About this topic
Summary Genetic ethics is the study of the moral and political implications of (A) discoveries in the field of genetics (B) advances in genetic technology. For example, a study of the ethical, legal and social issues (ELSI) of (A) and (B) was funded as part of the Human Genome Project, started in 1986 and concluded in 2003, whose main goal was to identify all the genes in the human DNA and determine the sequence of all DNA chemical bases of a human being. Genes are units of biological hereditary information, which can be coded by different molecules (sharing similar characteristics), the most stable of which is the DNA. Since the information stored in genes influences the development of a whole organism, it is often regarded as having special importance, thus raising issues of privacy protection or discrimination. It is also apt to be used in controversial ways, e.g. deciding whether a future human person ought to exist or not (such as in selective preimplantation genetic diagnosis or abortion).  
Key works Harris 1992 argues that it is mandatory to use advances in gene therapy to remove vulnerability to infections and pollutants or to radiation damage. It advances an argument that, beside removing the genetic causes of what we regard today as "disability", it is equally mandatory to retard the ageing process, remove predispositions to heart disease, destroy carcinogens and permit human beings to tolerate other environmental pollutants.  Buchanan et al 2000 focuses on justice in the access to human genetic technology, but considers a broad range of themes and arguments: the moral heredity of eugenics, the distinction between therapy and enhancement, constrains and permissions on parental choices of genetic selection, and the disability critique of liberal eugenics. It maintains a position that is liberal, in that it permits individuals a wide range of choices concerning the genetic endowments of their future children, yet constrains it by blocking interventions which would harm the future person (by reducing future options) or society (by causing an unfair distribution of social goods). Fukuyama 2002 regards genetic technology the practice that will radically change human nature with irreversible moral implications. Genetic technology is thus objectionable, in that undermines the natural presuppositions of egalitarian liberalism. Habermas 2003 defends a principled distinction between gene-therapy to cure disease and genetic manipulation allowing parents to select the traits of future children. The latter is seen as incompatible with egalitarian relationships between human beings and their freedom of choice. 
Introductions Buchanan et al manuscript; Brock 2003.
  Show all references
Related categories
Subcategories:
1445 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 1445
Material to categorize
  1. Joseph Peterson (1915). Oore's The Genetic Aspects of Consonance and Dissonance. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 12 (25):694.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Terri Lynn Peterson (2000). What is Human: Considerations of a Genetic Definition of Human Beings. Dissertation, University of Minnesota
    The dissertation questions what is it to be human and what are the consequences of genetic research on possible responses to this question. The thesis of this work is that an understanding of the human which integrates the genetic or biological with the conscious or existential---what is termed "bio-existentialism"---is required in response to innovations in biotechnology. The Human Genome Project , serves as the focal point to this work, with genetic engineering discussed in the final chapter. ;The work begins with (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Vassilis Ragoussis, Ida Ngueng Feze & Yann Joly (2014). Sharing Genetic Information Online: An Exploration of GINA's 2.0 Frontier. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (11):53-55.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Michael Reiss (1999). What Sort of People Do We Want? The Ethics of Changing People Through Genetic Engineering. Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy 13 (1):63-92.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. F. W. Robertson (1982). Genetics: Human Aspects. Journal of Biosocial Science 14 (2):249.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Robert Paul Rosenfeld (1989). Genetic Engineering, Human Moral Status, and Moral Subservience. Dissertation, Boston University
    Certain uses of genetic engineering may present problems for, or threats to "humanity." Specific problems treated are ones for "humanity" as a form of moral status. These involve the moral significance of the distinction between humans and nonhumans, and the justifications for moral equality among human beings. To the extent that these depend upon the genetic endowment of humans , genetic changes can change moral status relationships. They can change what counts as a human being, as well as change what (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Barbara Katz Rothman (1998). Genetic Maps and Human Imaginations the Limits of Science in Understanding Who We Are.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Troy D. Sadler & Dana L. Zeidler (2005). The Significance of Content Knowledge for Informal Reasoning Regarding Socioscientific Issues: Applying Genetics Knowledge to Genetic Engineering Issues. Science Education 89 (1):71-93.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Troy D. Sadler & Dana L. Zeidler (2004). The Morality of Socioscientific Issues: Construal and Resolution of Genetic Engineering Dilemmas. Science Education 88 (1):4-27.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Julian Savulescu, Melanie Hemsley, Ainsley Newson & Bennett Foddy (2006). Behavioural Genetics: Why Eugenic Selection is Preferable to Enhancement. Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (2):157-171.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Eric B. Schmidt (2004). Expanding the Child's Range of Open Futures: A Proposed Basis for the Ethical Assessment of Parental Genetic Trait Selections. Dissertation, University of Washington
    This dissertation considers the bases upon which ethical assessments of parental genetic trait selections for their children can be made. It argues that if parents engage in genetic trait selections, they must act to expand their child's range of open futures, not to constrict their child's range of open futures or to differentially shift their child's range of open futures. It contends that other proposed distinctions, including distinctions between normal and diseased states and between treatment selections and enhancement selections, do (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Margaret M. Schneider (2003). In Praise of the Cosmic Egg: Exploring the Ecopsychology of the Genetic Revolution. Dissertation, Union Institute and University
    This PDE is about ecopsychology in relation to technological consciousness. The author learned that a global genetic revolution is happening in the absence of public understanding, democratic discourse, and adequate guiding policies. Schneider sought ways to increase lay peoples' understanding and support of the ecopsychological principles and values expressed in the Genetic Bill of Rights, as written by the Council for Responsible Genetics. She presents a series of paintings and stories she created to help people think in imaginative ways about (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Richard Roy Sharp (1999). Research on Genetic Hypersensitivities to Environmental Exposures: Moral and Social Issues. Dissertation, Michigan State University
    Current projections suggest that the Human Genome Project will complete the first human genetic reference sequence by the year 2003. The completion of the HGP reference sequence represents a crowning achievement in molecular genetics and marks the beginning of a new era in the study of human disease. The complete HGP reference sequence will allow researchers to explore the effects of genetic variation on the development of complex diseases, such as asthma, cancer, diabetes, and coronary heart disease. ;The expected availability (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Susumu Shimazono (2010). Reasons Against the Selection of Life: From Japan's Experience of Prenatal Genetic Diagnosis. In Julian Savulescu & Nick Bostrom (eds.), Human Enhancement. OUP Oxford
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Eliot Slater (1936). Human Genetics and its Social Import. The Eugenics Review 28 (3):225.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. George Patrick Smith (1993). Bioethics and the Law Medical, Socio-Legal and Philosophical Directions for a Brave New World. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  17. George Patrick Smith (1982). Ethical, Legal and Social Challenges to a Brave New World. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. United States (1982). Screening and Counseling for Genetic Conditions a Report on the Ethical, Social, and Legal Implications of Genetic Screening, Counseling, and Educational Programs. President's Commission for the Study of Ethical Problems in Medicine and Biomedical and Behavioral Research.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. United States (1982). Splicing Life a Report on the Social and Ethical Issues of Genetic Engineering with Human Beings. President's Commission for the Study of Ethical Problems in Medicine and Biomedical and Behavioral Research.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Terence Sullivan (2001). The Limits and Lies of Human Genetic Research: Dangers for Social Policy. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 110.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Kaoru Suzumori (forthcoming). F25. The Present State of and Issues Concerning Preimplantation Diagnosis. Bioethics in Asia: The Proceedings of the Unesco Asian Bioethics Conference (Abc'97) and the Who-Assisted Satellite Symposium on Medical Genetics Services, 3-8 Nov, 1997 in Kobe/Fukui, Japan, 3rd Murs Japan International Symposium, 2nd Congress of the Asi.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Phd Thomas Murray & Phd Erik Parens (2002). Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis: Beginning a Long Conversation. Lahey Clinic Medical Ethics Journal 9 (2):1-8.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. P. S. Timiras (2001). Genetic Imaginations: Ethical, Legal and Social Issues in Human Genome Research. Edited by Peter Glasner and Harry Rothman. The European Legacy 6 (1):122-122.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Charalambos Tsekeris & George Alexias (2012). Science, Genetic Knowledge and the Human Body. Problemos 81:67-78.
    This paper aims to overview the dynamical character of science and scientific knowledge within the changing biotechnological era, as well as the emergent discourse of geneticization and its relevance to genetic counseling and the human body. Its main purpose is to carefully explore and comprehensively critique the contemporary theoretical literature on these distinct but interdependent issues from an interdisciplinary standpoint. The paper encourages further critical contributions to thinking about what it means to be human, as well as about how to (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. D. Turnball (2002). Reflections on Genetic Manipulation and Duties to Posterity: An Engagement with Skene and Coady. Monash Bioethics Review 21 (4):10-31.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Richard Twine (2009). Leonardo’s Choice – Genetic Technologies and Animals, by Carol Gigliotti. Genomics, Society and Policy 5:87-90.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Patricia Ullman (1986). The Scientific, Ethical and Political Aspects of Human Genetic Engineering. Dissertation, Purdue University
    This work addresses some of the major scientific, ethical and socio/political aspects and implications of the molecular biologists' newly acquired ability to manipulate, indeed, literally, to splice together, the material which is responsible for the different forms of life on earth. It attempts to clarify the fundamental scientific and humanitarian questions of the technology of genetic engineering, especially as it might be directly applied to human beings. In so doing, it first seeks to present the status of the technology of (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Law Reform Commission of Victoria (1989). Genetic Manipulation.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Helen Watt (1999). Germ-Line Therapy for Mitochondrial Disease: Some Ethical Objections. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 8 (1):88.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. L. Westra (1991). Perinatal Medicine and Genetic Engineering: Some Ethical Considerations. Global Bioethics 4 (13):39-48.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Margaret L. While, Jon R. Hendrix & Thomas R. Mertens (1987). Biosocial Goals and Human Genetics: An Impact Study of NSF Workshops. Science Education 71 (2):137-144.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. H. O. Wildenskov (1935). Eugenic Legislation in Denmark. The Eugenics Review 26 (4):281.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. F. J. Wittelshoefer (1942). German Eugenic Legislation in Peace and War. The Eugenics Review 34 (3):91.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Susan M. Wolf, Jeffrey P. Kahn & John E. Wagner (2003). Clinical, Ethical, and Legal Issues in Using Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis to Create a Stem Cell Donor. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 31:327-39.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. David Wyatt (2010). Genetic Policing: The Use of DNA in Criminal Investigations, by Robin Williams & Paul Johnson, and Genetic Suspects: Global Governance of Forensic DNA Profiling and Databasing, Edited by Richard Hindmarsh & Barbara Prainsack. Genomics, Society and Policy 6:75-79.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Xu Zongliang (2003). Ethical Challenges Of Human Genome Diversity Research. Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 13 (1):8-10.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
Eugenics
  1. Mark B. Adams (2009). Eugenics. In Vardit Ravitsky, Autumn Fiester & Arthur L. Caplan (eds.), The Penn Center Guide to Bioethics. Springer Publishing Company 371.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Eli Y. Adashi & I. Glenn Cohen (2015). Editing the Genome of the Human Germline: May Cool Heads Prevail. American Journal of Bioethics 15 (12):40-42.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Mourant Ae (1964). The Eugenics Society and Social Research. The Eugenics Review 55 (4):207-209.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Nicholas Agar (2013). Eugenics. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Nicholas Agar (2008). Liberal Eugenics: In Defence of Human Enhancement. Wiley-Blackwell.
    In this provocative book, philosopher Nicholas Agar defends the idea that parents should be allowed to enhance their children’s characteristics. Gets away from fears of a Huxleyan ‘Brave New World’ or a return to the fascist eugenics of the past Written from a philosophically and scientifically informed point of view Considers real contemporary cases of parents choosing what kind of child to have Uses ‘moral images’ as a way to get readers with no background in philosophy to think about moral (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Nicholas Agar, Dan W. Brock, Paul Lauritzen & Bernard G. Prusak (forthcoming). The Debate Over Liberal Eugenics. Hastings Center Report.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Denis Alexander & Ronald L. Numbers (eds.) (2010). Biology and Ideology From Descartes to Dawkins. The University of Chicago Press.
    An accessible survey, this collection will enlighten historians of science, their students, practicing scientists, and anyone interested in the relationship ...
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. F. J. Allaun (1933). Eugenics and Capitalism. The Eugenics Review 24 (4):345.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. F. J. Allaun (1932). Eugenics and Socialism. The Eugenics Review 24 (1):73.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Garland E. Allen (2013). “Culling the Herd”: Eugenics and the Conservation Movement in the United States, 1900–1940. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 46 (1):31-72.
    While from a late twentieth- and early twenty-first century perspective, the ideologies of eugenics (controlled reproduction to eliminate the genetically unfit and promote the reproduction of the genetically fit) and environmental conservation and preservation, may seem incompatible, they were promoted simultaneously by a number of figures in the progressive era in the decades between 1900 and 1950. Common to the two movements were the desire to preserve the “best” in both the germ plasm of the human population and natural environments (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Garland E. Allen (2013). On the History of the International Eugenics Movement. Metascience 22 (2):383-386.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Garland E. Allen (2002). The Unfit: History of a Bad Idea. (2001) Elof A. Carlson, New York: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press. Bioessays 24 (8):765-766.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Joseph S. Alper (2002). The Double-Edged Helix Social Implications of Genetics in a Diverse Society. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  14. David Alton (2007). The Enemy of Eugenics. The Chesterton Review 33 (1-2):352-358.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1445