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  1. Halina Ablamowicz (1992). Shame as an Interpersonal Dimension of Communication Among Doctoral Students: An Empirical Phenomenological Study. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 23 (1):30-49.
    Current conceptions of shame emphasize its negative communication value as a phenomenon of conscious experience. A tendency in our contemporary society is to view this phenomenon as an extremely disparaging and undesirable experience that every person should avoid or eliminate. It has become a cultural norm now that shame, perceived as human failure or sickness, is to be rejected, hidden, and not discussed. It is believed to stand in the way of personal progress and self-realization. The research literature mirrors not (...)
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  2. Virgil C. Aldrich (1939). An Ethics of Shame. Ethics 50 (1):57-77.
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  3. Elena Alessiato (2012). Karl Jaspers E la Politica: Dalle Origini Alla Questione Della Colpa. Orthotes.
    Non sempre il pensiero politico di Karl Jaspers ha ricevuto l’attenzione che merita.
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  4. Judith André (2005). Review Essay/Disgust, Dignity, and a Public Intellectual. Criminal Justice Ethics 24 (1):52-57.
    Martha C. Nussbaum, Hiding from Humanity: Disgust, Shame, and the Law. Princeton Nf: Princeton University Press, 2004, xv #;pl 413 pp.
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  5. Judith Andre (2002). Moral Distress in Healthcare. Bioethics Forum 18 (1-2):44-46.
    Moral distress is the sense that one must do, or cooperate in, what is wrong. It is paradigmatically faced by nurses, but it is almost a universal occupational hazard.
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  6. Richard Arneson (2007). Shame, Stigma, and Disgust in the Decent Society. Journal of Ethics 11 (1):31 - 63.
    Would a just society or government absolutely refrain from shaming or humiliating any of its members? "No," says this essay. It describes morally acceptable uses of shame, stigma and disgust as tools of social control in a decent (just) society. These uses involve criminal law, tort law, and informal social norms. The standard of moral acceptability proposed for determining the line is a version of perfectionistic prioritarian consequenstialism. From this standpoint, criticism is developed against Martha Nussbaum's view that to respect (...)
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  7. Alison Bailey (2011). On White Shame and Vulnerabiltiy. South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (3):472-483.
    In this paper I address a tension in Samantha Vice’s claim that humility and silence offer effective moral responses to white shame in the wake of South African apartheid. Vice describes these twin virtues using inward-turning language of moral self-repair, but she also acknowledges that this ‘personal, inward directed project’ has relational dimensions. Her failure to explore the relational strand, however, leaves her description of white shame sounding solitary and penitent. -/- My response develops the missing relational dimensions of white (...)
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  8. Zenon Ba|[Ntilde]|Kowski (2006). Hiding From Humanity: Disgust, Shame and the Law. Contemporary Political Theory 5 (2):226.
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  9. Sharon Bishop (1987). Connections and Guilt. Hypatia 2 (1):7 - 23.
    Moral philosphy, in both the Kantian and Utilitarian traditions, has it as an ideal to provide a set of principles which dominate all other considerations and which will consistently resolve all moral problems. This is often taken to imply that guilt or remorse is irrational if it occurs in circumstances in which one does ones duty but also harms others. This essay explores the possibility of giving up this ideal in favor of a more complex view of morality in which (...)
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  10. Susan Livingston Boone (1998). The Appearance of Shame in Holocaust Witness. Dissertation, Syracuse University
    The dissertation maintains the need for a more extended consideration of shame in Western "self" understandings and models of subjectivity. It joins its voice with other critics challenging the totalized individuality, the certainty and unambiguous righteousness of the Western moral self of modernity, along with its attendant conception of personal moral responsibility. ;The argument is made that testimonial literature provides a compelling point of view from which to consider models of the Western self. Testimony provides a perspective which brings to (...)
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  11. Thom Brooks (2008). Shame on You, Shame on Me? Nussbaum on Shame Punishment. Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (4):322-334.
    abstract Shame punishments have become an increasingly popular alternative to traditional punishments, often taking the form of convicted criminals holding signs or sweeping streets with a toothbrush. In her Hiding from Humanity, Martha Nussbaum argues against the use of shame punishments because they contribute to an offender's loss of dignity. However, these concerns are shared already by the courts which also have concerns about the possibility that shaming might damage an offender's dignity. This situation has not led the courts to (...)
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  12. Thom Brooks (2007). Hiding From Humanity: Disgust, Shame, and the Law. Journal of Applied Philosophy 24 (3):329–331.
    This is a book review of Martha C. Nussbaum - "Hiding from Humanity".
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  13. Rupert Brown, Jesse Allpress, Roger Giner Sorolla, Julien Deonna & Fabrice Teroni (2014). Two Faces of Shame: Moral Shame and Image Shame Differently Predict Positive and Negative Responses to Ingroup Wrongdoing. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin 40 (10):1270-1284.
    This article proposes distinctions between guilt and two forms of shame: Guilt arises from a violated norm and is characterized by a focus on specific behavior; shame can be characterized by a threatened social image (Image Shame) or a threatened moral essence (Moral Shame). Applying this analysis to group-based emotions, three correlational studies are reported, set in the context of atrocities committed by (British) ingroup members during the Iraq war (Ns = 147, 256, 399). Results showed that the two forms (...)
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  14. E. Christian Brugger (2013). Deonna, Julien A., Raffaele Rodogno, Fabrice Teroni. In Defense of Shame: The Faces of an Emotion. Review of Metaphysics 66 (3):572-573.
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  15. R. Bensen Cain (2008). Shame and Ambiguity in Plato's Gorgias. Philosophy and Rhetoric 41 (3):pp. 212-237.
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  16. Cheshire Calhoun (2004). An Apology for Moral Shame. Journal of Political Philosophy 12 (2):127–146.
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  17. Jerrold R. Caplan (1996). Shame and Necessity. Review of Metaphysics 49 (3):685-687.
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  18. Jenny Chamarette & Jennifer Higgins (eds.) (2010). Guilt and Shame: Essays in French Literature, Thought and Visual Culture. Peter Lang.
    This collection of essays, on French and francophone prose, poetry, drama, visual art, cinema and thought, assesses guilt and shame in relation to structures of ...
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  19. Anne‐Marie Søndergaard Christensen (2013). The Role of Innocent Guilt in Post‐Conflict Work. Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (4):365-378.
    The phenomenon of ‘innocent guilt’ regards cases where people feel guilty without being responsible for the wrongdoing or suffering at which the guilt is directed. The aim of this article is to develop a consistent account of innocent guilt and show how it may arise in the aftermath of conflicts. In order to do this, innocent guilt is contrasted with guilt and collective guilt, and the account is substantiated by drawing on the writings of Ludwig Wittgenstein and Emmanuel Levinas, who (...)
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  20. Ray W. Crozier (1998). Self-Consciousness in Shame: The Role of the 'Other'. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 28 (3):273–286.
    Although several philosophical approaches to shame emphasize the role of the ‘other’ this has attracted less attention from psychologists. The psychological construct of self-awareness does not adequately account for the shift in perspective that is involved in shame or embarrassment. This paper outlines a framework for the analysis of shame which emphasises the adoption of another perspective on the self. It proposes that shame is experienced when an individual recognises that an action can give rise to a negative interpretation by (...)
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  21. Antonio S. Cua (2003). The Ethical Significance of Shame: Insights of Aristotle and Xunzi. Philosophy East and West 53 (2):147-202.
    : A constructive interpretation of the Confucian conception of shame is offered here. Xunzi's discussion is considered the locus classicus of the Confucian conception of shame as contrasted with honor. In order to show his conception as an articulation and development of the more inchoate attitudes of Confucius and Mencius, an excursion is made into the Lunyu and the Mengzi. Aristotle's conception of shame is used as a sort of catalyst, an opening for appreciating Xunzi's complementary insights.
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  22. John Deigh (2006). The Politics of Disgust and Shame. Journal of Ethics 10 (4):383 - 418.
    This is a critical study of Martha Nussbaum’s Hiding from Humanity. Central to Nussbaum’s book are arguments against society’s or the state’s using disgust and shame to forward the aims of the criminal law. Patrick Devlin’s appeal to the common man’s disgust to determine what acts of customary morality should be made criminal is an example of how society might use disgust to forward the aims of the criminal law. The use of so-called shaming penalties as alternative sanctions to imprisonment (...)
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  23. John Deigh (1983). Shame and Self-Esteem: A Critique. Ethics 93 (2):225-245.
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  24. Julien A. Deonna & Fabrice Teroni (2008). Differentiating Shame From Guilt. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1063-1400..
    How does shame differ from guilt? Empirical psychology has recently offered distinct and seemingly incompatible answers to this question. This article brings together four prominent answers into a cohesive whole. These are that (a) shame differs from guilt in being a social emotion; (b) shame, in contrast to guilt, affects the whole self; (c) shame is linked with ideals, whereas guilt concerns prohibitions and (d) shame is oriented towards the self, guilt towards others. After presenting the relevant empirical evidence, we (...)
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  25. Julien A. Deonna & Fabrice Teroni (2008). Shame's Guilt Disproved. Critical Quarterly 50 (4):65-72.
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  26. Julien Deonna, Fabrice Teroni & Raffaele Rodogno (2011). In Defense of Shame. Oxford University Press.
    Is shame social? Is it superficial? Is it a morally problematic emotion? Researchers in disciplines as different as psychology, philosophy, and anthropology have thought so. But what is the nature of shame and why are claims regarding its social nature and moral standing interesting and important? Do they tell us anything worthwhile about the value of shame and its potential legal and political applications? -/- In this book, Julien Deonna, Raffaele Rodogno, and Fabrice Teroni propose an original philosophical account of (...)
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  27. İlham Dilman (1999). Shame, Guilt and Remorse. Philosophical Investigations 22 (4):312–329.
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  28. Ayfer Dost & Bilge Yagmurlu (2008). Are Constructiveness and Destructiveness Essential Features of Guilt and Shame Feelings Respectively? Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 38 (2):109–129.
    This paper involves a critical evaluation of a conceptualization of guilt and shame, which guides a number of research mainly in social psychology. In the contemporary literature, conceptualization of guilt and shame shows variation. In one of the leading approaches, guilt is regarded as an experience that targets behavior in evaluative thought and shame as targeting the self. According to this distinction, guilt has a constructive nature and it motivates the individual to take reparative actions, since it targets the behavior, (...)
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  29. Suzanne Dovi (2005). Guilt and the Problem of Dirty Hands. Constellations 12 (1):128-146.
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  30. Eva-Maria Engelen (2009). Anger, Shame and Justice: The Regulative Function of Emotions in the Ancient and Modern World. In Birgitt Röttger-Rössler & Hans Markowitsch (eds.), Emotions as Bio-cultural Processes. Springer 395-413.
    Analyzing the ancient Greek point of view concerning anger, shame and justice and a very modern one, one can see, that anger has a regulative function, but shame does as well. Anger puts the other in his place, thereby regulating hierarchies. Shame regulates the social relations of recognition. And both emotions also have an evaluative function, because anger evaluates a situation with regard to a humiliation; shame, with regard to a misdemeanor. In addition, attention has to be paid to the (...)
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  31. Ellen K. Feder (2011). Tilting the Ethical Lens: Shame, Disgust, and the Body in Question. Hypatia 26 (3):632-650.
    Cheryl Chase has argued that “the problem” of intersex is one of “stigma and trauma, not gender,” as those focused on medical management would have it. Despite frequent references to shame in the critical literature, there has been surprisingly little analysis of shame, or of the disgust that provokes it. This paper investigates the function of disgust in the medical management of intersex and seeks to understand the consequences—material and moral—with respect to the shame it provokes.Conventional ethical approaches may not (...)
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  32. Peter Forrest (2006). Collective Guilt; Individual Shame. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 30 (1):145–153.
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  33. Peter French (1989). It's a Damn Shame. Social Philosophy Today 2:337-347.
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  34. Phillip Galligan (2014). Shame, Publicity, and Self‐Esteem. Ratio 28 (3).
    Shame is a puzzling emotion. On the one hand, to feel ashamed is to feel badly about oneself; but on the other hand, it also seems to be a response to the way the subject is perceived by other people. So whose standards is the subject worried about falling short of, his own or those of an audience? I begin by arguing that it is the audience's standards that matter, and then present a theory of shame according to which shame (...)
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  35. Jane Geaney (2004). Guarding Moral Boundaries: Shame in Early Confucianism. Philosophy East and West 54 (2):113-142.
    : In response to allegations that China is a "shame culture," scholars of Confucian ethics have made use of new studies in psychology, anthropology, and philosophy that present shame in a more favorable light. These studies contend that shame involves internalization of social moral codes. By adapting these new internal models of shame, Confucian ethicists have attempted to rehabilitate the emphasis on shame in early Confucianism, but in doing so they have inadvertently highlighted the striking absence in early Confucian texts (...)
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  36. Richard J. Golsan (2011). French Memory and the Wages of Guilt. European Journal of Political Theory 10 (4):490-500.
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  37. Jeffrey E. Green (2005). The Shame of Being a Philosopher: Critical Response to Tarnopolsky. Political Theory 33 (2):266 - 272.
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  38. Amber Griffioen (2014). Regaining the 'Lost Self': A Philosophical Analysis of Survivor's Guilt. In Altered Self and Altered Self Experience. 43-57.
    Although there has been much discussion regarding shame and guilt, not enough has been said about the complexities of the relationship between the two. In this paper, I examine one way in which I take shame and guilt to interact – namely in cases of so-called “survivor’s guilt” among victims of trauma. More specifically, I argue that survivor’s guilt may represent a kind of response to feelings of shame – one which is centrally tied to the central philosophical notions of (...)
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  39. Lisa Guenther (2012). Resisting Agamben: The Biopolitics of Shame and Humiliation. Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (1):59-79.
    In Remnants of Auschwitz , Giorgio Agamben argues that the hidden structure of subjectivity is shame. In shame, I am consigned to something that cannot be assumed, such that the very thing that makes me a subject also forces me to witness my own desubjectification. Agamben’s ontological account of shame is problematic insofar as it forecloses collective responsibility and collapses the distinction between shame and humiliation. By recontextualizing three of Agamben’s sources – Primo Levi, Robert Antelme and Maurice Blanchot – (...)
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  40. Lisa Guenther (2011). Shame and the Temporality of Social Life. Continental Philosophy Review 44 (1):23-39.
    Shame is notoriously ambivalent. On one hand, it operates as a mechanism of normalization and social exclusion, installing or reinforcing patterns of silence and invisibility; on the other hand, the capacity for shame may be indispensible for ethical life insofar as it attests to the subject’s constitutive relationality and its openness to the provocation of others. Sartre, Levinas and Beauvoir each offer phenomenological analyses of shame in which its basic structure emerges as a feeling of being exposed to others and (...)
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  41. Gilbert Harman (2009). Guilt-Free Morality. Oxford Studies in Metaethics 4:203-14.
    Here are some of the ways in which some philosophers and psychologists have taken the emotion of guilt to be essential to morality. One relatively central idea is that guilt feelings are warranted if an agent knows that he or she has acted morally wrongly. It might be said that in such a case the agent has a strong reason to feel guilt, that the agent ought to have guilt feelings, that the agent is justified in having guilt feelings and (...)
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  42. Fritz Hartmann (1984). The Corporeality of Shame: Px and Hx at the Bedside. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 9 (1):63-74.
    In order to appreciate the role of the phenomenon of shame in the context of the clinic – both as normal self evaluation and as neurotic response – a philosophical anthropological description of shame is offered. Not only are Biblical metaphors recast, but more recent phenomenological psychological descriptions taken from Max Scheler and others are cited. These necessarily require some account of the patient's body in shame, taken from both his perspective and the physician's. In short, the corporeality of shame (...)
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  43. Agnes Heller (1985). The Power of Shame: A Rational Perspective. Routledge & K. Paul.
    The Power of Shame Introduction The problem of shame, in marked contrast with the problem of conscience, has seldom been thematized in modern moral ...
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  44. Bennett W. Helm (2010). Love, Friendship, and the Self: Intimacy, Identification, and the Social Nature of Persons. Oxford University Press.
    Bennett Helm re-examines our common understanding of ourselves as persons in light of the phenomena of love and friendship.
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  45. Vincent C. Hopkins (1953). Shame and Glory of the Intellectuals. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 28 (2):310-311.
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  46. Arnold Isenberg (1949). Natural Pride and Natural Shame. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 10 (1):1-24.
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  47. Ward E. Jones (2012). A Lover's Shame. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (5):615-630.
    Shame is one of the more painful consequences of loving someone; my beloved’s doing something immoral can cause me to be ashamed of her. The guiding thought behind this paper is that explaining this phenomenon can tell us something about what it means to love. The phenomenon of beloved-induced shame has been largely neglected by philosophers working on shame, most of whom conceive of shame as being a reflexive attitude. Bennett Helm has recently suggested that in order to account for (...)
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  48. Gunnar Karlsson & Lennart Gustav Sjöberg (2009). The Experiences of Guilt and Shame: A Phenomenological–Psychological Study. [REVIEW] Human Studies 32 (3):335 - 355.
    This study aims at discovering the essential constituents involved in the experiences of guilt and shame. Guilt concerns a subject’s action or omission of action and has a clear temporal unfolding entailing a moment in which the subject lives in a care-free way. Afterwards, this moment undergoes a reconstruction, in the moment of guilt, which constitutes the moment of negligence. The reconstruction is a comprehensive transformation of one’s attitude with respect to one’s ego; one’s action; the object of guilt and (...)
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  49. John Kekes (1988). Shame and Moral Progress. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 13 (1):282-296.
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  50. Ruth Kitchen (2013). From Shame Towards an Ethics of Ambiguity. Sartre Studies International 19 (1):55-70.
    For Sartre, shame is not an ethical but an ontological experience. With this in mind, the article examines the philosophical connection between shame and ambiguity through analysis of the experiences of abortion and the Nazi Occupation. The article demonstrates how Beauvoir develops Sartre's ontological notion of shame into an ethical philosophy of ambiguity as a result of wartime experiences. It demonstrates how encounters with shame, abortion, ambiguity and Occupation life in Beauvoir's 1945 novel Le sang des autres elucidate and are (...)
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