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  1. Robin O. Andreasen & Milo J. Aukerman (2002). The Human Genome Project: A Reply to Rosenberg. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 17 (5):673-678.
    In this paper we discuss the scientific value of the human genome project. To what extent is the data obtained by sequencing the entire human genome useful in the gene dicovery process? Responding to Alex Rosenberg' skepticism about the value of such data, we maintain that brute sequence data is much more useful than he suggests.
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  2. R. I. X. Andreassen (1991). Should Ethical Concerns Regulate Science? The European Experience with the Human Genome Project. A Report Form Denmark. Bioethics 5 (3):250–256.
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  3. Rachel A. Ankeny (2001). Model Organisms as Models: Understanding the 'Lingua Franca' of the Human Genome Project. Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2001 (3):S251-.
    Through an examination of the actual research strategies and assumptions underlying the Human Genome Project (HGP), it is argued that the epistemic basis of the initial model organism programs is not best understood as reasoning via causal analog models (CAMs). In order to answer a series of questions about what is being modeled and what claims about the models are warranted, a descriptive epistemological method is employed that uses historical techniques to develop detailed accounts which, in turn, help to reveal (...)
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  4. Fred C. Boogerd, Frank J. Bruggeman, Jan-Hendrik S. Hofmeyr & Hans V. Westerhoff (eds.) (2007). Systems Biology: Philosophical Foundations. Elsevier.
    Systems biology is a vigorous and expanding discipline, in many ways a successor to genomics and perhaps unprecendented in its combination of biology with a ...
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  5. Susanne Boshammer, Matthias Kayss, Christa Runtenberg & Johann S. Ach (1998). Discussing Hugo: The German Debate on the Ethical Implications of the Human Genome Project. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (3):324 – 333.
    The current German criticism of HUGO centers around the term ‘human dignity’; consenquentialist and autonomy-based arguments are used. The debate culminates in questioning the integrity of bioethics as a scholarly discipline and has created a heterogeneous coalition of disparate political and social groups that oppose any research that would facilitate genetic pre-selection of human characteristics.
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  6. Teresa Brady (1995). The Ethical Implications of the Human Genome Project for the Workplace. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 10 (1):47-56.
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  7. Christian Byk (1992). The Human Genome Project and the Social Contract: A Law Policy Approach. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (4):371-380.
    For the first time in history, genetics will enable science to completely identify each human as genetically unique. Will this knowledge reinforce the trend for more individual liberties or will it create a ‘brave new world’? A law policy approach to the problems raised by the human genome project shows how far our democratic institutions are from being the proper forum to discuss such issues. Because of the fears and anxiety raised in the population, and also because of its wide (...)
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  8. Ruth Chadwick & Charles Ngwena (1995). The Human Genome Project, Predictive Testing and Insurance Contracts: Ethical and Legal Responses. [REVIEW] Res Publica 1 (2):115-129.
    The economic costs to the insurers of complementary routine genetic testing would outweigh the benefits. However, should testing technology in future be refined so as to produce a cheap and reliable test, there is no reason why insurers might not take up predictive testing as part of the normal underwriting process. It is this possibility which justifies formulating a pre-emptive policy. At the very least, there are reasons for promoting and protecting the welfare of the proposer so as to redress (...)
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  9. Laurel Cooper, Ramona Walls, Justin Elser, Maria A. Gandolfo, Dennis W. Stevenson & Barry Smith (2013). The Plant Ontology as a Tool for Comparative Plant Anatomy and Genomic Analyses. Plant and Cell Physiology 54:1-23..
    The Plant Ontology (PO; http://www.plantontology.org/) is a publicly-available, collaborative effort to develop and maintain a controlled, structured vocabulary (“ontology”) of terms to describe plant anatomy, morphology and the stages of plant development. The goals of the PO are to link (annotate) gene expression and phenotype data to plant structures and stages of plant development, using the data model adopted by the Gene Ontology. From its original design covering only rice, maize and Arabidopsis, the scope of the PO has been expanded (...)
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  10. Frank C. Dukepoo (1998). Commentary on “Scientific Limitations and Ethical Ramifications of a Non-Representative Human Genome Project: African American Responses” (F. Jackson). [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):171-180.
  11. Lisa Gannett, The Human Genome Project. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  12. Patricia S. Greenspan (1993). Free Will and the Genome Project. Philosophy and Public Affairs 22 (1):31-43.
    Popular and scientific accounts of the U.S. Human Genome Project often express concern about the implications of the project for the philosophic question of free will and responsibility. However, on its standard construal within philosophy, the question of free will versus determinism poses no special problems in relation to genetic research. The paper identifies a variant version of the free will question, free will versus internal constraint, that might well pose a threat to notions of individual autonomy and virtue in (...)
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  13. Frederick Grinnell (2000). Philosophy of Biology and the Human Genome Project. Biology and Philosophy 15 (4):595-601.
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  14. M. Nizam Isa (2002). Ethical Issues of the Human Genome Project. In Abu Bakar Abdul Majeed (ed.), Bioethics: Ethics in the Biotechnology Century. Institute of Islamic Understanding Malaysia.
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  15. Fatimah Jackson (1998). Scientific Limitations and Ethical Ramifications of a Non-Representative Human Genome Project: African American Response. [REVIEW] Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):155-170.
    The Human Genome Project (HGP) represents a massive merging of science and technology in the name of all humanity. While the disease aspects of HGP-generated data have received the greatest publicity and are the strongest rationale for the project, it should be remembered that the HGP has, as its goal the sequencing of all 100,000 human genes and the accurate depiction of the ancestral and functional relationships among these genes. The HGP will thus be constructing the molecular taxonomic norm for (...)
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  16. David O. Jones, Ian G. Cowell & Prim B. Singh (2000). Mammalian Chromodomain Proteins: Their Role in Genome Organisation and Expression. Bioessays 22 (2):124-137.
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  17. Eric T. Juengst (1996). Self-Critical Federal Science? The Ethics Experiment Within the U.S. Human Genome Project. Social Philosophy and Policy 13 (02):63-.
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  18. Michael M. Kaback (2001). The "Asilomar Process" and the Human Genome Project. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 44 (2):230-234.
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  19. Rainer Kattel & Margit Suurna (2008). The Rise and Fall of the Estonian Genome Project. Studies in Ethics, Law, and Technology 2 (2).
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  20. Ulrich Krohs & Werner Callebaut (2007). Data Without Models Merging with Models Without Data. In Fred C. Boogerd, Frank J. Bruggeman, Jan-Hendrik S. Hofmeyr & Hans V. Westerhoff (eds.), Systems Biology: Philosophical Foundations. Elsevier. 181--213.
    Systems biology is largely tributary to genomics and other “omic” disciplines that generate vast amounts of structural data. “Omics”, however, lack a theoretical framework that would allow using these data sets as such (rather than just tiny bits that are extracted by advanced data-mining techniques) to build explanatory models that help understand physiological processes. Systems biology provides such a framework by adding a dynamic dimension to merely structural “omics”. It makes use of bottom-up and top-down models. The former are based (...)
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  21. Graciela Kuechle & Diego Rios (2012). A Game-Theoretic Analysis of the Baldwin Effect. Erkenntnis 77 (1):31-49.
    The Baldwin effect is a process by which learnt traits become gradually incorporated into the genome through a Darwinian mechanism. From its inception, the Baldwin effect has been regarded with skepticism. The objective of this paper is to relativize this assessment. Our contribution is two-fold. To begin with, we provide a taxonomy of the different arguments that have been advocated in its defense, and distinguish between three justificatory dimensions—feasibility, explanatory relevance and likelihood—that have been unduly conflated. Second, we sharpen the (...)
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  22. Eric S. Lander (1998). Scientific Commentary: The Scientific Foundations and Medical and Social Prospects of the Human Genome Project. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 26 (3):184-188.
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  23. Andrew B. Lane & Duncan J. Clarke (2012). Genome Instability: Does Genetic Diversity Amplification Drive Tumorigenesis? Bioessays 34 (11):963-972.
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  24. Abby Lippman (1999). The Human Genome Project: Perilous Promises? Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 2 (1):47-49.
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  25. Darryl Macer (1991). Whose Genome Project? Bioethics 5 (3):183–211.
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  26. Bo Andreassen Rix (1991). Should Ethical Concerns Regulate Science? The European Experience with the Human Genome Project. Bioethics 5 (3):250-256.
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  27. Alex Rosenberg (2001). Careless Reading About the Human Genome Project. Biology and Philosophy 16 (2):281-284.
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  28. Alexander Rosenberg (1996). The Human Genome Project: Research Tactics and Economic Strategies. Social Philosophy and Policy 13 (02):1-.
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  29. Richard R. Sharp & J. Carl Barrett (1999). The Environmental Genome Project and Bioethics. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 9 (2):175-188.
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  30. Raymond Spier (1998). The Human Genome Project Under the Microscope. Science and Engineering Ethics 4 (2):131-134.
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  31. Marga Vicedo (1992). The Human Genome Project: Towards an Analysis of the Empirical, Ethical, and Conceptual Issues Involved. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 7 (3):255-278.
    In this paper I claim that the goal of mapping and sequencing the human genome is not wholly new, but rather is an extension of an older project to map genes, a central aim of genetics since its birth. Thus, the discussion about the value of the HGP should not be posed in global terms of acceptance or rejection, but in terms of how it should be developed. The first section of this paper presents a brief history of the project. (...)
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  32. Ramona Walls, Balaji Athreya, Laurel Cooper, Justin Elser, Maria A. Gandolfo, Pankaj Jaiswal, Christopher J. Mungall, Justin Preece, Stefan Rensing, Barry Smith & Dennis W. Stevenson (2012). Ontologies as Integrative Tools for Plant Science. American Journal of Botany 99 (8):1-13.
    Bio-ontologies are essential tools for accessing and analyzing the rapidly growing pool of plant genomic and phenomic data. Ontologies provide structured vocabularies to support consistent aggregation of data and a semantic framework for automated analyses and reasoning. They are a key component of the Semantic Web. This paper provides background on what bio-ontologies are, why they are relevant to botany, and the principles of ontology development. It includes an overview of ontologies and related resources that are relevant to plant science, (...)
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  33. David Wasserman (1999). Thomas H. Murray, Mark A. Rothstein, and Robert F. Murray, Ed., The Human Genome Project and the Future of Health Care:The Human Genome Project and the Future of Health Care. [REVIEW] Ethics 109 (4):911-914.
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  34. D. Weatherall (1992). Mapping the Code. The Human Genome Project and the Choices of Modern Science. Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (2):109-110.
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  35. David L. Wiesenthal & Neil I. Wiener (1996). Privacy and the Human Genome Project. Ethics and Behavior 6 (3):189 – 202.
    The Human Genome Project has raised many issues regarding the contributions of genetics to a variety of diseases and societal conditions. With genetic testing now easily conducted with lowered costs in nonmedical domains, a variety of privacy issues must be considered. Such testing will result in the loss of significant privacy rights for the individual. Society must now consider such issues as the ownership of genetic data, confidentiality rights to such information, limits placed on genetic screening, and legislation to control (...)
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  36. Adam S. Wilkins (1995). Variation in the Human Genome. Bioessays 17 (10):905-906.
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  37. Adam S. Wilkins (1993). The Human Genome: Dispelling the Fogg Travelling Around the Human Genome (1993). By Bektkand Jokdak. Les Editions Inserm and John Libbey Eurotext: Paris. IX+188pp. 210 Ff; $45. Isbn Inserm 2‐85598‐572‐2 and Isbn John Libbey Eurolext 2‐7420‐0030‐5. [REVIEW] Bioessays 15 (12):842-842.
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