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  1. Rolf Ahlers (ed.) (2004). System and Context: Early Romantic and Early Idealistic Constellations = System Und Kontext: Frühromantische Und Frühidealistische Konstellationen. Edwin Mellen Press.
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  2. Mike Barber (1999). Philip Blosser: Scheler's Critique of Kant's Ethics. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 32 (1):105-110.
  3. J. D. Bastable (1958). The Idealist Tradition. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 8:197-199.
  4. Ernst Behler (ed.) (1987). Philosophy of German Idealism. Continuum.
    The texts in this volume constitute highlights in the movement called transcendental idealism.
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  5. Alessandro Bertinetto (2012). Bild. Fichte Und der "Iconic Turn". Fichte-Studien 36:269-284.
  6. Alessandro Bertinetto (2009). Logik, Metaphysik, Wissenschaftslehre. Fichte-Studien 34:343-357.
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  7. Thom Brooks, On the Importance of the Phenomenology's Preface.
    I want to raise the question of why we should give the Preface this special treatment. What do we hope to learn from such an extended examination of the Preface that will help further the study of Hegel's work beyond its present state? My comments will be limited to a few central issues, such as the relationship between the Phenomenology and the system, the Phenomenology as an introduction to the system, and the Phenomenology as a ladder, in order to best (...)
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  8. G. Anthony Bruno (forthcoming). 'As From a State of Death': Schelling's Idealism as Mortalism. Comparative and Continental Philosophy.
    If we understand a philosophical problem as “the collision between a comprehensive view (be it hypothesis or belief) and a particular fact which will not fit into it” (Jonas 2001, 9), we should expect no greater problem for Spinozism and German idealism than the human corpse. That the living die is a problem for a view on which it is a “figment of the human imagination” that the organic and inorganic differ in kind, on which death introduces no qualitative change (...)
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  9. G. Anthony Bruno (2014). Freedom and Pluralism in Schelling’s Critique of Fichte’s Jena “Wissenschaftslehre”. Idealistic Studies 43 (1/2):71-86.
    Our understanding of Schelling’s internal critique of German idealism, including his late attack on Hegel, is incomplete unless we trace it to the early “Philosophical Letters on Dogmatism and Criticism,” which initiate his engagement with the problem of systematicity—that judgment makes deriving a system of a priori conditions from a first principle necessary, while this capacity’s finitude makes this impossible. Schelling aims to demonstrate this problem’s intractability. My conceptual aim is to reconstruct this from the “Letters,” which reject Fichte’s claim (...)
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  10. G. Anthony Bruno (2013). Freedom and Pluralism in Schelling’s Critique of Fichte’s Jena “Wissenschaftslehre”. Idealistic Studies 43 (1):71-86.
    Schelling tends to be either over-assimilated or under-assimilated with the highest ambitions of German idealism. A prominent reading sees him as an absolute idealist who successfully systematizes philosophy. An equally prominent reading sees his chief contribution as a skeptical attack on Hegelian systematicity. Both readings are incomplete: Schelling is neither simply a systematizer nor an anti-systematizer. On the one hand, he contributes to the idealist project from its inception, inspiring both Fichte’s identification of critique with doctrine and Hegel’s speculative reconception (...)
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  11. G. Anthony Bruno (2013). The Appearance and Disappearance of Intellectual Intuition in Schelling’s Philosophy. Analecta Hermeneutica 5.
    Schelling scholars face an uphill battle. His confinement to the smallest circles of ‘continental’ thought puts him at the margins of what today counts as philosophy. His eclipse by Fichte and Hegel and inheritance by better-read thinkers like Kierkegaard and Heidegger tend to reduce him to a historical footnote. And the sometimes obscure formulations he uses makes the otherwise difficult writings of fellow post-Kantians seem comparatively more accessible. For those seeking to widen these circles, see through this eclipse and elucidate (...)
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  12. G. Anthony Bruno (2011). Philosophy's Collision with the Corpse. Juventas Zeitschrift für Junge Philosophie 1 (1).
    If we accept the Socratic edict that the examined life is the only worth living, we find no examination can exclude that mortal fate of human life. If we define a philosophical problem as, in Hans Jonas’ words, “the collision between a comprehensive view (be it hypothesis or belief) and a particular fact which will not fit into it”, we see there can be no greater problem for materialism or organicism than the corpse. That living things die is a problem (...)
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  13. P. D. Bubbio & P. Redding (eds.) (2012). Religion After Kant: God and Culture in the Idealist Era. Cambridge Scholars Press.
  14. Victoria I. Burke (2013). The Substance of Ethical Recognition: Hegel's Antigone and the Irreplaceability of the Brother. New German Critique 118.
    G.W.F. Hegel focuses his treatment of Sophocles' drama, Antigone , in the Phenomenology of Spirit, on the ideal of mutual recognition. Antigone was punished with death for performing the burial ritual honoring her brother, Polyneices, to whose irreplaceability she attests in her well-known speech of defiance. Hegel argues that Antigone's loss of Polyneices was the irreparable loss of reciprocal recognition. Only in the brother sister relation, Hegel thought, could there be equality in mutual recognition. I argue that this equality cannot (...)
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  15. Victoria I. Burke (2011). Hegel and the Normativity of the Concept. Idealistic Studies 1 (3):161-166.
    A lexical unit of meaning, or the concept, involves not just two moments, the rule and the following of the rule, but two reciprocally dependent moments. I argue that this links meaning to value. As a reciprocal relation, truth as normative is constituted by what Hegel calls ethical substance, which exists only between more than one consciousness, or, as Hegel would say, moments of consciousness. I read these two moments as the two shapes of consciousness that Hegel calls the master (...)
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  16. Victoria I. Burke (2008). From Ethical Substance to Reflection: Hegel’s Antigone. Mosaic: A Journal for the Interdisciplinary Study of Literature 41 (3).
    Hegel’s treatment of Sophocles’s Antigone exposes a tension in our own landscape between religious and civil autonomy. This tension reflects a deeper tension between unreflective, implicit norms and reflective, explicit norms that can be autonomously endorsed. The tension is, as Hegel recognizes, of particular importance to women. Hegel’s characterization of this tension in light of Antigone is, as H.S. Harris argues, both a more developed and a more fundamental moment in the Phenomenology of Spirit than the moment of Enlightenment autonomy (...)
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  17. Victoria I. Burke (2005). Hegel's Concept of Mutual Recognition: The Limits of Self-Determination. Philosophical Forum 36 (2):213-220.
    For Hegel, the ideal relation that two self-conscious beings might have to each other is one of reciprocal mutual recognition. According to Hegel, “a self-consciousness exists for [another] consciousness.” That is, self-consciousness is defined by its being recognized as self-conscious by another self-consciousness. In one formulation, Robert Pippin says that this means that “being a free agent consists in being recognized as one.” However, at the same time, Hegel values self-determination, which suggests a fundamental independence from others. The formative activity (...)
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  18. Tony Cheng (2008). World and Subject: Themes From McDowell. Dissertation, National Chengchi University, Taiwan
    This essay is an inquiry into John McDowell’s thinking on ‘subjectivity.’ The project consists in two parts. On the one hand, I will discuss how McDowell understands and responds to the various issues he is tackling; on the other, I will approach relevant issues concerning subjectivity by considering different aspects of it: a subject as a perceiver, knower, thinker, speaker, agent, person and (self-) conscious being in the world. The inquiry begins by identifying and resolving a tension generated by the (...)
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  19. Rebecca Comay (2010). Mourning Sickness: Hegel and the French Revolution. Stanford University Press.
    This book explores Hegel's response to the French Revolutionary Terror and its impact on Germany.
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  20. Rebecca Comay (2008). Missed Revolutions: Translation, Transmission, Trauma. Idealistic Studies 38 (1/2):23-40.
    This essay explores the familiar German ideology according to which a revolution in thought would, in varying proportions, precede, succeed, accommodate,and generally upstage a political revolution whose defining feature was increasingly thought to be its founding violence: the slide from 1789 to 1793. Germany thus sets out to quarantine the political threat of revolution while siphoning off and absorbing the revolution’s intensity and energy for thinking as such. The essay holds that this structure corresponds to the psychoanalytic logic of trauma: (...)
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  21. Evelyn G. Petersen de Barros (2011). A Música Em Schelling E O Ritmo Universal Do Absoluto: Music And The Universal Rhythm Of Absolute In Schelling’s Work. Griot 4 (2):44-59.
    O presente artigo visa problematizar a concepção de música proposta pelo filósofo Friedrich Schelling em sua obra ‘Filosofia da Arte’, na qual essa forma artística é concebida enquanto uma potência real do Absoluto. Desse modo, pretende-se apontar para o caráter inovador e peculiar da concepção schelliniana em contraste com a noção romântica de música absoluta, assim como situá-la dentro do panorama geral do sistema de identidades desenvolvido pelo autor. -/- This article aims to discuss the musical conception proposed by German (...)
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  22. William Desmond, Ernst-Otto Jan Onnasch & Paul Cruysberghs (eds.) (2004). Philosophy and Religion in German Idealism. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    This volume comprises studies written by prominent scholars working in the field of German Idealism. These scholars come from the English speaking philosophical world and Continental Europe. They treat major aspects of the place of religion in Idealism, Romanticism and other schools of thought and culture. They also discuss the tensions and relations between religion and philosophy in terms of the specific form they take in German Idealism, and in terms of the effect they still have on contemporary culture. The (...)
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  23. Hector Ferreiro (2012). La Teoría Hegeliana de la Imaginación. Estudios Hegelianos 1:16-29.
    In the process of knowledge imagination is, according to Hegel, the point where the human mind dissociates the object into two different contents - i.e. the thing of the external world and the internal content of the mind -, so that both versions of the object must corroborate each other in the way of a synthesis of heterogenous elements that only in their collation recognizes their identity. Comprehension sublates this dualism, and, by doing that, it sublates also the empiricist approach (...)
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  24. Michael Forster & Kristin Gjesdal (eds.) (2015). Oxford Handbook of German Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century. Oxford University Press.
    This volume constitutes the first collective critical study of German philosophy in the nineteenth century. A team of leading experts explore the influential figures associated with the period--including Hegel, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Frege--and provide fresh accounts of the philosophical movements and key debates with which they engaged.
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  25. Paul Giladi (2015). Pragmatist Themes in Van Fraassen’s Stances and Hegel’s Forms of Consciousness. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 24 (1):95-111.
    The aim of this paper is to establish a substantial positive philosophical connection between Bas van Fraassen and Hegel, by focusing on their respective notions of ‘stance’ and ‘form of consciousness’. In Section I, I run through five ways of understanding van Fraassen’s idea of a stance. I argue that a ‘stance’ is best understood as an intellectual disposition. This, in turn, means that the criteria for assessing a stance are ones which ask whether or not a stance adequately makes (...)
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  26. Benedikt Paul Göcke & Margit Wasmaier-Sailer (eds.) (2011). Idealismus Und Natürliche Theologie. Verlag Karl Alber.
    Insofern die Frage nach Gott die Mitte der Religion ist, ist die philosophische Reflexion der Rede von Gott wesentlich für das Selbstverständnis von Religion. Die natürliche Theologie als philosophisches Nachdenken über Gott nimmt somit da, wo es um Religion geht, eine zentrale Stellung ein. Dieser Sammelband fragt nach der Tragfähigkeit und Relevanz des Deutschen Idealismus für die gegenwärtige natürliche Theologie. Die Beiträge zeigen, inwieweit sich aus den Systemen Kants und der Idealisten Kriterien für eine Rede von Gott gewinnen lassen, die (...)
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  27. Benedikt Paul Göcke & Margit Wasmaier-Sailer (eds.) (2011). Idealismus Und Natürliche Theologie. Verlag Karl Alber.
    Insofern die Frage nach Gott die Mitte der Religion ist, ist die philosophische Reflexion der Rede von Gott wesentlich für das Selbstverständnis von Religion. Die natürliche Theologie als philosophisches Nachdenken über Gott nimmt somit da, wo es um Religion geht, eine zentrale Stellung ein. Dieser Sammelband fragt nach der Tragfähigkeit und Relevanz des Deutschen Idealismus für die gegenwärtige natürliche Theologie. Die Beiträge zeigen, inwieweit sich aus den Systemen Kants und der Idealisten Kriterien für eine Rede von Gott gewinnen lassen, die (...)
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  28. Peter E. Gordon (2005). German Idealism: The Struggle Against Subjectivism, 1781–1801 by Freerick C. Beiser and German Philosophy, 1760–1860: The Legacy of Idealism by Terry Pinkard. [REVIEW] History and Theory 44 (1):121–137.
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  29. Johannes Haag (ed.) (forthcoming). Übergänge - diskursiv oder intuitiv? Essays zu Eckart Förster die 25 Jahre der Philosophie. Klostermann.
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  30. Johannes Haag (2010). Fichte on the Consciousness of Spinoza's God. In Eckart Förster & Yitzhak Melamed (eds.), Spinoza and German Idealism. CUP 100-120.
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  31. Ignace Haaz (2006). Nietzsche et la métaphore cognitive. Dissertation, Geneva (Switzerland)
    F. Nietzsche does interesting indications on the anthropological foundation of language in his lessons on classical rhetoric, at the University of Basel in 1874. Many quotations of Gerber and Humboldt, and older notions, drawn from the Aristotle's Rhetoric are discussed in this dissertation. Many studies highlighted Nietzsche's attempts during thirty years (1976-2006) to draw a consistent anthropological foundation of the language. Some of them shed light on the metaphor, described from the point of view of anthropology, as an innovative perspective (...)
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  32. Fritz Karsch (1925). Christoph Gottfried Bardilis Logischer Realismus. Kant-Studien 30 (1-2):437-452.
  33. Chad Kautzer (2013). Kant, Perpetual Peace, and the Colonial Origins of Modern Subjectivity. peace studies journal 6 (2):58-67.
    There has been a persistent misunderstanding of the nature of cosmopolitanism in Immanuel Kant’s 1795 essay “Perpetual Peace,” viewing it as a qualitative break from the bellicose natural law tradition preceding it. This misunderstanding is in part due to Kant’s explicitly critical comments about colonialism as well as his attempt to rhetorically distance his cosmopolitanism from traditional natural law theory. In this paper, I argue that the necessary foundation for Kant’s cosmopolitan subjectivity and right was forged in the experience (...)
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  34. Poul Kjaer (2006). Systems in Context: On the Outcome of the Habermas/Luhmann Debate. Ancilla Iuris 1:66-77.
    Usually regarded as a 1970s phenomenon, this article demonstrates that the debate between Jürgen Habermas and Niklas Luhmann continued until Luhmann’s death in 1998, and that the development of the two theorists’ positions during the 1980s and 1990s was characterised by convergence rather than by divergence. In the realm of legal theory, the article suggests, convergence advanced to the extent that Habermas’ discourse theory may be characterised as a normative superstructure to Luhmann’s descriptive theory of society. It is further shown (...)
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  35. Nikolas Kompridis (ed.) (2006). Philosophical Romanticism. Routledge.
    Philosophical Romanticism is one of the first books to address the relationship between philosophy and romanticism, an area which is currently undergoing a major revival. This collection of specially-written articles by world-class philosophers explores the contribution of romantic thought to topics such as freedom, autonomy and subjectivity; memory and imagination; pluralism and practical reason; modernism, scepticism and irony; art and ethics; and cosmology, time and technology. While the roots of romanticism are to be found in early German idealism, Philosophical Romanticism (...)
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  36. Susanna Lindberg (2011). On the Night of the Elemental Imaginary. Research in Phenomenology 41 (2):157-180.
    This essay is a comparison between Schelling's and Blanchot's conceptions of the night of the imaginary. Schelling is the most romantic of the German idealist philosophers and Blanchot the most extreme of the French “deconstructionists.“ Their historical link is actually indirect, but they offer two complementary views on the “same“ impersonal nocturnal experience of the imaginary, the approach of which requires a certain self-overcoming of philosophy towards literature.
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  37. María Del Rosario Acosta López (2009). Review Article. Research in Phenomenology 39 (1):152-163.
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  38. Domenic Marbaniang (2013). The Vocation of the Christian Scholar: A Fichtean Analysis. NATA Journal 3 (1).
    Johann Fichte gave a lecture on The Vocation of the Scholar. The article explores its applicability for the Vocation of the Christian Scholar.
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  39. Jennifer Marra (2015). Humor as a Symbolic Form: Cassirer and the Culture of Comedy. In Sebastian Luft & J. Tyler Friedman (eds.), The Philosophy of Ernst Cassirer: A Novel Assessment. De Gruyter 419-434.
  40. Dalia Nassar (2015). Sensibility and Organic Unity: Kant, Goethe, and the Plasticity of Cognition. Intellectual History Review 25 (3):311-326.
    In this paper, I trace a ‘leading thread’ from Kant’s Critique of Judgment to Goethe that involves a shift from a conceptual framework, in which a priori concepts furnish necessity and thereby science, to a framework in which sensible experience plays a far more significant and determining role in the formation of knowledge. Although this shift was not enacted by Kant himself, his elaboration of organic unity or organisms paved the way for this transformation. By considering both the methodological difficulties (...)
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  41. Dalia Nassar (2014). Romantic Empiricism After the ‘End of Nature’: Contributions to Environmental Philosophy. In The Relevance of Romanticism: Essays on German Romantic Philosophy. Oxford University Press
    Over the last two decades, environmental theorists have repeatedly pronounced the “end” of nature, arguing that the idea of nature is neither plausible nor desirable. This chapter offers an environmental reappraisal of romanticism, in light of these critiques. Its goals are historical and systematic. First, the chapter assesses the validity of the environmentalist critique of the romantic conception of nature by distinguishing different strands within romanticism, and locating an empiricist strand in the natural-scientific work of Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. Second, (...)
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  42. Dalia Nassar (ed.) (2014). The Relevance of Romanticism: Essays on German Romantic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
    Since the early 1990s, there has been a resurgence of interest in philosophy between “Kant and Hegel,” and in early German romanticism in particular. Philosophers have come to recognize that, in spite of significant differences between the contemporary and romantic contexts, romanticism continues to “persist,” and the questions which the Romantics raised remain relevant today. The Relevance of Romanticism: Essays on Early German Romantic Philosophy is the first collection of essays that offers an in-depth analysis of the reasons why philosophers (...)
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  43. Dalia Nassar (2013). The Romantic Absolute: Being and Knowing in Early German Romantic Philosophy, 1795-1804. University of Chicago Press.
    The absolute was one of the most significant philosophical concepts in the early nineteenth century, particularly for the German romantics. Its exact meaning and its role within philosophical romanticism remain, however, a highly contested topic among contemporary scholars. In The Romantic Absolute, I offer a new assessment of the romantics and their understanding of the absolute, filling an important gap in the history of philosophy, especially with respect to the crucial period between Kant and Hegel.
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  44. Dalia Nassar (2013). Intellectual Intuition and the Philosophy of Nature: An Examination of the Problem. In Johannes Haag & Markus Wild (eds.), Übergänge - diskrusiv oder intuitiv. Essays zu Eckart Försters Die 25 Jahre der Philosophie. Klostermann
    This paper considers one of the most controversial aspects of Friedrich Schelling’s philosophy, his notion of intellectual intuition and its place within his philosophy of nature. I argue that Schelling developed his account of intellectual intuition through an encounter with--and ultimate critique of--Spinoza’s third kind of knowledge. Thus, Schelling’s notion of intuition was not an appropriation of Fichte’s conception of intuition as an act of consciousness. Nonetheless, and in spite of his sympathy with Spinoza, Schelling contended that intellectual intuition must (...)
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  45. Dalia Nassar (2011). Idealism is Nothing but Genuine Empiricism: Novalis, Goethe and the Ideal of Romantic Science. Goethe Yearbook 18 (1).
    This article appeared in a special issue of the Goethe Yearbook, on Goethe and German Idealism. In it, I consider Novalis' unparalleled admiration for Goethe's scientific writings in contrast to his rather lukewarm reception of Goethe's poetry. I argue that Novalis' ideal of a “romantic encyclopedia” in which all the arts and sciences are understood in their relations to one another (as opposed to in isolation, like Diderot and D'Alemberts' project) is inspired by Goethe's practice as a scientist. I develop (...)
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  46. Dalia Nassar (2010). From a Philosophy of Self to a Philosophy of Nature: Goethe and the Development of Schelling's Naturphilosophie. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 92 (3):304-321.
    One of the most significant moments in the development of German idealism is Schelling's break from his mentor Fichte. On account of its significance, there have been numerous studies examining the origin and meaning of this transition in Schelling's thought. Not one study, however, considers Goethe's influence on Schelling's development. This is surprising given the fact that in the fall of 1799 Goethe and Schelling meet every day for a week, to go through and edit what came to be Schelling's (...)
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  47. Brian O'Connor (2009). Introduction: German Idealism and Normativity. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 17 (1):3 – 7.
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  48. Brian O'Connor (2006). Review of Paul W. Franks, All or Nothing: Systematicity, Transcendental Arguments, and Skepticism in German Idealism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2006 (3).
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  49. Marcus Ohlström, Marco Solinas & Olivier Voirol (2010). Redistribuzione o riconoscimento? di Nancy Fraser e Axel Honneth. Iride 23 (2):443-460.
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  50. Lydia Patton (2015). Methodology of the Sciences. In Michael Forster & Kristin Gjesdal (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of German Philosophy in the Nineteenth Century. Oxford University Press 594-606.
    In the growing Prussian university system of the early nineteenth century, "Wissenschaft" (science) was seen as an endeavor common to university faculties, characterized by a rigorous methodology. On this view, history and jurisprudence are sciences, as much as is physics. Nineteenth century trends challenged this view: the increasing influence of materialist and positivist philosophies, profound changes in the relationships between university faculties, and the defense of Kant's classification of the sciences by neo-Kantians. Wilhelm Dilthey's defense of the independence of the (...)
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