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  1. E. S. A. (1931). George Herbert Mead (1863-1931). The Monist 41 (3):471-471.
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  2. Mitchell Aboulafia, George Herbert Mead. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    George Herbert Mead (1863-1931), American philosopher and social theorist, is often classed with William James, Charles Sanders Peirce, and John Dewey as one of the most significant figures in classical American pragmatism. Dewey referred to Mead as “a seminal mind of the very first order” (Dewey, 1932, xl). Yet by the middle of the twentieth-century, Mead's prestige was greatest outside of professional philosophical circles. He is considered by many to be the father of the school of Symbolic Interactionism in sociology (...)
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  3. Mitchell Aboulafia (2006). Expressivism and Mead's Social Self. In John R. Shook & Joseph Margolis (eds.), A Companion to Pragmatism. Blackwell Pub..
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  4. Mitchell Aboulafia (2001). The Cosmopolitan Self: George Herbert Mead and Continental Philosophy. Illinois University Press.
    This important volume appreciably advances the dialogue between continental thought and classical American philosophy.
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  5. Mitchell Aboulafia (1993). Was George Herbert Mead a Feminist? Hypatia 8 (2):145 - 158.
    George Herbert Mead was a dedicated progressive and internationalist who strove to realize his political convictions through participation in numerous civic organizations in Chicago. These convictions informed and were informed by his approach to philosophy. This article addresses the bonds between Mead's philosophy, social psychology, and his support of women's rights through an analysis of a letter he wrote to his daughter-in-law regarding her plans for a career.
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  6. Mitchell Aboulafia (1986). Mead, Sartre: Self, Object, and Reflection. Philosophy and Social Criticism 11 (2):63-86.
    Sartre seeks both to overcome solipsism and clarify how the individual becomes an object—with a seemingly fixed char acter—through his account of The Look in Being and Nothingness. While his description of how The Look of the other transforms one into an object may at first appear to be confirmed by experience, the account proves to be inade quate as a refutation of solipsism and in showing exactly how one becomes an object. On the other hand, G.H. Mead has a (...)
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  7. George Allan (1974). George Herbert Mead. Process Studies 4 (1):42-51.
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  8. Meter Amevans (1956). Mead and Sartre on Man. Journal of Philosophy 53 (6):205-219.
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  9. Meter Amevans (1955). Mead and Husserl on the Self. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 15 (3):320-331.
  10. Grace Mead Andrus (1904). Professor Bawden's Functional Theory: A Rejoinder. Philosophical Review 13 (6):660-665.
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  11. Grace Mead Andrus (1904). Professor Bawden's Interpretation of the Physical and the Psychical. Philosophical Review 13 (4):429-444.
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  12. James Rowland Angell, A Mead Project Source Page.
    General Psychophysical Account of Re-presentation.-- In the last chapter we saw that even in those psychophysical processes where the sense organs were most obviously engaged, the effects of past experience were very conspicuous. This fact will suggest at once the probable difficulty of establishing any absolute line of demarcation between processes of perception and those which, in common untechnical. language, we call memory and imagination. We shall find as we go on that this difficulty is greater rather than less than (...)
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  13. Lonnie Athens (2007). Radical Interactionism: Going Beyond Mead. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 37 (2):137–165.
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  14. L. K. B. (1956). The Social Dynamics of George H. Mead. Review of Metaphysics 10 (2):366-366.
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  15. M. B. (1974). George Herbert Mead. Review of Metaphysics 28 (1):128-129.
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  16. Albert J. Bergesen (2004). Chomsky Versus Mead. Sociological Theory 22 (3):357-370.
    G. H. Mead's model of language and mind, while perhaps understandable at the time it was written, now seems inadequate. First, the research evidence strongly suggests that mental operations exist prior to language onset, conversation of gestures, or social interaction. Second, language is not just significant symbols; it requires syntax. Third, syntax seems to be part of our bioinheritance, that is, part of our presocial mind/brain-what Noam Chomsky has called our language faculty. Fourth, this means syntax probably is not learned (...)
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  17. Joseph Betz (1975). "The Philosophy of George Herbert Mead," Ed. Walter Robert Corti, with Preface by S. Morris Eames. Modern Schoolman 52 (3):312-316.
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  18. Gert J. J. Biesta (1999). Redefining the Subject, Redefining the Social, Reconsidering Education: George Herbert Mead's Course on Philosophy of Education at the University of Chicago. Educational Theory 49 (4):475-492.
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  19. Gert J. J. Biesta (1998). Mead, Intersubjectivity, and Education: The Early Writings. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 17 (2/3):73-99.
    This article seeks to reconstruct the early writings of George Herbert Mead in order to explore the significance of his work for the development of an intersubjective conception of education. The reconstruction takes its point of departure in Mead's claim that reflective consciousness has a social situation as its precondition. In a mainly chronological account of Mead's writings on psychology and philosophy from the period 1900–1925, it is shown how Mead explains the social origin of conscious reflection and self-consciousness. It (...)
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  20. Richard J. Blackwell (1976). "Four Pragmatists: A Critical Introduction to Peirce, James, Mead, and Dewey," by Israel Scheffler. Modern Schoolman 54 (1):96-96.
  21. John E. Boodin, A Mead Project Source Page.
    Our scientific concepts generally are in the melting-pot. They are all infected by relativity. This is as true in psychology and philosophy as in the physical sciences. In each case we must be willing to reconstruct our concepts on the basis of new evidence. Psychology has too long been hampered by a false tradition, and incidentally it has dragged philosophy with it into the slough of subjectivism. Brilliant discoveries in the realms of physiology and pathology throw new light on many (...)
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  22. Patrick L. Bourgeois (forthcoming). Role Taking, Corporeal Intersubjectivity, and Self: Mead and Merleau-Ponty. Philosophy Today:117-128.
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  23. Patrick L. Bourgeois & Sandra B. Rosenthal (1990). Scientific Time and the Temporal Sense of Human Existence: Merleau-Ponty and Mead. Research in Phenomenology 20 (1):152-163.
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  24. John Albin Broyer (1978). George Herbert Mead. Dialectics and Humanism 5 (4):27-32.
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  25. Richard Burke (1962). G. H. Mead and the Problem of Metaphysics. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 23 (1):81-88.
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  26. James Campbell (2009). Self, War, and Society: George Herbert Mead's Macrosociology. By Mary Jo Deegan. Metaphilosophy 40 (5):710-719.
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  27. James Campbell (1988). Hegel's Influence on George Herbert Mead. Southwest Philosophy Review 4 (2):1-6.
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  28. Gary A. Cook (2006). George H. Mead. In John R. Shook & Joseph Margolis (eds.), A Companion to Pragmatism. Blackwell Pub..
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  29. Walter Robert Corti (ed.) (1973). The Philosophy of George Herbert Mead. Amriswiler Bücherei.
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  30. Timothy M. Costelloe (1997). Contract or Coincidence: George Herbert Mead and Adam Smith on Self and Society. History of the Human Sciences 10 (2):81-109.
  31. George Cronk, George Herbert Mead. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  32. Grace A. de Laguna (1946). Communication, the Act, and the Object with Reference to Mead. Journal of Philosophy 43 (9):225-238.
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  33. Cornelis de Waal (2008). A Pragmatist World View : George Herbert Mead's Philosophy of the Act. In C. J. Misak (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of American Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  34. George Herbert Mead H. Heath Bawden Kevin S. Decker (2008). The Evolution of the Psychical Element, by George Herbert Mead (Dec. 1899–March 1900 or 1898–1899). Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (3):pp. 480-507.
  35. Kevin S. Decker (2008). The Evolution of the Psychical Element: George Herbert Mead at the University of Chicago: Lecture Notes by H. Heath Bawden 1899–1900: Introduction. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (3):pp. 469-479.
    George Herbert Mead's early lectures at the University of Chicago are more important to understanding the genesis of his views in social psychology than some commentators, such as Hans Joas, have emphasized. Mead's lecture series "The Evolution of the Psychical Element," preserved through the notes of student H. Heath Bawden, demonstrate his devotion to Hegelianism as a method of thinking and how this influenced his non-reductionistic approach to functional psychology. In addition, Mead's breadth of historical knowledge as well as his (...)
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  36. C. F. Delaney (1974). The Philosophy of George Herbert Mead. New Scholasticism 48 (4):539-542.
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  37. Lawrence J. Dennis & George W. Stickel (1981). Mead and Dewey: Thematic Connections on Educational Topics. Educational Theory 31 (3-4):319-331.
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  38. Jean-Philippe Deranty (2005). The Loss of Nature in Axel Honneth's Social Philosophy. Rereading Mead with Merleau-Ponty. Critical Horizons 6 (1):153-181.
    This paper analyses the model of interaction at the heart of Axel Honneth's social philosophy. It argues that interaction in his mature ethics of recognition has been reduced to intercourse between human persons and that the role of nature is now missing from it. The ethics of recognition takes into account neither the material dimensions of individual and social action, nor the normative meaning of non-human persons and natural environments. The loss of nature in the mature ethics of recognition is (...)
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  39. John Dewey (1931). George Herbert Mead. Journal of Philosophy 28 (12):309-314.
    This article contains John Dewey's remarks given at the funeral of G.H. Mead in Chicago in 1931.
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  40. Frank M. Doan (1974). The Philosophy of George Herbert Mead. Edited by Walter Robert Corti. Contributors: Van Meter Ames, David L. Miller, Herbert W. Schneider Et Al. Amriswilet Bucheri, 1973. Pp. 261. [REVIEW] Dialogue 13 (02):380-382.
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  41. Frank M. Doan (1958). Remarks on G. H. Mead's Conception of Simultaneity. Journal of Philosophy 55 (5):203-209.
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  42. Rickard J. Donovan (1974). George Herbert Mead. International Philosophical Quarterly 14 (1):131-133.
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  43. S. A. E. (1931). George Herbert Mead (1863-1931). The Monist 41 (3).
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  44. S. Morris Eames (1975). George Herbert Mead: Self, Language, and the World. By David L. Miller. Austin and London: University of Texas Press. 1973. Pp. Xxxviii, 280. $10. [REVIEW] Dialogue 14 (04):726-727.
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  45. Christian Etzrodt (2008). The Foundation of an Interpretative Sociology: A Critical Review of the Attempts of George H. Mead and Alfred Schutz. [REVIEW] Human Studies 31 (2):157 - 177.
    George H. Mead and Alfred Schutz proposed foundations for an interpretative sociology from opposite standpoints. Mead accepted the objective meaning structure a priori. His problem became therefore the explanation of the individuality and creativity of human actors in his social behavioristic approach. In contrast, Schutz started from the subjective consciousness of an isolated actor as a result of a phenomenological reduction. He was concerned with the problem of explaining the possibility of this isolated actor’s perceiving other actors in their existence, (...)
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  46. James E. Faulconer & R. Williams (eds.) (1990). Reconsidering Psychology. Duquesne University Press.
  47. Marilyn Fischer (2008). Mead and the International Mind. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 44 (3):pp. 508-531.
    In this paper I analyze the conceptions of internationalism and the international mind that Mead uses in "The Psychological Bases of Internationalism" (1915); in his 1917 Chicago Herald columns defending U.S. entry into the war; in Mind, Self, and Society (1934); and in "National Mindedness and International Mindedness" (1929). I show how the terms "internationalism" and "the international mind" arose within conversations among some Anglo-American thinkers. While Mead employs these terms in his own philosophical and sociological theorizing, he draws their (...)
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  48. Owen Flanagan (1988). Book Review:G. H. Mead: A Contemporary Re-Examination of His Thought. G. H. Mead, Hans Joas. [REVIEW] Ethics 99 (1):180-.
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  49. F. G. (1981). Marx and Mead. Review of Metaphysics 34 (4):788-789.
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  50. Saulius Geniusas (2006). Is the Self of Social Behaviorism Capable of Auto-Affection? Mead and Marion on the "I" and the "Me". Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 42 (2):242-265.
    : The purpose of this manuscript is to bring Mead's pragmatism into contact with Jean-Luc Marion's phenomenology. Taking as its focus the question of the I-pole of the self, the paper points to the absence and the need of a concept like auto-affection in Mead's analysis of selfhood. A pragmatic appropriation of this concept does not undermine the social framework of selfhood because the most rudimentary self-givenness is immediate and direct, yet simultaneously a posteriori. The social and biological genesis of (...)
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