Bookmark and Share

General Philosophy of Science

Edited by Howard Sankey (University of Melbourne)
Most recently added entries found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 129
  1. added 2015-05-25
    Robert B. Brandom (2015). From Empiricism to Expressivism. Harvard University Press.
  2. added 2015-05-25
    Anna Alexandrova (2015). Well‐Being and Philosophy of Science. Philosophy Compass 10 (3):219-231.
    This article is a mutual introduction of the science of well-being to philosophy of science and an explanation of how the two disciplines can benefit each other. In the process, I argue that the science of well-being is not helpfully viewed as a social or a natural, but rather as a mixed, science. Hence, its methodology will have to attend to its specific features. I discuss two of its methodological problems: justifying the role of values, and validating measures. I suggest (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. added 2015-05-22
    A. Teicher (forthcoming). Racial Zigzags: Visualizing Racial Deviancy in German Physical Anthropology During the 20th Century. History of the Human Sciences.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. added 2015-05-22
    N. Langlitz (forthcoming). On a Not so Chance Encounter of Neurophilosophy and Science Studies in a Sleep Laboratory. History of the Human Sciences.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. added 2015-05-19
    K. Brad Wray (2015). Kuhn’s Social Epistemology and the Sociology of Science. In William J. Devlin & Alisa Bokulich (eds.), Kuhn's Structure of Scientific Revolutions - 50 Years On. Springer. 167-183.
    I aim to clarify the relationship between Kuhn’s social epistemology of science and the sociology of science, and the nature of Kuhn’s positive legacy to the philosophy of science. I begin by recounting Kuhn’s relationship to the sociology of science. First, I examine the influence of sociology of science on Structure. Surprisingly, sociology of science had very little influence on Kuhn as he wrote Structure. Second, I examine early responses to Kuhn’s work by sociologists of science. Both the Mertonians and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. added 2015-05-17
    Hennie Lotter (1995). Postmodernism and Our Understanding of Science. In Deon Rossouw (ed.), Life in a postmodern culture. Human Sciences Research Council Press.
    Despite the flood of philosophical texts on postmodernism, relatively few attempts have been made to gauge the importance of postmodern ideas for the philosophy of science. However, Lyotard's enormously influential text The postmodern condition (1979) focussed on science and knowledge. He put the term metanarrative (grand narrative) into circulation. Lyotard defines the term modern to refer to the way in which science tries to legitimate its own status by means of philosophical discourse which appeal to some kind of grand narrative (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. added 2015-05-16
    Jeff Kochan (2015). Objective Styles in Northern Field Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 52:1-12.
    Social studies of science have often treated natural field sites as extensions of the laboratory. But this overlooks the unique specificities of field sites. While lab sites are usually private spaces with carefully controlled borders, field sites are more typically public spaces with fluid boundaries and diverse inhabitants. Field scientists must therefore often adapt their work to the demands and interests of local agents. I propose to address the difference between lab and field in sociological terms, as a difference in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. added 2015-05-15
    Moti Mizrahi (forthcoming). Historical Inductions, Unconceived Alternatives, and Unconceived Objections. Journal for General Philosophy of Science:1-10.
    In this paper, I outline a reductio against Stanford’s “New Induction” on the History of Science, which is an inductive argument against scientific realism that is based on what Stanford (2006) calls “the Problem of Unconceived Alternatives” (PUA). From the supposition that Stanford’s New Induction on the History of Science is cogent, and the parallel New Induction on the History of Philosophy (Mizrahi 2014), it follows that scientific antirealism is not worthy of belief. I also show that denying a key (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. added 2015-05-14
    Danny Frederick, A Regimented and Concise Exposition of Karl Popper’s Critical Rationalist Epistemology.
  10. added 2015-05-10
    Daniel C. Burnston, Benjamin Sheredos, Adele Abrahamsen & William Bechtel (forthcoming). Scientists' Use of Diagrams in Developing Mechanistic Explanations: A Case Study From Chronobiology. Pragmatics and Cognition.
  11. added 2015-05-09
    Charles Rathkopf (forthcoming). Network Representation and Complex Systems. Synthese:1-24.
    In this article, network science is discussed from a methodological perspective, and two central theses are defended. The first is that network science exploits the very properties that make a system complex. Rather than using idealization techniques to strip those properties away, as is standard practice in other areas of science, network science brings them to the fore, and uses them to furnish new forms of explanation. The second thesis is that network representations are particularly helpful in explaining the properties (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. added 2015-05-09
    Sergio A. Gallegos (2015). Are the Empirical and Materialist Stances Really Compatible? Southwest Philosophy Review 31 (1):129-137.
    In a recent paper, Ladyman (2011) has argued that the empirical stance, which has been championed by Van Fraassen (2002), and the materialist stance are compatible with each other –a thesis which is important for Ladyman since it paves the way for the project of developing a ‘radically naturalized metaphysics’ that he has defended along with Ross (2007). Though Ladyman puts forth a compelling case for the thesis that the two stances are compatible, I find his argument for the thesis (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. added 2015-05-08
    Gerhard Schurz & Paul D. Thorn (forthcoming). The Revenge of Ecological Rationality: Strategy Selection by Meta-Induction Within Changing Environments. Minds and Machines:1-29.
    ccording to the paradigm of adaptive rationality, successful inference and prediction methods tend to be local and frugal. As a complement to work within this paradigm, we investigate the problem of selecting an optimal combination of prediction methods from a given toolbox of such local methods, in the context of changing environments. These selection methods are called meta-inductive (MI) strategies, if they are based on the success-records of the toolbox-methods. No absolutely optimal MI strategy exists—a fact that we call the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. added 2015-05-08
    Paul D. Thorn (forthcoming). Wise Crowds, Clever Meta-Inductivists. In Uskali Mäki, Stéphanie Ruphy, Gerhard Schurz & Ioannis Votsis (eds.), Recent Developments in the Philosophy of Science: EPSA13 Helsinki. Springer.
    Formal and empirical work on the Wisdom of Crowds has extolled the virtue of diverse and independent judgment as essential to the maintenance of ‘wise crowds’. In other words, com-munication and imitation among members of a group may have the negative effect of decreasing the aggregate wisdom of the group. In contrast, it is demonstrable that certain meta-inductive methods provide optimal means for predicting unknown events. Such meta-inductive methods are essentially imitative, where the predictions of other agents are imitated to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. added 2015-05-07
    Uri D. Leibowitz & Neil Sinclair (eds.) (forthcoming). Explanation in Ethics and Mathematics. Oxford University Press.
    Contents: 1.'Introduction: Explanation in Ethics and Mathematics' Neil Sinclair & Uri D. Leibowitz. Part I: Evolutionary Debunking Arguments 2.'Genealogy and Reliability' Justin Clarke-Doane. 3.'Explaining the Reliability of Moral Beliefs' Folke Tersman. 4.'Genealogical Explanations of Chance and Morals' Toby Handfield. 5.'Evolutionary Debunking Arguments in Religion and Morality' Erik J. Wielenberg. 6.‘An Assumption of Extreme Significance’: Moore, Ross and Spencer on Ethics and Evolution' Hallvard Lillehammer. 7.'Reply: Confessions of a Modest Debunker' Richard Joyce. Part II: Indispensability Arguments. 8.'Moral Explanation for Moral Anti-Realism' (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. added 2015-05-07
    Daniel A. Wilkenfeld, Dillon Plunkett & Tania Lombrozo (forthcoming). Depth and Deference: When and Why We Attribute Understanding. Philosophical Studies:1-21.
    Four experiments investigate the folk concept of “understanding,” in particular when and why it is deployed differently from the concept of knowledge. We argue for the positions that people have higher demands with respect to explanatory depth when it comes to attributing understanding, and that this is true, in part, because understanding attributions play a functional role in identifying experts who should be heeded with respect to the general field in question. These claims are supported by our findings that people (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. added 2015-05-05
    Mitchell Herschbach & William Bechtel (2014). Mental Mechanisms and Psychological Construction. In Lisa Feldman Barrett & James Russell (eds.), The Psychological Construction of Emotion. Guilford Press. 21-44.
  18. added 2015-05-04
    Dustin Stokes (forthcoming). Imagination and Creativity. In Amy Kind (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of the Imagination. Routledge.
    This paper surveys historical and recent philosophical discussions of the relations between imagination and creativity. In the first two sections, it covers two insufficiently studied analyses of the creative imagination, that of Kant and Sartre, respectively. The next section discusses imagination and its role in scientific discovery, with particular emphasis on the writings of Michael Polanyi, and on thought experiments and experimental design. The final section offers a brief discussion of some very recent work done on conceptual relations between imagination (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. added 2015-04-30
    Robert Kowalenko, Thabo Mbeki, Postmodernism, and the Consequences [Manuscript].
    Explanations of former South African President Thabo Mbeki’s public and private views on the aetiology of the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the country remain partial at best without the recognition that the latter presuppose and imply a postmodernist/postcolonialist philosophy of science that erases the line separating the political from the scientific. Evidence from Mbeki’s public speeches, interviews, and private and anonymous writings suggests that it was postmodernist/postcolonialist theory that inspired him to doubt the “Western” scientific consensus on HIV/AIDS and to implement (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. added 2015-04-30
    Francisco Caruso (2012). 601 Books on Space. Maluhy & Co..
    Space is one of the most fundamental concepts over which scientific knowledge has been constructed. But it is also true that space concepts extrapolate by far the scientific domain, and permeate many other branches of human knowledge. Those are fascinating aspects that could di per se justify the compilation of a long bibliography. Another one is the passion for books. My interest in some physical, historical and philosophical problems concerning the concept of space in Physics, and its properties, can be (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. added 2015-04-29
    Joshua Rayman (2014). Crossing the Epistemological Divide: Foucault, Barthes, and Neo-Kantianism. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 4 (2):217-40.
    The schism between ‘ordinary’ and scientific perception and knowledge implies that we lack any total or systematic means of describing the world or identifying any framework-independent reality. Philosophers as diverse as Kant, Putnam, Strawson, Barthes, and Foucault have attempted to overcome this epistemological divide by constructing a unified, continuous theory of knowledge capable of accounting simultaneously for an allegedly primitive, unreflective, unmediated view of the world and an abstract, highly technical, scientific product. Rather than identifying analytic and continental epistemologies, adverting (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. added 2015-04-29
    Tiberiu Popa (2014). Scientific Method in Meteorology IV. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 4 (2):306-34.
    This article explores the main aspects of Aristotle’s scientific method in Meteorology IV. Dispositional properties such as solidifiability or combustibility play a dominant role in Meteor. IV (a) in virtue of their central place in the generic division of homoeomers, based on successive differentiation and multiple differentiae, and (b) in virtue of their role in revealing otherwise undetectable characteristics of uniform materials (composition and physical structure). While Aristotle often starts with accounts of ingredients and their ratio (e.g., solids that contain (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. added 2015-04-29
    James G. Lennox (2014). Aristotle on the Emergence of Material Complexity: Meteorology IV and Aristotle’s Biology. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 4 (2):272-305.
    In this article I defend an account of Meteorology IV as providing a material-level causal account of the emergence of uniform materials with a wide range of dispositional properties not found at the level of the four elements—the emergence of material complexity. I then demonstrate that this causal account is used in the Generation of Animals and Parts of Animals as part of the explanation of the generation of the uniform parts (tissues) and of their role in providing nonuniform parts (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. added 2015-04-28
    David Marshall Miller (2014). Representing Space in the Scientific Revolution. Cambridge University Press.
  25. added 2015-04-27
    Alan Richardson (2015). Nikolay Milkov and Volker Peckhaus, Eds. The Berlin Group and the Philosophy of Logical Empiricism. [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 5 (1):174-77.
    This is an important volume for rounding out our understanding of the origins and dimensions of the logical empiricist project. While the existence of a Berlin wing of logical empiricism—personified principally in Hans Reichenbach and Carl G. Hempel—has been well known, in the recent reappraisal literature the spotlight has been firmly on the Vienna Circle. [...] The essays give an expansive sense of the German-Berlin context of the work of not only Reichenbach and Hempel but also their philosophical colleagues Kurt (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. added 2015-04-27
    Karim Bschir (2015). Feyerabend and Popper on Theory Proliferation and Anomaly Import: On the Compatibility of Theoretical Pluralism and Critical Rationalism. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 5 (1):24-55.
    A fundamental tenet of Paul Feyerabend’s pluralistic view of science has it that theory proliferation, that is, the availability of theoretical alternatives, is of crucial importance for the detection of anomalies in established theories. Paul Hoyningen-Huene calls this the Anomaly Importation Thesis, according to which anomalies are imported, as it were, into well-established theories from competing alternatives. This article pursues two major objectives: (a) to work out the systematic details of Feyerabend’s ideas on theory proliferation and anomaly import as they (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. added 2015-04-27
    Marcin Miłkowski (2015). Evaluating Artificial Models of Cognition. Studies in Logic, Grammar and Rhetoric 40 (1):43-62.
    Artificial models of cognition serve different purposes, and their use determines the way they should be evaluated. There are also models that do not represent any particular biological agents, and there is controversy as to how they should be assessed. At the same time, modelers do evaluate such models as better or worse. There is also a widespread tendency to call for publicly available standards of replicability and benchmarking for such models. In this paper, I argue that proper evaluation ofmodels (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. added 2015-04-27
    Alisa Bokulich (2015). A. Douglas Stone. Einstein and the Quantum: The Quest of the Valiant Swabian. [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 5 (1):177-79.
    While everyone knows of Einstein’s brilliant work on relativity theory and many know of his later opposition to quantum theory as immortalized in his remark “He [God] does not play dice,” few outside of limited academic circles know of Einstein’s many seminal contributions to the development of quantum theory. In this highly accessible and enjoyable popular science book, Douglas Stone seeks to revise our popular conception of Einstein and bring the story of his profound and revolutionary insights into quantum theory (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. added 2015-04-27
    Cheryl Misak (2015). Klein on James on the Will to Believe. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 5 (1):118-28.
    This commentary explores the disagreement between Alex Klein and Cheryl Misak about the core insights of American Pragmatism, against a background of agreement. Both take the history of early American pragmatism to be a vital part of the history of analytic philosophy, not a radical break with it. But Misak argues that James seeks to loosen the usual epistemic standards so that religious and scientific belief can both be justified by a unitary set of evidentiary rules, and Klein argues that (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. added 2015-04-27
    M. Ashraf Adeel (2015). Evolution of Quine’s Thinking on the Thesis of Underdetermination and Scott Soames’s Accusation of Paradoxicality. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 5 (1):56-69.
    Scott Soames argues that interpreted in the light of Quine's holistic verificationism, Quine's thesis of underdetermination leads to a contradiction. It is contended here that if we pay proper attention to the evolution of Quine's thinking on the subject, particularly his criterion of theory individuation, Quine's thesis of underdetermination escapes Soames' charge of paradoxicality.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. added 2015-04-27
    Alexander Klein (2015). Science, Religion, and “The Will to Believe". Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 5 (1):72-117.
    Do the same epistemic standards govern scientific and religious belief? Or should science and religion operate in completely independent epistemic spheres? Commentators have recently been divided on William James’s answer to this question. One side depicts “The Will to Believe” as offering a separate-spheres defense of religious belief in the manner of Galileo. The other contends that “The Will to Believe” seeks to loosen the usual epistemic standards so that religious and scientific beliefs can both be justified by a unitary (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. added 2015-04-27
    Eric Palmer (2015). How to Succeed in Science While Really, Really Trying: The Central European Savant of the Mid-Eighteenth Century. [REVIEW] Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 5 (1):167-73.
    What is the scientist’s work? Philosophers may turn to theory and to its relation to observation; historians are more inclined to turn to the scientists themselves and the situation the scientists find themselves in. Why do scientists work as they do, and what effect does the world they inhabit have on their productivity and their product? Those are more the historians’ questions. They might appear to converge with the philosophers’ own in this: What does it take to be a successful (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. added 2015-04-26
    Boaz Miller (forthcoming). “Trust Me—I’M a Public Intellectual”: Margaret Atwood’s and David Suzuki’s Social Epistemologies of Climate Science. In Michael Keren & Richard Hawkins‎ (eds.), Speaking Power to Truth: Knowledge and the Public Intellectual in a Changing World‎. Athabasca University Press‎.
    Margaret Atwood and David Suzuki are two of the most prominent Canadian public ‎intellectuals ‎involved in the global warming debate. They both argue that anthropogenic global ‎warming is ‎occurring, warn against its grave consequences, and urge governments and the ‎public to take ‎immediate, decisive, extensive, and profound measures to prevent it. They differ, ‎however, in the ‎reasons and evidence they provide in support of their position. While Suzuki ‎stresses the scientific ‎evidence in favour of the global warming theory and the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. added 2015-04-23
    Milena Ivanova (forthcoming). Conventionalism, Structuralism and Neo-Kantianism in Poincaré׳s Philosophy of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics.
    Poincaré is well known for his conventionalism and structuralism. However, the relationship between these two theses and their place in Poincaré׳s epistemology of science remain puzzling. In this paper I show the scope of Poincaré׳s conventionalism and its position in Poincaré׳s hierarchical approach to scientific theories. I argue that for Poincaré scientific knowledge is relational and made possible by synthetic a priori, empirical and conventional elements, which, however, are not chosen arbitrarily. By examining his geometric conventionalism, his hierarchical account of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. added 2015-04-21
    Mark Andrews, A Proposed Proof of the Validity of Induction.
    The validity of induction may be shown by first assuming its invalidity, then by showing that this assumption reduces to absurdity. The assumption that inductive reasoning is invalid requires a conclusion that violates the law of identity, because the assumption leads to the conclusion that something is not what it is. Induction permits the rejection of predictions that are contrary to events in the past. The assumption that the future will resemble the past is unneeded. The only necessary premise is (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. added 2015-04-16
    Laura Felline (forthcoming). Mechanisms Meet Structural Explanation. Synthese.
    This paper investigates the relationship between Structural Explanation and the New Mechanistic account of explanation. The aim of this paper is twofold: firstly, to argue that some phenomena in the domain of fundamental physics, although mechanically brute, are structurally explained; and secondly, by elaborating on the contrast between SE and ME, to better clarify some features of SE. Finally, this paper will argue that, notwithstanding their apparently antithetical character, SE and ME can be reconciled within a unified account of general (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. added 2015-04-14
    Brad Berman (2015). Aristotle on Like-Partedness and the Like-Parted Bodies. Early Science and Medicine 20 (1):27-47.
    This paper offers an interpretation of Aristotle’s treatment of the homoeomerous, or like-parted, bodies. I argue that they are liable to be far more complexly structured than is commonly supposed. While Aristotelian homoeomers have no intrinsic macrostructural properties, they are, in an important class of cases, essentially marked by the presence and absence of microstructural ones. As I show, these microstructural properties allow Aristotle to neatly demarcate the non-elemental homoeomers from the elements. That demarcation, in turn, helps to clarify Aristotle’s (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. added 2015-04-13
    Dana Matthiessen (forthcoming). Mechanistic Explanation in Systems Biology: Cellular Networks. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science:axv011.
    It is argued that once biological systems reach a certain level of complexity, mechanistic explanations provide an inadequate account of many relevant phenomena. In this article, I evaluate such claims with respect to a representative programme in systems biological research: the study of regulatory networks within single-celled organisms. I argue that these networks are amenable to mechanistic philosophy without need to appeal to some alternate form of explanation. In particular, I claim that we can understand the mathematical modelling techniques of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. added 2015-04-11
    Marco Solinas (2015). From Aristotle’s Teleology to Darwin’s Genealogy: The Stamp of Inutility, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Starting with Aristotle and moving on to Darwin, Marco Solinas outlines the basic steps from the birth, establishment and later rebirth of the traditional view of living beings, and its overturning by evolutionary revolution. The classic framework devised by Aristotle was still dominant in the 17th Century world of Galileo, Harvey and Ray, and remained hegemonic until the time of Lamarck and Cuvier in the 19th Century. Darwin's breakthrough thus takes on the dimensions of an abandonment of the traditional finalistic (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. added 2015-04-09
    Marcin Miłkowski (forthcoming). Satisfaction Conditions in Anticipatory Mechanisms. Biology and Philosophy:1-20.
    The purpose of this paper is to present a general mechanistic framework for analyzing causal representational claims, and offer a way to distinguish genuinely representational explanations from those that invoke representations for honorific purposes. It is usually agreed that rats are capable of navigation because they maintain a cognitive map of their environment. Exactly how and why their neural states give rise to mental representations is a matter of an ongoing debate. I will show that anticipatory mechanisms involved in rats’ (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. added 2015-04-09
    Marcin Miłkowski (forthcoming). Explanatory Completeness and Idealization in Large Brain Simulations: A Mechanistic Perspective. Synthese:1-22.
    The claim defended in the paper is that the mechanistic account of explanation can easily embrace idealization in big-scale brain simulations, and that only causally relevant detail should be present in explanatory models. The claim is illustrated with two methodologically different models: Blue Brain, used for particular simulations of the cortical column in hybrid models, and Eliasmith’s SPAUN model that is both biologically realistic and able to explain eight different tasks. By drawing on the mechanistic theory of computational explanation, I (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. added 2015-04-07
    David Papineau (2015). There is No Trace of Any Soul Linked to the Body. In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. 369-376.
    This paper argues that all apparently special forces characteristically reduce to a few fundamental physical forces which conserve energy and operate throughout nature. Consequently, there are probably no special mental forces originating from souls and acting upon bodies and brains in addition to the basic, energy-conserving physical forces. Moreover, physiological and biochemical research have failed to uncover any evidence of forces over and above the basic physical forces acting on living bodies. It is as if all organic processes can be (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. added 2015-04-06
    Barbara Brandl (forthcoming). Abby Kinchy, Seeds, Science, and Struggle: The Global Politics of Transgenic Crops. Minerva:1-4.
    In her 2012 book Seeds, Science, and Struggle Abby Kinchy discusses the changing character of global conflicts concerning the adoption of new technologies, specifically genetically modified crops. She masterfully describes two cases in which the introduction of GM seeds leads to a broad public controversy. Her first case is the social movement against the usage of GM corn, which emerged in Mexico in the late 1990s. The second case Kinchy studies is the contamination of canola crops with GM varieties in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. added 2015-04-06
    Roberto Fumagalli (forthcoming). Why We Cannot Learn From Minimal Models. Erkenntnis.
    This paper examines the issue whether consideration of so-called minimal models can prompt learning about real-world targets. Using widely cited examples from economics and biology as test cases, I argue against the increasingly popular view that consideration of minimal models can prompt learning about such targets. In particular, I criticize the proponents of this view for failing to explicate in virtue of what properties or features minimal models supposedly prompt learning and for substantially overstating the epistemic import of minimal models. (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. added 2015-04-06
    Roman Frigg (2016). Models and Theories. Routledge.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. added 2015-04-06
    Saharon Shelah (2015). A.E.C. With Not Too Many Models. In Andrés Villaveces, Roman Kossak, Juha Kontinen & Åsa Hirvonen (eds.), Logic Without Borders: Essays on Set Theory, Model Theory, Philosophical Logic and Philosophy of Mathematics. De Gruyter. 367-402.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. added 2015-04-06
    Sara Bernstein (2015). The Metaphysics of Omissions. Philosophy Compass 10 (3):208-218.
    Omissions – any events, actions, or things that do not occur – are central to numerous debates in causation and ethics. This article surveys views on what omissions are, whether they are causally efficacious, and how they ground moral responsibility.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. added 2015-04-06
    David Weisman (2015). Dissolution Into Death: The Mind’s Last Symptoms Indicate Annihilation. In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. 83-104.
    This paper looks at progressive neurological diseases showing brain decline correlated with the decline of consciousness, as well as the content of consciousness. For instance, a young man’s healthy and fully functional brain generated an intelligent and lovely self, but then an aggressive brain tumor grew deep within his brain. As the tumor grew, it rendered brain tissue dysfunction and direct effects followed. From focal destruction of brain tissue, an aphasia first results. What follows is the dissolution of a functional (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. added 2015-04-06
    G. J. De Ridder, Science and Scientism in Popular Science Writing.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. added 2015-04-06
    Philippe Sormani (2015). Fun in Go: The Timely Delivery of a Monkey Jump and its Lingering Relevance to Science Studies. Human Studies 38 (2):281-308.
    This paper offers an ethnomethodological exploration of fun in Go , the timely delivery of a ‘Monkey Jump’ , and its lingering relevance to science studies . In Go terms, the paper makes a ‘pincer’ move: on the one hand, it explores the analytic potential of ‘fun’ for ethnographic purposes and, on the other hand, it questions its manifest abandonment in some quarters of science studies. In particular, the paper challenges their “curious seriousness” :69–78, 1990) whenever grand ontological claims are (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 129