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  1. David C. Airey & Richard C. Shelton (2006). Praise for a Critical Perspective. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):405-405.
    The target article skillfully evaluates data on mental disorders in relation to predictions from evolutionary genetic theories of neutral evolution, balancing selection, and polygenic mutation-selection balance, resulting in a negative outlook for the likelihood of success finding genes for mental disorders. Nevertheless, new conceptualizations, methods, and continued interactions across disciplines provide hope. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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  2. Keiko Akagi, Jingfeng Li & David E. Symer (2013). How Do Mammalian Transposons Induce Genetic Variation? A Conceptual Framework. Bioessays 35 (4):397-407.
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  3. M. D. Akhundov, L. B. Bazhenov & V. N. Ignat'ev (1991). An American Looks at Soviet Science. Biology and Philosophy 6 (3):363-376.
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  4. Denis Alexander & Ronald L. Numbers (eds.) (2010). Biology and Ideology From Descartes to Dawkins. The University of Chicago Press.
    An accessible survey, this collection will enlighten historians of science, their students, practicing scientists, and anyone interested in the relationship ...
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  5. Douglas Allchin (2005). The Dilemma of Dominance. Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):427-451.
    The concept of dominance poses several dilemmas. First, while entrenched in genetics education, the metaphor of dominance promotes several misconceptions and misleading cultural perspectives. Second, the metaphors of power, prevalence and competition extend into science, shaping assumptions and default concepts. Third, because genetic causality is complex, the simplified concepts of dominance found in practice are highly contingent or inconsistent. The conceptual problems are illustrated in the history of studies on the evolution of dominance. Conceptual clarity may be fostered, I claim, (...)
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  6. Anita L. Allen (2009). The Poetry of Genetics: On the Pitfalls of Popularizing Science. Hypatia 24 (4):247 - 257.
    The role genetic inheritance plays in the way human beings look and behave is a question about the biology of human sexual reproduction, one that scientists connected with the Human Genome Project dashed to answer before the close of the twentieth century. This is also a question about politics, and, it turns out, poetry, because, as the example of Lucretius shows, poetry is an ancient tool for the popularization of science. "Popularization" is a good word for successful efforts to communicate (...)
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  7. Garland E. Allen (1974). Opposition to the Mendelian-Chromosome Theory: The Physiological and Developmental Genetics of Richard Goldschmidt. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 7 (1):49 - 92.
    We may now ask the question: In what historical perspective should we place the work of Richard Goldschmidt? There is no doubt that in the period 1910–1950 Goldschmidt was an important and prolific figure in the history of biology in general, and of genetics in particular. His textbook on physiological genetics, published in 1938, was an amazing compendium of ideas put forward in the previous half-century about how genes influence physiology and development. His earlier studies on the genetic and geographic (...)
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  8. C. Allibert (2008). Austronesian Migration and the Establishment of the Malagasy Civilization: Contrasted Readings in Linguistics, Archaeology, Genetics and Cultural Anthropology. Diogenes 55 (2):7 - 16.
    This article reviews and contrasts research findings in a variety of disciplines seeking corroboration for theories of settlement in Madagascar. Evidence is considered from the fields of linguistics, archaeology (studies of pottery), cultural anthropology and genetic analysis, leading to conclusions broadly supporting the thesis of Austronesian migrations directly to Madagascar from Kalimantan and Sulawesi around the 5th and 7th centuries CE, which combined with a Bantu group originating from the region of Mozambique. The article nevertheless warns against attributing too much (...)
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  9. G. Anderson (1999). Nondirectiveness in Prenatal Genetics: Patients Read Between the Lines. Nursing Ethics 6 (2):126-136.
    For decades questionnaires have been used to measure the cognitive and psychological effects of prenatal genetic testing, but little is known about why some women undergo testing and others decline. Research indicates that many factors influence decision making, including values and beliefs. What is often denied rather than recognized is that the professional and personal values and beliefs held by the health care provider influence the patient’s decision. It is assumed that, if genetic services are delivered in a nondirective manner, (...)
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  10. G. W. Anderson, R. B. Monsen & M. V. Rorty (2000). Nursing and Genetics: A Feminist Critique Moves Us Towards Transdisciplinary Teams. Nursing Ethics 7 (3):191-204.
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  11. G. Anderson & M. V. Rorty (2001). Key Points for Developing an International Declaration on Nursing, Human Rights, Human Genetics and Public Health Policy. Nursing Ethics 8 (3):259-271.
    Human rights legislation pertaining to applications of human genetic science is still lacking at an international level. Three international human rights documents now serve as guidelines for countries wishing to develop such legislation. These were drafted and adopted by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, the Human Genome Organization, and the Council of Europe. It is critically important that the international nursing community makes known its philosophy and practice-based knowledge relating to ethics and human rights, and contributes to (...)
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  12. J. Aracena & J. Demongeot (2004). Mathematical Methods for Inferring Regulatory Networks Interactions: Application to Genetic Regulation. Acta Biotheoretica 52 (4).
    This paper deals with the problem of reconstruction of the intergenic interaction graph from the raw data of genetic co-expression coming with new technologies of bio-arrays (DMA-arrays, protein-arrays, etc.). These new imaging devices in general only give information about the asymptotical part (fixed configurations of co-expression or limit cycles of such configurations) of the dynamical evolution of the regulatory networks (genetic and/or proteic) underlying the functioning of living systems. Extracting the casual structure and interaction coefficients of a gene interaction network (...)
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  13. Armando Aranda-Anzaldo (2001). Cancer Development and Progression: A Non-Adaptive Process Driven by Genetic Drift. Acta Biotheoretica 49 (2).
    The current mainstream in cancer research favours the idea that malignant tumour initiation is the result of a genetic mutation. Tumour development and progression is then explained as a sort of micro-evolutionary process, whereby an initial genetic alteration leads to abnormal proliferation of a single cell that leads to a population of clonally derived cells. It is widely claimed that tumour progression is driven by natural selection, based on the assumption that the initial tumour cells acquire some properties that endow (...)
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  14. A. M. Arias (2005). Mendel's Legacy: The Origins of Classical Genetics By Elof Axel Carlson. Bioessays 27 (7):761.
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  15. Alfonso Martinez Arias (2005). Book Review:Mendel's Legacy: The Origins of Classical Genetics. [REVIEW] Bioessays 27 (7):761-762.
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  16. Wallace Arthur (1987). Theories of Life: Darwin, Mendel, and Beyond. Penguin Books.
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  17. Paul Atkinson (2006). New Genetics, New Indentities. Routledge.
    New genetic technologies and their applications in biomedicine have important implications for social identities in contemporary societies. In medicine, new genetics is increasingly important for the identification of health and disease, the imputation of personal and familial risk, and the moral status of those identified as having genetic susceptibility for inherited conditions. There are also consequent transformations in national and ethnic collective identity, and the body and its investigation is potentially transformed by the possibilities of genetic investigations and modifications (including (...)
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  18. Francisco J. Ayala (1997). Genetics and the Origin of Species: National Academy of Sciences Colloquium, Irvine, California, 30 January‐1 February, 1997. [REVIEW] Bioessays 19 (7):651-652.
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  19. Gerrit Balen (1987). Conceptual Tensions Between Theory and Program: The Chromosome Theory and the Mendelian Research Program. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 2 (4):435-461.
    Laudan's thesis that conceptual problem solving is at least as important as empirical problem solving in scientific research is given support by a study of the relation between the chromosome theory and the Mendelian research program. It will be shown that there existed a conceptual tension between the chromosome theory and the Mendelian program. This tension was to be resolved by changing the constraints of the Mendelian program. The relation between the chromosome theory and the Mendelian program is shown to (...)
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  20. Eric Bapteste & Richard M. Burian (2010). On the Need for Integrative Phylogenomics, and Some Steps Toward its Creation. Biology and Philosophy 25 (4):711-736.
    Recently improved understanding of evolutionary processes suggests that tree-based phylogenetic analyses of evolutionary change cannot adequately explain the divergent evolutionary histories of a great many genes and gene complexes. In particular, genetic diversity in the genomes of prokaryotes, phages, and plasmids cannot be fit into classic tree-like models of evolution. These findings entail the need for fundamental reform of our understanding of molecular evolution and the need to devise alternative apparatus for integrated analysis of these genomes. We advocate the development (...)
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  21. Ana Barahona (2012). The History of Genetics in Mexico in the Light of A Cultural History of Heredity. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 35 (1):69-74.
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  22. Ana Barahonas, Susana Pinar & Francisco J. Ayala (2005). Introduction and Institutionalization of Genetics in Mexico Ana Barahona, Susana Pinar and Francisco J. Ayala. Journal of the History of Biology 38 (2):273 - 299.
    We explore the distinctive characteristics of Mexico's society, politics and history that impacted the establishment of genetics in Mexico, as a new disciplinary field that began in the early 20th century and was consolidated and institutionalized in the second half. We identify about three stages in the institutionalization of genetics in Mexico. The first stage can be characterized by Edmundo Taboada, who was the leader of a research program initiated during the Cárdenas government (1934-1940), which was primarily directed towards improving (...)
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  23. John Beatty (1982). The Insights and Oversights of Molecular Genetics: The Place of the Evolutionary Perspective. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1982:341 - 355.
    A general case about the insights and oversights of molecular genetics is argued for by considering two specific cases: the first concerns the bearing of molecular genetics on Mendelian genetics, and the second concerns the bearing of molecular genetics on the replicability of the genetic material. As in the first case, it is argued that Mendel's law of segregation cannot be explained wholly in terms of molecular genetics--the law demands evolutionary scrutiny as well. In the second case, it is argued (...)
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  24. Matthias Beck (2007). Illness, Disease and Sin: The Connection Between Genetics and Spirituality. Christian Bioethics 13 (1):67-89.
    The New Testament, while rejecting any superficial connection between illness and sin, does not reject a possible connection between illness and a person's relationship with God. An example can be seen in the story of the young blind man who was healed (St. John 9:3). His blindness does not result from any fault he or his parents had committed but apparently from God's wish to reveal his own healing power. The inner blindness of the Pharisees is a different type of (...)
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  25. Nikola Biller (2002). Ole Doering (Ed.), Chinese Scientists and Responsibility. Ethical Issues of Human Genetics in Chinese and International Contexts. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (1):95-96.
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  26. National Reference Center For Bioet (2008). News From the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature (NRCBL) and the National Information Resource on Ethics and Human Genetics (NIREHG). Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (4):399-403.
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  27. Michael Bölker (2004). Bear Ye One Another's Genetic Burdens: The Price of Diversity and Complexity. Poiesis and Praxis 3 (s 1-2):73-82.
    Genetic variability and diversity are the result of a mutation-selection balance that acts permanently within and between species. The presence of deleterious mutations is a necessary consequence of this process and thus “the price paid by a species for its capacity for further evolution” (Haldane 1937, Am Nat 71:337–349). Recent estimations of mutation rate in the human lineage has revived the debate as to whether the high number of deleterious mutations poses a severe problem for the future of mankind. Theoretical (...)
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  28. Christophe Bonneuil (2006). Mendelism, Plant Breeding and Experimental Cultures: Agriculture and the Development of Genetics in France. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 39 (2):281 - 308.
    The article reevaluates the reception of Mendelism in France, and more generally considers the complex relationship between Mendelism and plant breeding in the first half on the 20th century. It shows on the one side that agricultural research and higher education institutions have played a key role in the development and institutionalization of genetics in France, whereas university biologists remained reluctant to accept this approach on heredity. But on the other side, plant breeders, and agricultural researchers, despite an interest in (...)
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  29. Thorsten Botz-Bornstein (2010). Genes, Memes, and the Chinese Concept of Wen : Toward a Nature/Culture Model of Genetics. Philosophy East and West 60 (2):pp. 167-186.
    The Chinese concept of wen is examined here in the context of contemporary gene theory and the "cultural branch" of gene theory called "memetics." The Chinese notion of wen is an untranslatable term meaning "pattern," "structure," "writing," and "literature." Wen hua—generally translated as "culture"—signifies the process through which one adopts wen. However, this process is not simply one of civilizational mimesis or imitation but the "creation" of a new pattern. Within a gene-wen debate we are able to read genes neither (...)
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  30. Clive E. Bowman (2009). Megavariate Genetics: What You Find Is What You Go Looking For. Biological Theory 4 (1):21-28.
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  31. C. Loring Brace (2007). Genetics and the Control of Evolution. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (4):366-367.
    This book presents a survey of the molecular basis for the genetic control of living organisms and their evolution. The authors consider four dimensions of control over what shapes life forms: genetic, epigenetic, behavioral, and symbolic/cultural. They pay particular attention to the epigenetic realm, and they defend a view recognizing the genetic incorporation of acquired characteristics – a neo-Lamarckian tack.
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  32. Lundy Braun (2002). Race, Ethnicity, and Health: Can Genetics Explain Disparities? Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 45 (2):159-174.
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  33. James Braund & Douglas G. Sutton (2008). The Case of Heinrich Wilhelm Poll (1877-1939): A German-Jewish Geneticist, Eugenicist, Twin Researcher, and Victim of the Nazis. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 41 (1):1 - 35.
    This paper uses a reconstruction of the life and career of Heinrich Poll as a window into developments and professional relationships in the biological sciences in Germany in the period from the beginning of the twentieth century to the Nazi seizure of power in 1933. Poll's intellectual work involved an early transition from morphometric physical anthropology to comparative evolutionary studies, and also found expression in twin research - a field in which he was an acknowledged early pioneer. His advocacy of (...)
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  34. Rose M. Brewer (2006). Thinking Critically About Race and Genetics. Journal of Law, Medicine Ethics 34 (3):513-519.
  35. B. Brock (2006). Book Review: Brave New World? Theology, Ethics and the Human Genome; Re-Ordering Nature: Theology, Society and the New Genetics. [REVIEW] Studies in Christian Ethics 19 (1):110-116.
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  36. Dan W. Brock (2001). Genetics and Confidentiality. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (3):34-35.
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  37. Patrick L. Brockett & E. Susan Tankersley (1997). The Genetics Revolution, Economics, Ethics and Insurance. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (15):1661-1676.
    This paper considers the revolutionary developments occurring in the field of genetic mapping and the genetic identification of disease propensities. These breakthroughs are discussed relative to the ethical and economic implications for the insurance industry. Individual's privacy rights and rights to employment must be weighed against the insurers desire for better estimates of future loss costs associated with health, life and other insurances. These are in turn related to the fundamental conception of insurance as a financial intermediary versus insurance as (...)
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  38. Baruch Brody (2002). Allen Buchanan, Dan Brock, Norman Daniels, and Daniel Wikler, From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice: Buchanan, Allen ; Brock, Dan ; Daniels, Norman ; and Wikler, Daniel . From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. Pp. 398. $33.00 (Cloth); $23.00 (Paper). [REVIEW] Ethics 112 (2):358-361.
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  39. S. D. M. Brown (1989). The Mouse Genome at Oxford: What Can Mouse Gene Mapping Do for Mammalian Genetics? Bioessays 11 (6):191-193.
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  40. Roger Brownsword, W. R. Cornish & Margaret Llewelyn (eds.) (1998). Law and Human Genetics: Regulating a Revolution. Hart Pub..
    This special issue of the Modern Law Review addresses a range of key issues - conceptual, ethical, political and practical - arising from the regulatory ...
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  41. Grzegorz Bugajak (2011). Fears of Science. Nature and Human Actions. In Adam Świeżyński (ed.), Knowledge and Values, Wyd. UKSW, Warszawa. 157–170.
    The paper points to quite a surprising change of the attitude among general public towards science and scientific progress that seems to have happened at the turn of the 20th century, and, to an extent, stays on: from holding scientific enterprise in high esteem to treating scientists and fortune˗tellers on a par, from hopes that science will eventually resolve our problems, both theoretical and practical, to anxiety and fear of what scientific experiments can bring about in nature and human life. (...)
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  42. Grzegorz Bugajak (2004). Theology and Genetic Engineering: New Incarnation of the Old Conflict? In Ulf Görman, Willem B. Drees & Hubert Meisinger (eds.), Studies in Science and Theology, vol. 9(2003–2004), Lunds Universitet, Lund. 127–143.
    It is widely acknowledged among science˗and˗theology thinkers – or at least desired – that we have left behind the era of conflict between science and religion. An approach which avoids conflict by pointing out that science and religion employ two different methodologies and therefore occupy two separate magisteria, is, however, unsatisfactory for both – the advocates of a fruitful dialogue between these two realms of human activity as well as the most vigorous opponents of possible conciliation, and the latter still (...)
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  43. Richard M. Burian (2005). The Epistemology of Development, Evolution, and Genetics: Selected Essays. Cambridge University Press.
    The essays in this collection examine developments in three fundamental biological disciplines--embryology, evolutionary biology, and genetics--in conflict with each other for much of the twentieth century. They consider key methodological problems and the difficulty of overcoming them. Richard Burian interweaves historical appreciation of the settings within which scientists work, substantial knowledge of the biological problems at stake and the methodological and philosophical issues faced in integrating biological knowledge drawn from disparate sources.
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  44. Richard M. Burian (1993). Technique, Task Definition, and the Transition From Genetics to Molecular Genetics: Aspects of the Work on Protein Synthesis in the Laboratories of J. Monod and P. Zamecnik. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 26 (3):387 - 407.
    In biology proteins are uniquely important. They are not to be classed with polysaccharides, for example, which by comparison play a very minor role. Their nearest rivals are the nucleic acids....The main function of proteins is to act as enzymes....In the protein molecule Nature has devised a unique instrument in which an underlying simplicity is used to express great subtlety and versatility; it is impossible to see molecular biology in proper perspective until this peculiar combination of virtues has been clearly (...)
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  45. Richard M. Burian (1987). Realist Methodology in Genetics. In Nancy J. Nersessian (ed.), The Process of Science: Contemporary Philosophical Approaches to Understanding Scientific Practice. Distributors for the United States and Canada, Kluwer Academic Publishers.
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  46. Richard M. Burian (1982). Book Review:Problems of Genetics William Bateson. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 49 (1):147-.
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  47. Richard M. Burian, Robert C. Richardson & Wim J. Van der Steen (1996). Against Generality: Meaning in Genetics and Philosophy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 27 (1):1-29.
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  48. Justine Burley (2004). Morality and the "New Genetics". In Ronald Dworkin & Justine Burley (eds.), Dworkin and His Critics: With Replies by Dworkin. Blackwell Pub.. 170--192.
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  49. David M. Buss (2006). The Evolutionary Genetics of Personality: Does Mutation Load Signal Relationship Load? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (4):409-409.
    The mutation-selection hypothesis may extend to understanding normal personality variation. Traits such as emotional stability, agreeableness, and conscientiousness figure strongly in mate selection and show evidence of non-additive genetic variance. They are linked with reproductively relevant outcomes, including longevity, resource acquisition, and mating success. Evolved difference-detection adaptations may function to spurn individuals whose high mutation load signals a burdensome relationship load. (Published Online November 9 2006).
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  50. Joel C. Eissenberg (2007). Looking Beyond Genetics. Bioessays 29 (6):609-610.
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