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  1. Lynne M. Andersson, Robert A. Giacalone & Carole L. Jurkiewicz (2007). On the Relationship of Hope and Gratitude to Corporate Social Responsibility. Journal of Business Ethics 70 (4):401 - 409.
    A longitudinal study of 308 white-collar U.S. employees revealed that feelings of hope and gratitude increase concern for corporate social responsibility (CSR). In particular, employees with stronger hope and gratitude were found to have a greater sense of responsibility toward employee and societal issues; interestingly, employee hope and gratitude did not affect sense of responsibility toward economic and safety/quality issues. These findings offer an extension of research by Giacalone, Paul, and Jurkiewicz (2005, Journal of Business Ethics, 58, 295-305).
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  2. Fred R. Berger (1975). Gratitude. Ethics 85 (4):298-309.
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  3. Samuel V. Bruton (2003). Duties of Gratitude. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 10 (1):11-15.
    This paper is a response to a recent article by Christopher Wellman in which Wellman argues that gratitude is better understood as a virtue rather than a source of moral obligations. First, I offer several examples intended to dispute his claim that gratitude does not impose duties. Second, I provide my own reasons for thinking that deontic notions alone cannot capture the moral significance of gratitude. Wellman’s mistake is attributable to an overly narrow conception of duty that his argument presupposes. (...)
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  4. Norman S. Care (1995). Book Review:Gratitude. Terrance McConnell. [REVIEW] Ethics 105 (3):657-.
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  5. Ellen Wright Clayton (2000). A Time for Gratitude. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 28 (4):329-329.
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  6. John Davenport (2010). Accidental Devotion and Gratitude : Kierkegaard in My Life-Story. In Robert L. Perkins, Marc Alan Jolley & Edmon L. Rowell (eds.), Why Kierkegaard Matters: A Festschrift in Honor of Robert L. Perkins. Mercer University Press.
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  7. Ron Epstein, Remembrance and Gratitude.
    After having been invited to the United States by some disciples from Hong Kong, the Master established a Buddhist Lecture Hall in San Francisco's Chinatown in 1962. In 1963, because some of the disciples there were not respectful of the Dharma, he left Chinatown and moved the Buddhist Lecture Hall to a first-floor flat in a run-down Victorian building on the edge of San Francisco's Fillmore District and Japantown. The other floors of the building contained individual rooms for rent with (...)
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  8. Patrick Fitzgerald (1998). Gratitude and Justice. Ethics 109 (1):119-153.
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  9. Rona M. Gerber (1990). Gratitude and the Duties of Grown Children Towards Their Aging Parents. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 5 (1):29-34.
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  10. George Klosko (1989). Political Obligation and Gratitude. Philosophy and Public Affairs 18 (4):352-358.
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  11. Dudley Knowles (2002). Gratitude and Good Government. Res Publica 8 (1):1-20.
    I attempt to show that it is notphilosophically incompetent to ground politicalobligation in feelings of gratitude. But theargument needs to be stated carefully.Gratitude must be distinguished fromreciprocity. It applies only to good governmentwhich provides benefits to citizens for whichthey ought to feel grateful. It applies only tocitizens who accept that their feelings ofgratitude are properly demonstrated by anacceptance on their part of the duties ofcitizenship. It does not apply to citizenswhose benefits are purchased at the expense ofthe unjust treatment of (...)
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  12. Adam Leite, For Jim Pryor, with Gratitude, in Order to Find Out Exactly Where We Disagree.
    “Moorean Dogmatist” responses to external world skepticism endorse courses of reasoning that many people find objectionable. This paper seeks to locate this dissatisfaction in considerations about epistemic responsibility. I sketch a theory of immediate warrant and show how it can be combined with plausible “inferential internalist” demands arising from considerations of epistemic responsibility. The resulting view endorses immediate perceptual warrant but forbids the sort of reasoning that “Moorean Dogmatism” would allow. A surprising result is that Dogmatism’s commitment to immediate epistemic (...)
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  13. Scott C. Lowe (1992). Institutions and Debts of Gratitude. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 7 (2):57-62.
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  14. Mike W. Martin (1999). Good Fortune Obligates: Gratitude, Philanthropy, and Colonialism. Southern Journal of Philosophy 37 (1):57-75.
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  15. Brian Medlin (1964). The Theory of Truth-Functions. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 42 (1):1 – 21.
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  16. Theodore Mischel (1961). Collingwood on Art as “Imaginative Expression”. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 39 (3):241-250.
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  17. John T. Richardson (1954). The Virtue of Gratitude According to the Mind of Saint Thomas. Washington.
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  18. Richard Rorty (1994). Taylor on Self-Celebration and Gratitude. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 54 (1):197-201.
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  19. Frederick Siegler (1967). Hart on Rules of Obligation. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 45 (3):341-355.
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  20. Saul Smilansky (2004). Gratitude, Contribution, and Ethical Theory. In Jonathan Seglow (ed.), The Ethics of Altruism. F. Cass Publishers. 34-48.
    I attempt to sketch in general terms an alternative moral perspective that goes beyond the traditional normative theories, a moral perspective called ?contributivism?. This focuses on contribution: caring about one's contribution, I claim, lies at the centre of moral cncern. First I illustrate the need for a contribution-focussed moral theory, primarily by considering gratitude, the typical required response to altruism. Second, I point out some of the motivational resources of such a contribution-based view. I conclude by showing how focusing on (...)
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  21. Charles Stewart-Robertson (1990). The Rhythms of Gratitude: Historical Developments and Philosophical Concerns. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 68 (2):189 – 205.
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  22. A. D. M. Walker (1989). Obligations of Gratitude and Political Obligation. Philosophy and Public Affairs 18 (4):359-364.
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  23. A. D. M. Walker (1988). Political Obligation and the Argument From Gratitude. Philosophy and Public Affairs 17 (3):191-211.
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  24. Roslyn Weiss (1985). The Moral and Social Dimensions of Gratitude. Southern Journal of Philosophy 23 (4):491-501.
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  25. Christopher Heath Wellman (1999). Gratitude as a Virtue. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 80 (3):284–300.
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  26. Michael Wenisch (2010). The Convergence of Truthfulness and Gratitude in Scheler's and von Hildebrand's Accounts of Humility. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (1):85-98.
    This article makes use of the thinking of both Max Scheler and Dietrich von Hildebrand in attempting properly to understand the nature of humility. The article examines how gratitude and truthfulness are both present, in an essentially integrated fashion, when a person exists in a humble state. Also addressed is the converse proposition, namely, that gratitude and truthfulness are absent in theperson who exists in a proud state and are replaced in that person by their respective opposites, ingratitude and mendacity. (...)
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  27. Patricia White (1999). Gratitude, Citizenship and Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 18 (1):43-52.
    Citizenship education is a complex matter, and not least the place of civic virtues in it. This is illustrated by a consideration of the civic virtue of gratitude. Two conceptions of gratitude are explored. Gratitude seen as a debt is examined and Kant’s exposition of it, including his objections to a person’s getting himself into the position where he has to show gratitude as a beneficiary, is explored. An alternative conception of gratitude as recognition is developed. This, it is claimed, (...)
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  28. R. Ziedins (1966). Knowledge, Belief and Perceptual Experiences. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 44 (1):70-88.
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