). A Model-Theoretic Realist Interpretation of Science. Kluwer.
    In this book Emma Ruttkamp demonstrates the power of the full-blown employment of the model-theoretic paradigm in the philosophy of science. Within this paradigm she gives an account of sciences as process and product. She expounds the "received statement" and the "non-statement" views of science, and shows how the model-theoretic approach resolves the spurious tension between these views. In this endeavour she also engages the views of a number of contemporary philosophers of science with affinity to model theory. This text (...)
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  6. added 2016-09-19
    Neal A. Tognazzini (forthcoming). Free Will and Miracles. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy.
    The Consequence Argument is sound only if no one has a choice about the laws of nature, and one prominent compatibilist reply to the argument – championed by David Lewis (1981) – begins by claiming that there is a sense in which we do have such a choice, and a sense in which we don’t. Lewis then insists that the sense in which we do have such a choice is the only sense required by compatibilism. Peter van Inwagen (2004) has (...)
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  7. added 2016-09-19
    Matthew J. Brown (2016). Love Slaves and Wonder Women: Radical Feminism and Social Reform in the Psychology of William Moulton Marston. Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 2 (1):1.
    In contemporary histories of psychology, William Moulton Marston is remembered for helping develop the lie detector test. He is better remembered in the history of popular culture for creating the comic book superhero Wonder Woman. In his time, however, he contributed to psychological research in deception, basic emotions, abnormal psychology, sexuality, and consciousness. He was also a radical feminist with connections to women's rights movements. Marston's work is an instructive case for philosophers of science on the relation between science and (...)
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  8. added 2016-09-19
    Matthew J. Brown (2010). Mark B. Brown.Science in Democracy: Expertise, Institutions, and Representation. Xiii + 354 Pp., Bibls., Index. Cambridge, Mass./London: MIT Press, 2009. $28. [REVIEW] Isis 101 (3):686-687.
  9. added 2016-09-16
    Nicholas Maxwell (2016). Two Great Problems of Learning: Science and Civilization. Rounded Globe.
    Two great problems of learning confront humanity: learning about the nature of the universe and about ourselves and other living things as a part of the universe, and learning how to become civilized. The first problem was solved, in essence, in the 17th century, with the creation of modern science. But the second problem has not yet been solved. Solving the first problem without also solving the second puts us in a situation of great danger. All our current global problems (...)
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  10. added 2016-09-16
    Sebastian Lutz (2015). What Was the Syntax‐Semantics Debate in the Philosophy of Science About? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 93 (2):n/a-n/a.
    The debate between critics of syntactic and semantic approaches to the formalization of scientific theories has been going on for over 50 years. I structure the debate in light of a recent exchange between Hans Halvorson, Clark Glymour, and Bas van Fraassen and argue that the only remaining disagreement concerns the alleged difference in the dependence of syntactic and semantic approaches on languages of predicate logic. This difference turns out to be illusory.
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  11. added 2016-09-15
    Jaana Eigi (2016). The Social Organisation of Science as a Question for Philosophy of Science. Dissertation, University of Tartu
    Philosophy of science is showing an increasing interest in the social aspects and the social organisation of science—the ways social values and social interactions and structures play a role in the creation of knowledge and the ways this role should be taken into account in the organisation of science and science policy. My thesis explores a number of issues related to this theme. I argue that a prominent approach to the social organisation of science—Philip Kitcher’s well-ordered science—runs into a number (...)
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  12. added 2016-09-13
    Ehud Lamm (forthcoming). Big Dreams for Small Creatures: Ilana and Eugene Rosenberg’s Path to the Hologenome Theory. In Oren Harman & Michael Dietrich (eds.), Dreamers, Visionaries, and Revolutionaries in the Life Sciences. Chicago University Press
    A biographical sketch of the Hologenome Theory.
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  13. added 2016-09-12
    Michael T. Stuart (forthcoming). Norton and the Logic of Thought Experiments. Axiomathes:1-16.
    John D. Norton defends an empiricist epistemology of thought experiments, the central thesis of which is that thought experiments are nothing more than arguments. Philosophers have attempted to provide counterexamples to this claim, but they haven’t convinced Norton. I will point out a more fundamental reason for reformulation that criticizes Norton’s claim that a thought experiment is a good one when its underlying logical form possesses certain desirable properties. I argue that by Norton’s empiricist standards, no thought experiment is ever (...)
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  14. added 2016-09-12
    Michael Morales (2010). Stroud's Humean Skepticism. Southwest Philosophical Studies 32:93-97.
    In “The Constraints of Hume’s Naturalism” Barry Stroud takes on the task of looking at Hume’s negative and positive accounts of induction in conjunction. Stroud goes about doing this so that we might walk away with “a more general lesson about naturalism, at least when it is indulged in for philosophical purposes”. Given the boldness of Stroud’s quote from above there should be some explicit talk of this general lesson about naturalism outside of Hume’s, but there is none that is (...)
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  15. added 2016-09-08
    Roberta L. Millstein (2015). GMOs? Not So Fast. Common Reader: A Journal of the Essay 1:33-46.
    Given the role of values in the deployment of GMOs, given the lack of mandatory and long-term testing of GMOs with outside oversight, and given the demonstrated environmental harms, it is not anti-science to want to GMOs labelled as GMOs. People who would like to avoid GMOs, whether out of concerns for potential health harms or concerns over actual environmental harms, are not being allowed to judge the risks and make choices for themselves and their families. For these reasons—so that (...)
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  16. added 2016-09-06
    Alex Worsnip (forthcoming). Explanatory Indispensability and Deliberative Indispensability: Against Enoch's Analogy. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy.
    In a crucial chapter of his important book "Taking Morality Seriously", David Enoch offers a highly inventive argument for metanormative realism, the view that there are objective irreducibly normative truths. The argument appeals to the idea that irreducibly normative truths are indispensable for deliberation. This, Enoch claims, justifies us in believing in irreducibly normative truths. In making this argument, Enoch draws upon an analogy with the indispensability of other entities for explanation, and the idea that we are justified in believing (...)
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  17. added 2016-09-05
    Max Bialek (forthcoming). Interest Relativism in the Best System Analysis of Laws. Synthese:1-13.
    Lewis’ Best System Analysis of laws of nature is often criticized on the grounds that what it means to be the “best” system is too subjective for an analysis of lawhood. Recent proponents of the BSA have embraced the view’s close connection to the particulars of scientific practice despite the objection. I distinguish two compatible versions of the objection: one opposed to mind or subject dependence and the other opposed to relativity. The BSA can answer both. Answering the anti-relative version (...)
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  18. added 2016-09-04
    Abelard Podgorski (2016). Dynamic Conservatism. Ergo, an Open Access Journal of Philosophy 3.
    According to a family of views under the label of epistemic conservatism, the fact that one already believes something can make it rational to continue to believe it. A number of philosophers have found conservatism attractive, but traditional views are vulnerable to several powerful criticisms. In this paper, I develop an alternative to standard views by identifying a widespread assumption shared by conservatives and their critics - that rational norms govern states of mind like belief, and showing how rejecting this (...)
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  19. added 2016-09-02
    Raymond Aaron Younis (forthcoming). Against Method, Against Science? On Logic, Order and Analogy in the Sciences. In Jeremy Horne (ed.), On logic and order in the sciences.
  20. added 2016-09-02
    Rani Lill Anjum (2016). Evidence Based or Person Centered? An Ontological Debate. European Journal for Person Centered Healthcare 4 (2):421-429.
    Evidence based medicine (EBM) is under critical debate, and person centered healthcare (PCH) has been proposed as an improvement. But is PCH offered as a supplement or as a replacement of EBM? Prima facie PCH only concerns the practice of medicine, while the contended features of EBM also include methods and medical model. I here argue that there are good philosophical reasons to see PCH as a radical alternative to the existing medical paradigm of EBM, since the two seem committed (...)
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  21. added 2016-09-01
    Subhasis Chattopadhyay (2016). Review of The Soul of the World. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (September):672-3.
    Roger Scruton is dismissed by those who do not care to study him as a conservative philosopher. This review shows how Scruton is in fact more a theologian than a philosopher. This review is contrarian in tone to the reviews of Scruton to be found online and restores him as the rightful heir to theologians like Barth, Bultmann etc.
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  22. added 2016-09-01
    Howard P. Honey, The Significance of a Law of Nature in Modern Science.
    The aim of this essay has been to present, in its most general and salient features, the origin and development of the proposed theme. In many cases authorities have been let speak for themselves; and although in quoting, the actual wording has often been modified for the sake of simplicity, clearness and continuity, the references have been given, so that the reader can easily refer to the originals. The writer has no wish to claim undue originality in the treatment of (...)
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  23. added 2016-08-31
    Alexander Skiles (forthcoming). Emergence Reinflated. Philosophical Quarterly.
    In ‘Collapsing Emergence’, Elanor Taylor argues that all accounts of emergence face a common problem: excluding ‘collapse-inducing’ features—features encoding information about macro-level phenomena—from the micro-level bases of putatively emergent phenomena in a metaphysically principled way. I argue that Taylor's solution to ‘the collapse problem’, which utilizes an explanation-based account of emergence she develops in recent work, does not succeed, as it relies on a false principle about the requirements for explanation. I then propose a better solution, one that presupposes no (...)
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  24. added 2016-08-30
    Douglas Campbell (2013). The Semimeasure Property of Algorithmic Probability -- “Feature‘ or “Bug‘? In David L. Dowe (ed.), Algorithmic Probability and Friends. Bayesian Prediction and Artificial Intelligence: Papers From the Ray Solomonoff 85th Memorial Conference, Melbourne, Vic, Australia, November 30 -- December 2, 2011. Springer Berlin Heidelberg 79--90.
    An unknown process is generating a sequence of symbols, drawn from an alphabet, A. Given an initial segment of the sequence, how can one predict the next symbol? Ray Solomonoff’s theory of inductive reasoning rests on the idea that a useful estimate of a sequence’s true probability of being outputted by the unknown process is provided by its algorithmic probability (its probability of being outputted by a species of probabilistic Turing machine). However algorithmic probability is a “semimeasure”: i.e., the sum, (...)
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  25. added 2016-08-30
    Alberto Pasquinelli (1953). La sociologia del neopositivismo. Scritti di Sociologia E Politica in Onore di Luigi Sturzo 3:31-50.
    Alberto Pasquinelli - Dottore in Filosofia nell'Università di Chicago "La sociologia del neopositivismo" -/- COMPENDIUM: Ut intellegatur, quomodo novus positivismus sociologiam definiat, novi positivismi doctrina breviter prius exponenda est. Quae, quamquam in pristino schemate varias variorum auctorum sententias comprehendit, et quasdam mutaverit, unam tamen retinet manifestissimam speciem, cuius liniamenta facile dispici possunt. In libro, qui novi positivismi doctrinam primus exposuit (inscribitur: Wissenschaftliche Weltauffassung: Der Wiener Kreis, Wien, 1929; id est: Scientifica rerum interpretatio: Circulus Vindobonensis), tres theses inveniuntur, de methodo, de (...)
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  26. added 2016-08-29
    Catherine Osborne (1983). Archimedes on the Dimensions of the Cosmos. Isis 74 (2):234-242.
  27. added 2016-08-28
    Tiziana Bascelli, Piotr Błaszczyk, Vladimir Kanovei, Karin U. Katz, Mikhail G. Katz, David M. Schaps & David Sherry (2016). Leibniz Versus Ishiguro: Closing a Quarter Century of Syncategoremania. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 6 (1):117-147.
    Did Leibniz exploit infinitesimals and infinities à la rigueur or only as shorthand for quantified propositions that refer to ordinary Archimedean magnitudes? Hidé Ishiguro defends the latter position, which she reformulates in terms of Russellian logical fictions. Ishiguro does not explain how to reconcile this interpretation with Leibniz’s repeated assertions that infinitesimals violate the Archimedean property (i.e., Euclid’s Elements, V.4). We present textual evidence from Leibniz, as well as historical evidence from the early decades of the calculus, to undermine Ishiguro’s (...)
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  28. added 2016-08-28
    Peter Olen (2016). From Formalism to Psychology: Metaphilosophical Studies in Wilfrid Sellars's Early Works. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 6 (1):24-63.
    When discussing Wilfrid Sellars’s philosophy, very little work has been done to offer a developmental account of his systematic views. More often than not, Sellars’s complex views are presented in a systematic and holistic fashion that ignores any periodization of his work. I argue that there is a metaphilosophical shift in Sellars’s early philosophy that results in substantive changes to his conception of language, linguistic rules, and normativity. Specifically, I claim that Sellars’s shift from a formalist metaphilosophy to one more (...)
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  29. added 2016-08-28
    Tributsch Helmut Helmuttributsch@Aliceit (2016). A Fundamentally Irreversible World as an Opportunity Towards a Consistent Understanding of Quantum and Cosmological Contexts. Lournal of Modern Physics 7:1455-1482.
    In a preceding publication a fundamentally oriented and irreversible world was shown to be de- rivable from the important principle of least action. A consequence of such a paradigm change is avoidance of paradoxes within a “dynamic” quantum physics. This becomes essentially possible because fundamental irreversibility allows consideration of the “entropy” concept in elementary processes. For this reason, and for a compensation of entropy in the spread out energy of the wave, the duality of particle and wave has to be (...)
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  30. added 2016-08-28
    Gary Hatfield (2001). René Descartes. In Steven M. Emmanuel (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Modern Philosophers: From Descartes to Nietzsche. Blackwell 1-27.
    An introduction to Descartes as a philosopher. Situates his philosophy within the context of Descartes' efforts to forge a new natural philosophy, including original work on the theory of the senses and the passions and emotions.
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  31. added 2016-08-26
    Cory Wright (forthcoming). Truth, Explanation, Minimalism. Synthese:1-23.
    Minimalists about truth contend that traditional inflationary theories systematically fail to explain certain facts about truth, and that this failure licenses a ‘reversal of explanatory direction’. Once reversed, they purport that their own minimal theory adequately explains all of the facts involving truth. But minimalists’ main objection to inflationism seems to misfire, and the subsequent reversal of explanatory direction, if it can be made sense of, leaves minimalism in no better explanatory position; and even if the objection were serviceable and (...)
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  32. added 2016-08-26
    Nathan Lackey & Cory Wright (2016). Review of Poincaré, Philosopher of Science. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 36 (4):157-159.
  33. added 2016-08-26
    Jan Baedke & Tobias Schöttler (2016). Visual Metaphors in the Sciences: The Case of Epigenetic Landscape Images. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie:1-22.
    Recent philosophical analyses of the epistemic dimension of images in the sciences show a certain trend in acknowledging potential roles of these images beyond their merely decorative or pedagogical functions. We argue, however, that this new debate has yet paid little attention to a special type of pictures, we call ‘visual metaphor’, and its versatile heuristic potential in organizing data, supporting communication, and guiding research, modeling, and theory formation. Based on a case study of Conrad Hal Waddington’s epigenetic landscape images (...)
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  34. added 2016-08-26
    K. Brad Wray (2016). Method and Continuity in Science. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 47 (2):363-375.
    Devitt has developed an interesting defense of realism against the threats posed by the Pessimistic Induction and the Argument from Unconceived Alternatives. Devitt argues that the best explanation for the success of our current theories, and the fact that they are superior to the theories they replaced, is that they were developed and tested with the aid of better methods than the methods used to develop and test the many theories that were discarded earlier in the history of science. It (...)
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  35. added 2016-08-26
    Pablo Lorenzano (2011). La filosofía de la ciencia y el lenguaje: relaciones cambiantes, alcances y límites. Arbor 187 (747):69-80.
    This paper consists of three sections. In the first one, some of the main developments in the philosophy of science through the xx century up to the present will be pointed out, and inserted them in the frame of some more general philosophical transformations, such as the so-called “linguistic turn” and “pragmatic turn”, respectively. In the second one, the established connection will be nuanced, from a revision of the work of a “classical” author such as Carnap. Finally, it will be (...)
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  36. added 2016-08-23
    Finnur Dellsén (forthcoming). Certainty and Explanation in Descartes' Philosophy of Science. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science.
    This paper presents a new approach to resolving an apparent tension in Descartes’ discussion of scientific theories and explanations in the Principles of Philosophy. On the one hand, Descartes repeatedly claims that any theories presented in science must be certain and indubitable. On the other hand, Descartes himself presents an astonishing number of speculative explanations of various scientific phenomena. In response to this tension, commentators have suggested that Descartes changed his mind about scientific theories having to be certain and indubitable, (...)
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  37. added 2016-08-23
    María G. Navarro (2016). A Principled Standpoint: A Reply to Sandra Harding. Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective 8:17-23.
    Take the strong rhetoric! This expression comes to mind as we set in order the ideas and impressions prompted by Sandra Harding’s “An Organic Logic of Research: A Response to Posey and Navarro”.
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  38. added 2016-08-21
    Seungbae Park (forthcoming). Problems with Using Evolutionary Theory in Philosophy. Axiomathes:1-12.
    Does science move toward truths? Are present scientific theories (approximately) true? Should we invoke truths to explain the success of science? Do our cognitive faculties track truths? Some philosophers say yes, while others say no, to these questions. Interestingly, both groups use the same scientific theory, viz., evolutionary theory, to defend their positions. I argue that it begs the question for the former group to do so because their positive answers imply that evolutionary theory is warranted, whereas it is self-defeating (...)
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  39. added 2016-08-19
    Asbjørn Steglich-Petersen (forthcoming). Epistemic Instrumentalism, Permissibility, and Reasons for Belief. In Conor McHugh, Jonathan Way & Daniel Whiting (eds.), Normativity: Epistemic and Practical. Oxford University Press
    Epistemic instrumentalists seek to understand the normativity of epistemic norms on the model practical instrumental norms governing the relation between aims and means. Non-instrumentalists often object that this commits instrumentalists to implausible epistemic assessments. I argue that this objection presupposes an implausibly strong interpretation of epistemic norms. Once we realize that epistemic norms should be understood in terms of permissibility rather than obligation, and that evidence only occasionally provide normative reasons for belief, an instrumentalist account becomes available that delivers the (...)
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  40. added 2016-08-17
    Theodore Bach (2016). Social Categories Are Natural Kinds, Not Objective Types (and Why It Matters Politically). Journal of Social Ontology 2 (2):177-201.
    There is growing support for the view that social categories like men and women refer to “objective types” (Haslanger 2000, 2006, 2012; Alcoff 2005). An objective type is a similarity class for which the axis of similarity is an objective rather than nominal or fictional property. Such types are independently real and causally relevant, yet their unity does not derive from an essential property. Given this tandem of features, it is not surprising why empirically-minded researchers interested in fighting oppression and (...)
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  41. added 2016-08-16
    Holly Andersen (forthcoming). What Would Hume Say? Regularities, Laws, and Mechanisms. In Phyllis Ilari & Stuart Glennan (eds.), What Would Hume Say? Regularities, Laws, and Mechanisms.
    This chapter examines the relationship between laws and mechanisms as approaches to characterising generalizations and explanations in science. I give an overview of recent historical discussions where laws failed to satisfy stringent logical criteria, opening the way for mechanisms to be investigated as a way to explain regularities in nature. This followed by a critical discussion of contemporary debates about the role of laws versus mechanisms in describing versus explaining regularities. I conclude by offering new arguments for two roles for (...)
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  42. added 2016-08-15
    Nicola Mößner, Bild in der Wissenschaft. GIB - Glossar der Bildphilosophie.
  43. added 2016-08-15
    Nicola Mößner (2012). Die Realität wissenschaftlicher Bilder. In Dimitri Liebsch & Nicola Mößner (eds.), Visualisierung und Erkenntnis. Bildverstehen und Bildverwenden in Natur- und Geisteswissenschaften. Von Halem 96-112.
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  44. added 2016-08-14
    Alison Wylie (2001). Archaeology and Philosophy of Science. In N. J. Smelser & Paul B. Baltes (eds.), International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Pergamon 614-617.
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  45. added 2016-08-12
    Nicola Mößner & Alfred Nordmann (forthcoming). Reasoning in Measurement. Routledge.
    This collection offers a new understanding of the epistemology of measurement. The interdisciplinary volume explores how measurements are produced, for example, in astronomy and seismology, in studies of human sexuality and ecology, in brain imaging and intelligence testing. It considers photography as a measurement technology and Henry David Thoreau's poetic measures as closing the gap between mind and world. -/- By focusing on measurements as the hard-won results of conceptual as well as technical operations the authors of the book no (...)
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  46. added 2016-08-11
    Adam Świeżyński (2015). Science and/or Miracle? The System Approach to Miracle Events. Open Theology 1 (1):389-406.
    The system approach to the miracle is based on the conviction that the complex issues, requiring the interdisciplinary approach, should be captured in a system way. Thus, the problem of miracle, because of its interdisciplinary character, should be captured in a systemic way, because such approach enables the more adequate and comprehensive presentation of these issues. The system approach towards the epistemology of miracle is the attempt of the more adequate presentation of the relationship between the scientific-natural research and theological (...)
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  47. added 2016-08-10
    Mark Couch (2012). Natural Kind. In Robert L. Fastiggi (ed.), New Catholic Encyclopedia Supplement 2012-13: Ethics and Philosophy. Gale
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  48. added 2016-08-09
    Michael R. Starks, The Logical Structure of Philosophy, Psychology, Mind and Language as Revealed in the Writings of Ludwig Wittgenstein and John Searle.
    I provide a critical survey of some of the major findings of Wittgenstein and Searle on the logical structure of intentionality (mind, language, behavior), taking as my starting point Wittgenstein’s fundamental discovery –that all truly ‘philosophical’ problems are the same—confusions about how to use language in a particular context, and so all solutions are the same—looking at how language can be used in the context at issue so that its truth conditions (Conditions of Satisfaction or COS) are clear. The basic (...)
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  49. added 2016-08-08
    Carlos Zednik & Frank Jäkel (forthcoming). Bayesian Reverse-Engineering Considered as a Research Strategy for Cognitive Science. Synthese:1-35.
    Bayesian reverse-engineering is a research strategy for developing three-level explanations of behavior and cognition. Starting from a computational-level analysis of behavior and cognition as optimal probabilistic inference, Bayesian reverse-engineers apply numerous tweaks and heuristics to formulate testable hypotheses at the algorithmic and implementational levels. In so doing, they exploit recent technological advances in Bayesian artificial intelligence, machine learning, and statistics, but also consider established principles from cognitive psychology and neuroscience. Although these tweaks and heuristics are highly pragmatic in character and (...)
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  50. added 2016-08-05
    Paul D. Thorn & Gerhard Schurz (2016). Attractivity Weighting: Take-the-Best's Foolproof Sibling. In A. Papafragou, D. Grodner, D. Mirman & J. C. Trueswell (eds.), Proceedings of the 38th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society 456-461.
    We describe a prediction method called "Attractivity Weighting" (AW). In the case of cue-based paired comparison tasks, AW's prediction is based on a weighted average of the cue values of the most successful cues. In many situations, AW's prediction is based on the cue value of the most successful cue, resulting in behavior similar to Take-the-Best (TTB). Unlike TTB, AW has a desirable characteristic called "access optimality": Its long-run success is guaranteed to be at least as great as the most (...)
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