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  1. C'Zar Bernstein, Timothy Hsiao & Matthew Palumbo (forthcoming). The Moral Right to Keep and Bear Firearms. Public Affairs Quarterly.
    The moral right to keep and bear arms is entailed by the moral right of self-defense. We argue that the ownership and use of firearms is a reasonable means of exercising these rights. Given their defensive value, there is a strong presumption in favor of enacting civil rights to keep and bear arms ranging from handguns to ‘assault rifles.’ Thus, states are morally obliged as a matter of justice to recognize basic liberties for firearm ownership and usage. Throughout this paper (...)
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  2. James B. Brady (1983). The Justifiability of Hollow‐Point Bullets. Criminal Justice Ethics 2 (2):9-19.
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  3. Nicholas Dixon (2011). Handguns, Philosophers, and the Right to Self-Defense. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (2):151-170.
    Within the last decade or so several philosophers have argued against handgun prohibition on the ground that it violates the right to self-defense. However, even these philosophers grant that the right to own handguns is not absolute and could be overridden if doing so would bring about an enormous social good. Analysis of intra-United States empirical data cited by gun rights advocates indicates that guns do not make us safer, while international data lends powerful support to the thesis that guns (...)
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  4. Nicholas Dixon (1999). Handguns, Violent Crime, and Self-Defense. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 13 (2):239-260.
    By far the most plausible explanation of data on violent crime in the United States is that its high handgun ownership rate is a major causal factor. The only realistic way to significantly reduce violent crime in this country is an outright ban on private ownership of handguns. While such a ban would undeniably restrict one particular freedom, it would violate no rights. In particular, the unquestioned right to self-defense does not entail a right to own handguns, because the evidence (...)
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  5. Timothy Hall (2006). Is There a Right to Bear Arms? Public Affairs Quarterly 20 (4):293-312.
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  6. Todd C. Hughes & Lester H. Hunt (2000). The Liberal Basis of the Right to Bear Arms. Public Affairs Quarterly 14 (1):1-25.
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  7. Lester Hunt, Gun Control. The International Encyclopedia of Ethics.
    The phrase “gun control” has no very precise meaning. It typically refers either to prohibitions of or restrictions on gun ownership on the part of the civilian population. Such rules may apply either to guns in general or to some type of gun (such as handguns). More rarely, it can refer to legal restrictions, not on classes of weapons, but on classes of users, a sort of restriction that might be called “dangerous possessor gun control” (see Risk). In this case, (...)
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  8. John Kleinig & Hugh Lafollette (2001). Gun Control: The Issues. Criminal Justice Ethics 20 (1):17-18.
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  9. Hugh LaFollette (2001). Controlling Guns. Criminal Justice Ethics 20 (1):34-39.
    Wheeler, Stark, and Stell have raised many interesting points concerning gun control that merit extended treatment. Here, however, I will focus only on two. I will then briefly expand on the proposal I offered in the original paper.
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  10. Hugh LaFollette (2000). Gun Control. Ethics 110 (2):263-281.
    Many of us assume we must either oppose or support gun control. Not so. We have a range of alternatives. Even this way of speaking oversimplifies our choices since there are two distinct scales on which to place alternatives. One scale concerns the degree (if at all) to which guns should be abolished. This scale moves from those who want no abolition (NA) of any guns, through those who want moderate abolition (MA) - to forbid access to some subclasses of (...)
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  11. Charles E. Schumer (1995). Commentary: Toward a Rational Gun Policy. Criminal Justice Ethics 14 (2):2-63.
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  12. Cynthia A. Stark (2001). Fundamental Rights and the Right to Bear Arms. Criminal Justice Ethics 20 (1):25-27.
  13. Lance K. Stell (2004). The Production of Criminal Violence in America: Is Strict Gun Control the Solution? Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (1):38-46.
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  14. Lance K. Stell (2001). Gun Control and the Regulation of Fundamental Rights. Criminal Justice Ethics 20 (1):28-33.
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  15. Mercer Sullivan (2007). Review Essay / Is the Language of the Gun French? Criminal Justice Ethics 26 (2):52-57.
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  16. Samuel C. Wheeler (2001). Gun Violence and Fundamental Rights. Criminal Justice Ethics 20 (1):19-24.