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  1. Mohammed Abed (2006). Clarifying the Concept of Genocide. Metaphilosophy 37 (3-4):308–330.
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  2. Howard Adelman (2008). Blaming the United Nations. Journal of International Political Theory 4 (1):9-33.
    After placing the issue of holding international institutional agents responsible within a theoretical context, this article takes up the case of the UN's role in the Rwandan genocide. Through an examination of the extensive literature that deals either directly or incidentally with the UN's role and responsibility during the period prior to the outbreak of mass killing on 6 April 1994, this essay tests a slightly modified version of Toni Erskine's theory of why international institutional agents can be held responsible (...)
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  3. Andrew Altman (2012). Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity: Dispelling the Conceptual Fog. Social Philosophy and Policy 29 (1):280-308.
    Genocide and crimes against humanity are among the core crimes of international law, but they also carry great moral resonance due to their indissoluble link to the atrocities of the Nazi regime and to other egregious episodes of mass violence. However, the concepts of genocide and crimes against humanity are not well understood, even by the international lawyers and jurists who are most concerned with them. A conceptual fog hovers around the discussion of these two categories of crime. In this (...)
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  4. Jennifer Balint (2001). Law's Constitutive Possibilities: Reconstruction and Reconciliation in the Wake of Genocide and State Crime. In Emilios A. Christodoulidis & Scott Veitch (eds.), Lethe's Law: Justice, Law and Ethics in Reconciliation. Hart Publishing.
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  5. Debra B. Bergoffen (2003). February 22, 2001: Toward a Politics of the Vulnerable Body. Hypatia 18 (1):116-134.
    : On February 22, 2001, three Bosnian Serb soldiers were found guilty of crimes against humanity. Their offense? Rape. This is the first time that rape has been prosecuted and condemned as a crime against humanity. Appealing to Jacques Derrida's democracy of the perhaps and Judith Butler's politics of performative contradiction, I see this judgment inaugurating a politics of the vulnerable body which challenges current understandings of evil, war crimes, and crimes against humanity.
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  6. Tim Blackmore, Jenifer Swanson, Shawn Mckinney, Joan Grassbaugh Forry, Yochai Ataria & Paul Neiman (2013). Ender's Game and Philosophy: Genocide is Child's Play. Open Court.
    In Ender's Game and Philosophy: Genocide is Child's Play, twenty-eight philosophers explore the fascinating issues raised in Orson Scott Card's popular and controversial novel Ender's Game, and its sequels, which have been discovered and rediscovered by generations of fans. Card's stories highlight the violence and cruelty of children, the role of empathy and failure of communication in war, the military manipulation of people by disinformation, and the balance of individual dignity with the social good.
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  7. Lawrence Blum * (2004). The Poles, the Jews and the Holocaust: Reflections on an AME Trip to Auschwitz. Journal of Moral Education 33 (2):131-148.
    Two trips to Auschwitz provide a context for reflection on fundamental issues in civic and moral education. Custodians of the Auschwitz historical site are currently aware of its responsibility to humanity to educate about the genocide against the Jews, as a morally distinct element in its presentation of Nazi crimes at Auschwitz. Prior to the fall of Communism in 1989, the site's message was dominated by a misleading civic narrative about Polish victimization by, and resistance to, Naziism. In this article, (...)
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  8. Petar Bojanic (2013). The Institution of Group and Genocidal Acts. Filozofija I Društvo 24 (3):123-134.
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  9. William C. Bradford (2006). Acknowledging and Rectifying the Genocide of American Indians: "Why is It That They Carry Their Lives on Their Fingernails?". Metaphilosophy 37 (3-4):515–543.
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  10. William Brennan (1980). Medical Holocausts. Nordland Pub. International.
    v. 1. Exterminative medicine in Nazi Germany and contemporary America -- v. 2. The language of exterminative medicine in Nazi Germany and contemporary America.
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  11. Emily Budick (2012). Fifty Key Thinkers on the Holocaust and Genocide. By Paul R. Bartrop and Steven Leonard Jacobs. The European Legacy 17 (6):837-837.
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  12. Claudia Card (2010). Confronting Evils: Terrorism, Torture, Genocide. Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Part I. The Concept of Evil: 1. Inexcusable wrongs; 2. Between good and evil; 3. Complicity in structural evils; 4. To whom (or to what?) can evils be done?; Part II. Terrorism, Torture, Genocide: 5. Counterterrorism; 6. Low-profile terrorism; 7. Conscientious torture?; 8. Ordinary torture; 9. Genocide is social death; 10. Genocide by forced impregnation; Bibliography; Filmography; Websites; Index.
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  13. Claudia Card (2003). Genocide and Social Death. Hypatia 18 (1):63-79.
    : Social death, central to the evil of genocide (whether the genocide is homicidal or primarily cultural), distinguishes genocide from other mass murders. Loss of social vitality is loss of identity and thereby of meaning for one's existence. Seeing social death at the center of genocide takes our focus off body counts and loss of individual talents, directing us instead to mourn losses of relationships that create community and give meaning to the development of talents.
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  14. Claudia Card (2002). The Atrocity Paradigm: A Theory of Evil. Oxford University Press.
    What distinguishes evils from ordinary wrongs? Is hatred a necessarily evil? Are some evils unforgivable? Are there evils we should tolerate? What can make evils hard to recognize? Are evils inevitable? How can we best respond to and live with evils? Claudia Card offers a secular theory of evil that responds to these questions and more. Evils, according to her theory, have two fundamental components. One component is reasonably foreseeable intolerable harm -- harm that makes a life indecent and impossible (...)
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  15. Claudia Card & Armen T. Marsoobian (2006). Introduction: Genocide's Aftermath. Metaphilosophy 37 (3-4):299–307.
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  16. Alisa L. Carse & Lynne Tirrell (2010). Forgiving Grave Wrongs. In Christopher Allers & Marieke Smit (eds.), Forgiveness In Perspective. Rodopi Press.
    We introduce what we call the Emergent Model of forgiving, which is a process-based relational model conceptualizing forgiving as moral and normative repair in the wake of grave wrongs. In cases of grave wrongs, which shatter the victim’s life, the Classical Model of transactional forgiveness falls short of illuminating how genuine forgiveness can be achieved. In a climate of persistent threat and distrust, expressions of remorse, rituals and gestures of apology, and acts of reparation are unable to secure the moral (...)
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  17. Sonali Chakravarti (2008). More Than "Cheap Sentimentality": Victim Testimony at Nuremberg, the Eichmann Trial, and Truth Commissions. Constellations 15 (2):223-235.
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  18. Ann-Marie Cook (2010). Based on the True Story' : Cinema's Mythologised Vision of the Rwandan Genocide. In Nancy Billias (ed.), Promoting and Producing Evil. Rodopi.
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  19. Ann E. Cudd (2008). Rape and Enforced Pregnancy as Femicide: Comments on Claudia Card's “The Paradox of Genocidal Rape Aimed at Enforced Pregnancy”. Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (S1):190-199.
  20. Victoria Davion (2009). Feminist Perspectives on Global Warming, Genocide, and Card's Theory of Evil. Hypatia 24 (1):160 - 177.
    This essay explores several moral issues raised by global warming through the lens of Claudia Card's theory of evil. I focus on Alaskan villages in the sub-Arctic whose residents must relocate owing to extreme erosion, melting sea ice, and rising water levels. I use Card's discussion of genocide as social death to argue that failure to help these groups maintain their unique cultural identities can be thought of as genocidal.
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  21. Nigel Eltringham (2003). The Challenge of Representing the Rwandan Genocide. In Patricia Caplan (ed.), The Ethics of Anthropology: Debates and Dilemmas. Routledge. 96.
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  22. E. C. Eze (2005). Epistemic Conditions for Genocide. In John K. Roth (ed.), Genocide and Human Rights: A Philosophical Guide. Palgrave Macmillan. 115--129.
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  23. Andrew Gordon Fiala (2005). Get 'Em All! Kill 'Em! Genocide, Terrorism, Righteous Communities (Review). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 19 (4):262-265.
  24. Andrew Gordon Fiala (2005). Get 'Em All! Kill 'Em! Genocide, Terrorism, Righteous Communities (Review). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 19 (4):262-265.
  25. Michael Freeman (1991). Speaking About the Unspeakable: Genocide and Philosophy. Journal of Applied Philosophy 8 (1):3-18.
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  26. R. Z. Friedman (1992). Act and Idea in the Nazi Genocide Berel Lang Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1990, Xxii + 258 P. Dialogue 31 (01):171-.
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  27. Raimond Gaita (2011). Literature, Genocide, and the Philosophy of International Law. In Rowan Cruft, Matthew H. Kramer & Mark R. Reiff (eds.), Crime, Punishment, and Responsibility: The Jurisprudence of Antony Duff. Oup Oxford.
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  28. Jennifer L. Geddes (2003). Banal Evil and Useless Knowledge: Hannah Arendt and Charlotte Delbo on Evil After the Holocaust. Hypatia 18 (1):104-115.
    : Hannah Arendt's and Charlotte Delbo's writings about the Holocaust trouble our preconceptions about those who do evil and those who suffer evil. Their jarring terms "banal evil" and "useless knowledge" point to limitations and temptations facing scholars of evil. While Arendt helps us to resist the temptation to mythologize evil, Delbo helps us to resist the temptation to domesticate suffering.
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  29. Hannes Gerhardt (2011). Giorgio Agamben's Lessons and Limitations in Confronting the Problem of Genocide. Journal of Global Ethics 7 (1):5 - 17.
    In this paper, I work through the possible contours of an anti-genocide based on a framework informed by the work of Giorgio Agamben. Such a framework posits the inherent need to circumvent sovereign power within any form of normative activism. To begin, I show how the nascent anti-genocide movement promotes an ideal in which ?Western? states, particularly the USA, accept the global responsibility to protect persecuted life beyond national boundaries. Using Agamben, I argue that this vision also entails an acceptance (...)
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  30. Ninon Grangé (2009). Les génocides et l'état de guerre. Astérion 6.
    La définition du mot « génocide » relève d’emblée d’ambiguïtés lexicales et conceptuelles. À l’origine juridique, le terme divise les historiens qui y voient tantôt une spécificité du xxe siècle, tantôt un hapax avec la « solution finale », tantôt un phénomène plus ancien avec le moment fondamental de la colonisation ouverte à l’idée d’extermination. Ainsi, la prudence fera préférer la notion de « massacre de masse ».L’instrumentalisation politique de la référence à l’état de guerre est un parallélisme plutôt qu’une (...)
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  31. Ilan Gur‐Ze'ev (1998). The Morality of Acknowledging/Not‐Acknowledging the Other's Holocaust/Genocide. Journal of Moral Education 27 (2):161-177.
    Abstract The issue of producing and controlling the memories of the Holocaust is evaluated in this paper as a valid universal example of the struggle over self?identity and the recognition of ?the other? as a moral subject. The normal realisation of morality is presented as part of the denial of the other's identity, knowledge and value. The dialectics of the memories of the Holocaust and the possibility of a non?violent moral education is examined by questioning its treatment of the suffering (...)
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  32. V. Harle (2000). Is the Holocaust Unique? Perspectives on Comparative Genocide. Edited by Alan S. Rosenbaum. The European Legacy 5 (2):300-300.
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  33. V. Harle (1999). The Bridge Betrayed: Religion and Genocide in Bosnia. By Michael A. Sells. The European Legacy 4:98-98.
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  34. Naomi Head (2011). Bringing Reflective Judgement Into International Relations: Exploring the Rwandan Genocide. Journal of Global Ethics 6 (2):191-204.
    This article explores the role of reflective judgement in international relations through the lens of the Rwandan genocide in 1994. It argues that Hannah Arendt's writings on reflective judgement, and the dual perspectives of actor and spectator she articulates, offer us a set of conceptual tools with which to examine the failure of the international community to respond to the genocide as well as more broadly to understand the moral dilemmas posed by such crimes against humanity. Having identified elements which (...)
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  35. Agnes Heller (2010). Radical Evil in Modernity: On Genocide, Totalitarian Terror and the Holocaust. Thesis Eleven 101 (1):106-117.
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  36. Maureen S. Hiebert (2006). The Killing Trap: Genocide in the Twentieth Century - by Manus I. Midlarsky. Ethics and International Affairs 20 (4):533–534.
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  37. Sarah Lucia Hoagland (2007). Review Essay: Undivided Rights: Women of Color Organize for Reproductive Justice, Edited by Jael Silliman, Marlene Gerber Fried, Loretta Ross, and Elena R. Guti�Rrez; Policing the National Body: Race, Gender and Criminalization, Edited by Jael Silliman and Anannya Bhattacharjee; and Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide, by Andrea Smith. Hypatia 22 (2):182-188.
  38. P. Hockenos (forthcoming). Michael A. Sells, The Bridge Betrayed: Religion and Genocide in Bosnia. Radical Philosophy.
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  39. Michael H. Hoffheimer (2001). Hegel, Race, Genocide. Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (S1):35-62.
  40. Dr Tim Horner (2012). We Cannot Forget: Interviews with Survivors of the 1994 Genocide in Rwanda. Eds. Samual Totten and Rafiki Ubaldo. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 21 (2):103-104.
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  41. M. Horoszewicz (1999). Methodology of Genocide: A Comparative Study. Dialogue and Universalism 9:125-131.
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  42. Aleksandar Jokic (2007). Genocide and Human Rights: A Philosophical Guide - Edited by John K. Roth. Philosophical Books 48 (1):94-96.
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  43. D. H. Jones (2005). The Right to Life, Genocide and the Problem of Bystander State. In John K. Roth (ed.), Genocide and Human Rights: A Philosophical Guide. Palgrave Macmillan. 265--276.
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  44. Emmanuel M. Katongole (2005). Christianity, Tribalism, and the Rwandan Genocide. Logos 8 (3).
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  45. Judith W. Kay (2013). Middle Agents as Marginalized: How the Rwanda Genocide Challenges Ethics From the Margins. Journal of the Society of Christian Ethics 33 (2):21-40.
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  46. B. Kiernan (2004). The First Genocide: Carthage, 146 BC. Diogenes 51 (3):27-39.
    Some features of the ideology motivating the Roman destruction of Carthage in 146 BC have surprisingly modern echoes in 20th-century genocides. Racial, religious or cultural prejudices, gender and other social hierarchies, territorial expansionism, and an idealization of cultivation all characterize the thinking of Cato the Censor, like that of more recent perpetrators. The tragedy of Carthage, its details lost with most of the works of Livy and other ancient authors, and concealed behind allegory in Virgil’s Aeneid, became known to early (...)
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  47. Ben Kiernan (2003). Le Premier Génocide : Carthage, 146 A.C. Diogène 203 (3):32-.
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  48. David Konstan (2009). Blood and Soil: A World History of Genocide and Extermination From Sparta to Darfur. Common Knowledge 15 (3):508-508.
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  49. William Korey (1997). The United States and the Genocide Convention: Leading Advocate and Leading Obstacle. Ethics and International Affairs 11 (1):271–290.
    Korey provides a description of the long struggle for ratification of the Genocide Convention, detailing decades of work by a committee of fifty-two nongovernmental organizations lobbying the Senate and the American Bar Association, the treaty's key opponent.
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  50. Karen Kovach (2006). Genocide and the Moral Agency of Ethnic Groups. Metaphilosophy 37 (3-4):331–352.
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