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  1. Susan Ariel Aaronson (2005). “Minding Our Business”: What the United States Government has Done and Can Do to Ensure That U.S. Multinationals Act Responsibly in Foreign Markets. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):175 - 198.
    The United States Government does not mandate that US based firms follow US social and environmental law in foreign markets. However, because many developing countries do not have strong human rights, labor, and environmental laws, many multinationals have adopted voluntary corporate responsibility initiatives to self-regulate their overseas social and environmental practices. This article argues that voluntary actions, while important, are insufficient to address the magnitude of problems companies confront as they operate in developing countries where governance is often inadequate. The (...)
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  2. Arun Agrawal (2010). Environment, Community, Government. In Ilana Feldman & Miriam Iris Ticktin (eds.), In the Name of Humanity: The Government of Threat and Care. Duke University Press.
  3. L. Alexander (2003). Is Judicial Review Democratic? A Comment on Harel. Law and Philosophy 22 (s 3-4):277-283.
  4. Andrew Arato (2000). The New Democracies and American Constitutional Design. Constellations 7 (3):316-340.
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  5. Richard Baron (2006). Ethics in Government. Philosophy Now 54:34-37.
    This article considers the application of utilitarian and deontological theories to questions that arise in the conduct of government, including whether a government may mislead the public without actually lying, how far civil servants should maintain political neutrality, whether civil servants should leak information to the press, and whether a government should avoid getting legal advice that it might not like.
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  6. Rory J. Conces (2008). All in Not Normal in Kosovo. The Serbia Observer (December 10):2.
  7. Rebecca Dresser (2002). Beyond Government Intervention: Drug Companies and Bioethics. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (3):42 – 43.
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  8. Karl Fielding (1980). Nonexcludability and Government Financing of Public Goods. Journal of Libertarian Studies 3 (3):293-98.
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  9. Ross Harrison (2000). Government is Good for You. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 100 (2):159–173.
    There is an argument that government cannot be good for individuals because it causes them to act through fear of punishment, hence for nonmoral reasons. The obvious responses of accepting the conclusion (anarchism) and denying the premiss about moral motivation (utilitarianism) are first considered. Then the strategy of accepting the premiss but denying the conclusion is pursued at greater length. Some arguments of T. H. Green and B. Bosanquet which attempt to do this are considered before an independent resolution is (...)
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  10. Nicholas Maxwell, Text of TEDxUCL Talk: The Urgent Need for an Academic Revolution.
    We urgently need to bring about a revolution in academic inquiry so that the basic aim becomes, not just knowledge, but rather wisdom, construed to be the capacity and active endeavour to realize what is of value in life for oneself and others, wisdom thus including knowledge and technological know-how, but much else besides. A basic task of academia ought to be to help humanity learn how to make progress towards as good a world as possible.
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  11. Avrum Stroll (1967). Censorship, Models and Self-Government. Journal of Value Inquiry 1 (2):81-95.
  12. Paul Thompson (2007). Theorizing Technological and Institutional Change. Techné 11 (1):19-31.
    Formal, informal and material institutions constitute the framework for human interaction and communicative practice. Three ideas from institutional theory are particularly relevant to technical change. Exclusion cost refers to the effort that must be expended to prevent others from usurping or interfering in one’s use or disposal of a given good or resource. Alienability refers to the ability to tangibly extricate a good or resource from one setting, making it available for exchange relations. Rivalry refers to the degree and character (...)
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  13. Roger Wertheimer (1975). Are the Police Necessary? In E. Viano & J. Reiman (eds.), The Police in Society. D.C. Heath.