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  1. David T. Beito (1987). Suburban Stateways. Critical Review 1 (2):42-50.
    CRABGRASS FRONTIER: THE SUBURBANIZATION OF THE UNITED STATES by Kenneth T. Jackson New York: Oxford University Press, 1985; 396 pp., $21.95.
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  2. Jason G. Bush (2009). Chacoan Road Systems as Products of Social Organization. Constellations 1 (1).
    The Chacoan road system is an understudied aspect of a very unique culture in New Mexico. The extensive roads present important evidence to the social structure of the Chaco people. A few theories have been presented about the reason for the roads, such as economic, administrative and religion. This paper argues that the roads were used for military purposes, because the roads provided quick access to all satellite townships in the region.
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  3. Chiara Certomà (2008). Authentic Place, Local Identities and Environmental Discourses. In R. C. Hillerbrand & R. Karlsson (eds.), Beyond the Global Village. Environmental Challenges inspiring Global Citizenship. The Interdisciplinary Press.
    This paper is intended to provide a critic perspective on the definition of places authenticity as proposed in the conventional environmental discourses. It suggests that, by following a very widespread view, modernity is con- sidered responsible for the loss of authenticity and the consequent disen- chantment of the world. However, environmental discourses claiming for the defence of places authenticity and adopting a rhetoric of nostalgia for a loss primeval relation between humans and nature are liable of some critics. In particular, (...)
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  4. Seamus Grimes & Jaime Nubiola (1997). Reconsidering the Exclusion of Metaphysics in Human Geography. Acta Philosophica 6 (2):265-276.
    From the time of Descartes a strong tendency emerged to exclude the consideration of metaphysical questions as a necessary step towards developing truly scientific disciplines. Within human geography, positivism had a significant influence in moulding the discipline as "spatial science", resulting in a reductionist vision of humanity. Since the 1970s, in reaction to the limitations of this narrow vision and also to the deterministic perspective of marxism, humanistic approaches became important, but have failed to adequately deal with the exclusion of (...)
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  5. David M. Mark, Andre Skupin & Barry Smith (2001). Features, Objects, and Other Things: Ontological Distinctions in the Geographic Domain. In Spatial Information Theory. Foundations of Geographic Information Science. Lecture Notes in Computer Science.
    Two hundred and sixty-three subjects each gave examples for one of five geographic categories: geographic features, geographic objects, geographic concepts, something geographic, and something that could be portrayed on a map. The frequencies of various responses were significantly different, indicating that the basic ontological terms feature, object, etc., are not interchangeable but carry different meanings when combined with adjectives indicating geographic or mappable. For all of the test phrases involving geographic, responses were predominantly natural features such as mountain, river, lake, (...)
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  6. P. S. Moharir (2003). Nonuniqueness in Geoscientific Inference. Research Studies Press.
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  7. Barry Smith (1997). The Cognitive Geometry of War. In Peter Koller & Klaus Puhl (eds.), Current Issues in Political Philosophy: Justice in Society and World Order. Hölder-Pichler-Tempsky.
    When national borders in the modern sense first began to be established in early modern Europe, non-contiguous and perforated nations were a commonplace. According to the conception of the shapes of nations that is currently preferred, however, nations must conform to the topological model of (approximate) circularity; their borders must guarantee contiguity and simple connectedness, and such borders must as far as possible conform to existing topographical features on the ground. The striving to conform to this model can be seen (...)
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