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General Philosophy of Science

Assistant editor: Justin Bzovy (University of Western Ontario)
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  1. added 2015-01-28
    Darrell P. Rowbottom (forthcoming). Scientific Progress Without Increasing Verisimilitude: In Response to Niiniluoto. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A.
    First, I argue that scientific progress is possible in the absence of increasing verisimilitude in science’s theories. Second, I argue that increasing theoretical verisimilitude is not the central, or primary, dimension of scientific progress. Third, I defend my previous argument that unjustified changes in scientific belief may be progressive. Fourth, I illustrate how false beliefs can promote scientific progress in ways that cannot be explicated by appeal to verisimilitude.
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  2. added 2015-01-19
    Kristen Intemann (forthcoming). Distinguishing Between Legitimate and Illegitimate Values in Climate Modeling. European Journal for Philosophy of Science:1-16.
    While it is widely acknowledged that science is not “free” of non-epistemic values, there is disagreement about the roles that values can appropriately play. Several have argued that non-epistemic values can play important roles in modeling decisions, particularly in addressing uncertainties ; Risbey 2007; Biddle and Winsberg 2010; Winsberg : 111-137, 2012); van der Sluijs 359-389, 2012). On the other hand, such values can lead to bias ; Bray ; Oreskes and Conway 2010). Thus, it is important to identify when (...)
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  3. added 2015-01-19
    Paul Healy (1987). Facts, Values, and Objectivity in the Human Sciences. Auslegung 13 (2):139-151.
    In recent times the tenab.ility of a "value neutral" conception of social inquiry has come under increasing scrutiny. The critique of the traditional model is grounded in a reappraisal of the relationship of facts and values on the levels of both methodology and lived experience. The present essay reviews some major elements in the critique of value neutrality, and on the basis of a reappraisal of the fact/value relationship, argues for an alternative conception of the objectivity of the complex process (...)
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  4. added 2015-01-18
    Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther, Ryan Giordano, Michael D. Edge & Rasmus Nielsen (forthcoming). The Mind, the Lab, and the Field: Three Kinds of Populations in Scientific Practice. Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science, Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences.
    Scientists use models to understand the natural world, and it is important not to conflate model and nature. As an illustration, we distinguish three different kinds of populations in studies of ecology and evolution: theoretical, laboratory, and natural populations, exemplified by the work of R.A. Fisher, Thomas Park, and David Lack, respectively. Biologists are rightly concerned with all three types of populations. We examine the interplay between these different kinds of populations, and their pertinent models, in three examples: the notion (...)
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  5. added 2015-01-17
    Michael Morreau (forthcoming). Theory Choice and Social Choice: Kuhn Vindicated. Mind:fzu176.
    In a recent article, Okasha challenges Kuhn’s claim that there is no ‘neutral’ algorithm for theory choice. He argues using Arrow’s ‘impossibility’ theorem that — except under certain favourable conditions concerning the measurability and comparability of theoretical values — there are no theory choice algorithms at all, neutral or otherwise. But Okasha’s argument does not apply to important theory choice problems, among them the case of Copernican and Ptolemaic astronomy that much occupied Kuhn. The reason is that Kuhn’s choice criteria (...)
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  6. added 2015-01-17
    Philippe Gagnon (2014). "Le paradoxe du progrès : Cournot, Stent et Ruyer". In Michel Weber Vincent Berne (ed.), Chromatikon X : Annales de la philosophie en procès – Yearbook of Philosophy in Process. 71-90.
    This text reconsiders the philosophizing into the future of mankind and futurology done by molecular biologist Gunther Stent in *The Coming of the Golden Age* in the light of Raymond Ruyer's critical notice published in the aftermath of the publication of Stent's book in French translation. For Ruyer, it is an occasion to revisit his own take on what he called in his last work a "theology of the opposition between the organic and the rational," and to restate in a (...)
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  7. added 2015-01-15
    Molly Kao (forthcoming). Unificatory Power in the Old Quantum Theory: Informational Relevance of the Quantum Hypothesis. Philosophy of Science.
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  8. added 2015-01-13
    Brendan Hogan (2008). The Imaginative Character of Pragmatic Inquiry. Cognitio Estudos 5 (2).
    John Dewey’s lifelong labor to articulate an alternative account of logic from -/- the ‘abstract thought’ predominant in discussions of logic culminates in his 1938 Logic: the -/- theory of inquiry. In this text Dewey argues that all inquiry involves the instantiation of a general -/- pattern of inquiry. Articulating the role of imagination in the general pattern of inquiry is crucial -/- to illuminating the practical character and theoretical scope of this activity. Specifically, the -/- agency of the inquirer (...)
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  9. added 2015-01-07
    Marion Godman (forthcoming). The Special Science Dilemma and How Culture Solves It. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-18.
    I argue that there is a tension between the claim that at least some kinds in the special sciences are multiply realized and the claim that the reason kinds are prized by science is that they enter into a variety of different empirical generalizations. Nevertheless, I show that this tension ceases in the case of ‘cultural homologues’–such as specific ideologies, religions, and folk wisdom. I argue that the instances of such special science kinds do have several projectable properties in common (...)
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  10. added 2015-01-07
    Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (2014). From Corpuscles to Elements: Chemical Ontologies From Van Helmon to Lavoisier. In Lee McIntyre & Eric Scerri (eds.), Philosophy of Chemistry: Growth of a New Discipline. Springer. 141-154.
  11. added 2015-01-06
    Eugen Fischer (2015). Mind the Metaphor! A Systematic Fallacy in Analogical Reasoning. Analysis 75 (1):67-77.
    Conceptual metaphors facilitate both productive and pernicious analogical reasoning. This article addresses the question: When and why does the frequently helpful use of metaphor become pernicious? By applying the most influential theoretical framework from cognitive psychology in analysing the philosophically most prominent example of pernicious metaphorical reasoning , we identify a philosophically relevant but previously undescribed fallacy in analogical reasoning with metaphors. We then outline an explanation of why even competent thinkers commit this fallacy and obtain a psychologically informed ‘debunking’ (...)
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  12. added 2015-01-06
    Eugen Fischer (2014). Messing Up the Mind? Analogical Reasoning with Metaphors. In Henrique Jales Ribeiro (ed.), Systematic Approaches to Argument by Analogy. Springer. 129-148.
    One major facilitator of analogical reasoning is conceptual metaphor: cross-domain mappings that preserve relations and thereby motivate the extension of linguistic terms from the source to the target domain. Their conscious and explicit use in analogical reasoning has been helpful and productive in disciplines ranging from physics to psychology, and philosophy. At the same time, students of metaphor have suggested that partially unwitting use of conceptual metaphors led to unsound but intuitive conceptions of the mind, in philosophy and psychology. This (...)
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  13. added 2015-01-06
    Stephen Acreman (2014). Show Us Your Traces: Traceability as a Measure for the Political Acceptability of Truth-Claims. Contemporary Political Theory 1 (1):01-01.
    This article considers some political potentialities of the post-constructivist proposal for substituting truth with traceability. Traceability is a measure of truthfulness in which the rationality of a truth-claim is found in accounting for the work done to maintain links back to an internal referent through a chain of mediations. The substitution of traceability for truth is seen as necessary to move the entire political domain towards a greater responsiveness to the events of the natural-social world. In particular, it seeks to (...)
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  14. added 2015-01-06
    Robert S. Gall (2014). Knowing, Counting, Being: Meillassoux, Heidegger and the Possibility of Science. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 28:335-345.
    In his book After Finitude, Quentin Meillassoux criticizes post-Kantian philosophy for its inability to explain how science is able to describe a world without human beings. This paper addresses that challenge through a consideration of Heidegger’s thought and his thinking about science. It is argued that the disagreement between Meillassoux and Heidegger comes down to a question of first philosophy and the priority of logic or ontology in philosophy. Ultimately, Heidegger’s emphasis on ontology in philosophy is superior in its ability (...)
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  15. added 2015-01-02
    Howard Sankey (forthcoming). Constructively Engaging with Relativism. Metascience:1-5.
    Traditional epistemology is haunted by the spectre of scepticism. Yet the more pressing concern in the contemporary intellectual scene must surely be relativism rather than scepticism. This has been the case in the history and philosophy of science since the work of Thomas Kuhn and Paul Feyerabend, to say nothing of the emergence of the sociology of scientific knowledge.In Epistemic Relativism: A Constructive Critique, Markus Seidel comes firmly to grips with this modern spectre. Though Seidel devotes attention to other forms (...)
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  16. added 2014-12-31
    William C. N. Dunlop (2014). The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 11 (4):557-561.
    In The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values , Sam Harris presents a case for basing moral principles on scientific investigation. He highlights some of the limits of traditional religious dogmas. Likewise, he critiques the excessive moral indecisiveness and ineptitude of some who hold a more liberal doctrine, calling this “moral relativism.” Harris also puts forward a thought-provoking argument as to how science can be used to create a superior moral framework. However, there are shortcomings with Harris’ argument, (...)
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  17. added 2014-12-30
    Yann Benétreau-Dupin (forthcoming). The Bayesian Who Knew Too Much. Synthese:1-16.
    In several papers, John Norton has argued that Bayesianism cannot handle ignorance adequately due to its inability to distinguish between neutral and disconfirming evidence. He argued that this inability sows confusion in, e.g., anthropic reasoning in cosmology or the Doomsday argument, by allowing one to draw unwarranted conclusions from a lack of knowledge. Norton has suggested criteria for a candidate for representation of neutral support. Imprecise credences (families of credal probability functions) constitute a Bayesian-friendly framework that allows us to avoid (...)
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  18. added 2014-12-28
    Iulian D. Toader (forthcoming). Against Harmony: Infinite Idealizations and Causal Explanation. In Boston Studies in the Philosophy and History of Science. Springer.
    This paper discusses the idea that some of the causal factors that are responsible for the production of a natural phenomenon are explanatorily irrelevant. It argues against Craig Callender's suggestion that the standard explanation of phase transitions may be considered a causal explanation, in Michael Strevens' sense, as a distortion that can nevertheless successfully represent causal relations.
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  19. added 2014-12-24
    Carole J. Lee (forthcoming). Commensuration Bias in Peer Review. Philosophy of Science.
    To arrive at their final evaluation of a manuscript or grant proposal, reviewers must convert a submission’s strengths and weaknesses for heterogeneous peer review criteria into a single metric of quality or merit. I identify this process of commensuration as the locus for a new kind of peer review bias. Commensuration bias illuminates how the systematic prioritization of some peer review criteria over others permits and facilitates problematic patterns of publication and funding in science. Commensuration bias also foregrounds a range (...)
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  20. added 2014-12-24
    Carole J. Lee (forthcoming). Revisiting Current Causes of Women's Underrepresentation in Science. In Jennifer Saul Michael Brownstein (ed.), Implicit Bias and Philosophy Volume 1: Metaphysics and Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
  21. added 2014-12-23
    Jonathan Y. Tsou (forthcoming). Reconsidering the Carnap-Kuhn Connection. In William J. Devlin & Alisa Bokulich (eds.), Kuhn's Structure of Scientific Revolutions - 50 Years On. Boston Studies in the Philosophy and History of Science, vol. 11. Springer.
    Recently, some philosophers of science (e.g., Gürol Irzik, Michael Friedman) have challenged the ‘received view’ on the relationship between Rudolf Carnap and Thomas Kuhn, suggesting that there is a close affinity (rather than opposition) between their philosophical views. In support of this argument, these authors cite Carnap and Kuhn’s similar views on incommensurability, theory-choice, and scientific revolutions. Against this revisionist view, I argue that the philosophical relationship between Carnap and Kuhn should be regarded as opposed rather than complementary. In particular, (...)
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  22. added 2014-12-21
    Veikko Rantala (2002). Explanatory Translation. Beyond the Kuhnian Model of Conceptual Change. Kluwer/Springer.
    A systematic attempt to understand cognitive characteristics of translation by bringing its logical, pragmatic, and hermeneutic features together and examining a number of scientific, logical (philosophical and formal),and philosophical applications. The notion of translation investigated here is called explanatory since it is not a translation in the standard, meaning-saving sense but aims to provide an explanation for the meaning change in exact terms.
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  23. added 2014-12-17
    Peter R. Anstey & Alberto Vanzo (forthcoming). Early Modern Experimental Philosophy. In Justin Sytsma & Wesley Buckwalter (eds.), A Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Blackwell.
    In the mid-seventeenth century a movement of self-styled experimental philosophers emerged in Britain. Originating in the discipline of natural philosophy amongst Fellows of the fledgling Royal Society of London, it soon spread to medicine and by the eighteenth century had impacted moral and political philosophy and even aesthetics. Early modern experimental philosophers gave epistemic priority to observation and experiment over theorising and speculation. They decried the use of hypotheses and system-building without recourse to experiment and, in some quarters, developed a (...)
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  24. added 2014-12-16
    Mark Alfano (forthcoming). Ramsifying Virtue Theory. In , Current Controversies in Virtue Theory. Routledge. 123-35.
    In his contribution, Mark Alfano lays out a new (to virtue theory) naturalistic way of determining what the virtues are, what it would take for them to be realized, and what it would take for them to be at least possible. This method is derived in large part from David Lewis’s development of Frank Ramsey’s method of implicit definition. The basic idea is to define a set of terms not individually but in tandem. This is accomplished by assembling all and (...)
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  25. added 2014-12-15
    Yuko Murakami & Manabu Sumida (2014). History and Philosophy of Science in Japanese Education: A Historical Overview. In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. 2217-2245.
    This article describes the historical development of HPS/NOS mainly in higher education. Because the establishment of universities in Japan in late-nineteenth century was a reaction against Western imperialism, higher education aimed to cultivate scientists and engineers with an emphasis on practical applications. This direction in higher science and engineering education continues into the present. It has conditioned elementary and secondary education via university entrance examinations, where no questions on NOS appear. Hence, HPS research and education has developed in Japanese higher (...)
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  26. added 2014-12-14
    Mansoor Niaz (2014). Science Textbooks: The Role of History and Philosophy of Science. In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. 1411-1441.
    Research in science education has recognized the importance of history and philosophy of science (HPS), and this has facilitated the evaluation of science textbooks. Purpose of this chapter is to review research based on analyses of science textbooks that explicitly use a history and philosophy of science framework. This review has focused on studies published in the 15-year period (1996–2010) and has drawn on the following major science education journals: International Journal of Science Education, Journal of Research in Science Teaching, (...)
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  27. added 2014-12-14
    Brian Dunst & Alex Levine (2014). Conceptual Change: Analogies Great and Small and the Quest for Coherence. In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. 1345-1361.
    Historians and philosophers of science have, in recent decades, offered evidence in support of several influential models of conceptual change in science. These models have often drawn on and in turn driven research on conceptual change in childhood and in science education. This nexus of reciprocal influences is held together by several largely unexamined analogies and by several assumptions concerning analogy itself. In this chapter, we aim to shed some light on these hidden premises and subject them to critical scrutiny. (...)
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  28. added 2014-12-12
    Nicholas Maxwell (forthcoming). Can Scientific Method Help Us Create a Wiser World? In N. Dalal, A. Intezari & M. Heitz (eds.), Practical Wisdom in the Age of Technology: Insights, Issues and Questions for a New Millennium. Ashgate.
    Two great problems of learning confront humanity: (1) learning about the universe, and about ourselves as a part of the universe, and (2) learning how to make progress towards as good a world as possible. We solved the first problem when we created modern science in the 17th century, but we have not yet solved the second problem. This puts us in a situation of unprecedented danger. Modern science and technology enormously increase our power to act, but not our power (...)
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  29. added 2014-12-12
    N. Karakayali (forthcoming). Adapting, Defending and Transforming Ourselves: Conceptualizations of Self Practices in the Social Science Literature. History of the Human Sciences.
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  30. added 2014-12-12
    E. Lafuente, J. C. Loredo & J. Castro (forthcoming). Citizens at Work: Evolutionism, Functionalism, Progressivism and Industrial Psychology in the Writings of Arland D. Weeks. History of the Human Sciences.
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  31. added 2014-12-12
    Axel Gelfert (2014). Applicability, Indispensability, and Underdetermination: Puzzling Over Wigner's 'Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics'. Science and Education 23 (5):997-1009.
    In his influential 1960 paper ‘The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences’, Eugene P. Wigner raises the question of why something that was developed without concern for empirical facts—mathematics—should turn out to be so powerful in explaining facts about the natural world. Recent philosophy of science has developed ‘Wigner’s puzzle’ in two different directions: First, in relation to the supposed indispensability of mathematical facts to particular scientific explanations and, secondly, in connection with the idea that aesthetic criteria track (...)
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  32. added 2014-12-11
    Cynthia Passmore, Julia Svoboda Gouvea & Ronald Giere (2014). Models in Science and in Learning Science: Focusing Scientific Practice on Sense-Making. In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. 1171-1202.
    The central aim of science is to make sense of the world. To move forward as a community endeavor, sense-making must be systematic and focused. The question then is how do scientists actually experience the sense-making process? In this chapter we examine the “practice turn” in science studies and in particular how as a result of this turn scholars have come to realize that models are the “functional unit” of scientific thought and form the center of the reasoning/sense-making process. This (...)
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  33. added 2014-12-11
    Gürol Irzik & Robert Nola (2014). New Directions for Nature of Science Research. In Michael R. Matthews (ed.), International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. 999-1021.
    The idea of family resemblance, when applied to science, can provide a powerful account of the nature of science (NOS). In this chapter we develop such an account by taking into consideration the consensus on NOS that emerged in the science education literature in the last decade or so. According to the family resemblance approach, the nature of science can be systematically and comprehensively characterised in terms of a number of science categories which exhibit strong similarities and overlaps amongst diverse (...)
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  34. added 2014-12-11
    Peter Lipton (2009). Understanding Without Explanation. In H. W. de Regt, S. Leonelli & K. Eigner (eds.), Scientific Understanding: Philosophical Perspectives. University of Pittsburgh Press. 43-63.
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  35. added 2014-12-07
    Michael R. Matthews (2014). Introduction: The History, Purpose and Content of the Springer International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. In , International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. 1-15.
    This is the first handbook to be published that is devoted to the field of historical and philosophical research in science and mathematics education (HPS&ST). Given that science and mathematics through their long history have always been engaged with philosophy and that for over a century it has been recognised that science and mathematics curriculum development, teaching, assessment and learning give rise to so many historical and philosophical questions, it is unfortunate that such a handbook has been so long coming.
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  36. added 2014-12-07
    Michael R. Matthews (2014). Pendulum Motion: A Case Study in How History and Philosophy Can Contribute to Science Education. In , International Handbook of Research in History, Philosophy and Science Teaching. Springer. 19-56.
    The pendulum has had immense scientific, cultural, social and philosophical impact. Historical, methodological and philosophical studies of pendulum motion can assist teachers to improve science education by developing enriched curricular material, and by showing connections between pendulum studies and other parts of the school programme, especially mathematics, social studies, technology and music. The pendulum is a universal topic in high-school science programmes and some elementary science courses; an enriched approach to its study can result in deepened science literacy across the (...)
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  37. added 2014-12-04
    Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.) (forthcoming). The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case Against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield.
    Because every single one of us will die, most of us would like to know what—if anything—awaits us afterward, not to mention the fate of lost loved ones. Given the nearly universal vested interest we personally have in deciding this question in favor of an afterlife, it is no surprise that the vast majority of books on the topic affirm the reality of life after death without a backward glance. But the evidence of our senses and the ever-gaining strength of (...)
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  38. added 2014-12-02
    Peter Garik, Luciana Garbayo, Yann Benétreau-Dupin, Charles Winrich, Andrew Duffy, Nicholas Gross & Manher Jariwala (forthcoming). Teaching the Conceptual History of Physics to Physics Teachers. Science and Education.
    For nearly a decade we have taught the history and philosophy of science as part of courses aimed at the professional development of physics teachers. The focus of the history of science instruction is on the stages in the development of the concepts and theories of physics. For this instruction, we designed activities to help the teachers organize their understanding of this historical development. The activities include scientific modeling using archaic theories. We conducted surveys to gauge the impact on the (...)
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  39. added 2014-12-01
    C. Mantzavinos (2006). Comment on Nancy Cartwright's 'Against the System'. In Christoph Engel Lorraine Daston (ed.), Is There Value in Inconsistency? 57-62.
  40. added 2014-11-28
    Bertold Schweitzer (forthcoming). Modelling Mechanisms of Democratic Transition in the Arab Uprisings. Middle East Critique 24 (1).
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  41. added 2014-11-28
    Bertold Schweitzer (forthcoming). From Malfunction to Mechanism. Philosophia Scientiæ 19 (1).
    Malfunctions, deficits, and errors provide considerable insight into key features of the entities in which they occur. In particular, the careful analysis of patterns of functioning and malfunctioning facilitate discovery, explanation and theorizing about structure, function, and underlying mechanisms of a system. In some cases, malfunctions even supply the unique probe into the internal workings of a system. This essay analyzes methods used by various disciplines involving malfunctions such as mutations, visual illusions, action slips, or speech errors, and identities common (...)
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  42. added 2014-11-28
    Bertold Schweitzer (2013). ‘Vom Fehler im Gegenstand zur Theorie über den Gegenstand’: Wissenschaftstheorie und interdisziplinäres Arbeiten. In Michael Jungert, Elsa Romfeld, Thomas Sukopp & Uwe Voigt (eds.), Interdisziplinarität: Theorie, Praxis, Probleme. Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft. 109-126.
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  43. added 2014-11-28
    Bertold Schweitzer & Klaus Gilgenmann (2005). Strukturelle Analogien bei biotischer und soziokultureller Evolution. Erwägen Wissen Ethik 16 (3):421–424.
    The article by B. Stephan (this issue) describes characteristics and stages of change of sociobiological and socio-cultural units. However, neither analogy nor evolutionary and developmental concept are sufficiently precise. In addition, Stephan pays no attention to structural analogies between biotic and cultural change, and therefore comes to the misguided assessment that socio-cultural change is to be construed as a developmental rather than an evolutionary process.
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  44. added 2014-11-28
    Bertold Schweitzer (2003). Heuristik von einem rationalen Standpunkt. In Wolfgang Buschlinger & Christoph Lütge (eds.), Kaltblütig: Philosophie von einem rationalen Standpunkt. Hirzel. 107-126.
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  45. added 2014-11-26
    Maureen O'Malley, Ingo Brigandt, Alan C. Love, John W. Crawford, Jack A. Gilbert, Rob Knight, Sandra D. Mitchell & Forest Rohwer (2014). Multilevel Research Strategies and Biological Systems. Philosophy of Science 81:811-828.
    Multilevel research strategies characterize contemporary molecular inquiry into biological systems. We outline conceptual, methodological, and explanatory dimensions of these multilevel strategies in microbial ecology, systems biology, protein research, and developmental biology. This review of emerging lines of inquiry in these fields suggests that multilevel research in molecular life sciences has significant implications for philosophical understandings of explanation, modeling, and representation.
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  46. added 2014-11-23
    Barbara Herrnstein Smith (2009). Review of Steven Shapin, The Scientific Life. [REVIEW] London Review of Books 31 (3):10-12.
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  47. added 2014-11-20
    C. Mantzavinos (forthcoming). Scientific Explanation. In International Encyclopedia of Social and Behavioral Sciences. Elsevier.
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  48. added 2014-11-20
    C. Mantzavinos (2013). Explanatory Games. Journal of Philosophy (November 2013):606-632.
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  49. added 2014-11-19
    Hyundeuk Cheon (2014). Meta-Incommensurability Revisited. Theoria. An International Journal for Theory, History and Foundations of Science 80 (2):243-259.
    A popular rejoinder to the potential threat that incommensurability might pose to scientific realism has been the referential response: despite meaning variance, there can be referential continuity, which is sufficient for rational theory choice. This response has been charged with meta-incommensurability, according to which it begs the question by assuming a realist metaphysics. However, realists take it to be a rhetorical device that hinders productive discussion. By reconstructing the debate, this paper aims to demonstrate two things. First, there are unexpected (...)
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  50. added 2014-11-17
    Sheldon Richmond (2014). Book Review: Why Things Matter to People: Science, Values and Ethical Life. [REVIEW] Philosophy of the Social Sciences 44 (6):837-839.
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