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Siblings:History/traditions: Happiness
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  1. Don Adams (1991). Aquinas on Aristotle on Happiness. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 1:98-118.
  2. Sara Ahmed (2010). The Promise of Happiness. Duke University Press.
    Introduction: why happiness, why now? -- Happy objects -- Feminist killjoys -- Unhappy queers -- Melancholic migrants -- Happy futures -- Conclusion: happiness, ethics, possibility.
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  3. J. B. Akam (1995). The Oracle of Wisdom: Towards Philosophic Equipoise. Snaap Press Limited.
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  4. William Alexander, Keith Anderson, Jane Harris, Julian Ingram, Tom Nelson, Katherine Woods & Judy Svensen, On Good and Bad: Whether Happiness is the Highest Good.
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  5. Anna Alexandrova (2008). First-Person Reports and the Measurement of Happiness. Philosophical Psychology 21 (5):571 – 583.
    First-person reports are central to the study of subjective well-being in contemporary psychology, but there is much disagreement about exactly what sort of first-person reports should be used. This paper examines an influential proposal to replace all first-person reports of life satisfaction with introspective reports of affect. I argue against the reasoning behind this proposal, and propose instead a new strategy for deciding what measure is appropriate.
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  6. Peter Allmark (2005). Health, Happiness and Health Promotion. Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (1):1–15.
    This article claims that health promotion is best practised in the light of an Aristotelian conception of the good life for humans and of the place of health within it.
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  7. Robert F. Almeder (2000). Human Happiness and Morality: A Brief Introduction to Ethics. Prometheus Books.
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  8. Zac Alstin (2011). Locked-in Happiness. Bioethics Research Notes 23 (1):11.
    Alstin, Zac Results of a Belgian study have revealed that a large number of people suffering from Locked-In Syndrome are happy. Disability is foremost a challenge to one's values, not to our happiness.
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  9. Edward Scribner Ames (1931). Book Review:The Conquest of Happiness. Bertrand Russell. [REVIEW] Ethics 41 (3):380-.
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  10. Joel Anderson (2010). Nudge: Improving Decisions About Health, Wealth, and Happiness, Richard H. Thaler and Cass R. Sunstein. Yale University Press, 2008. X + 293 Pages. [Paperback Edition, Penguin, 2009, 320 Pages.]. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 26 (03):369-376.
  11. Chrisoula Andreou (2010). A Shallow Route to Environmentally Friendly Happiness: Why Evidence That We Are Shallow Materialists Need Not Be Bad News for the Environment(Alist). Ethics, Place and Environment 13 (1):1 – 10.
    It is natural to assume that we would not be willing to compromise the environment if the conveniences and luxuries thereby gained did not have a substantial positive impact on our happiness. But there is room for skepticism and, in particular, for the thesis that we are compromising the environment to no avail in that our conveniences and luxuries are not having a significant impact on our happiness, making the costs incurred for them a waste. One way of defending the (...)
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  12. Erik Angner (2012). Fred Feldman, What is This Thing Called Happiness? (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010), Pp. Xv + 286. Utilitas 23 (04):458-461.
  13. Julia Annas (1993). The Morality of Happiness. Oxford University Press.
    Ancient ethical theories, based on the notions of virtue and happiness, have struck many as an attractive alternative to modern theories. But we cannot find out whether this is true until we understand ancient ethics--and to do this we need to examine the basic structure of ancient ethical theory, not just the details of one or two theories. In this book, Annas brings together the results of a wide-ranging study of ancient ethical philosophy and presents it in a way that (...)
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  14. Julia Annas (1987). Epicurus on Pleasure and Happiness. Philosophical Topics 15 (2):5-21.
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  15. David W. Ardagh (1979). Aquinas On Happiness. New Scholasticism 53 (4):428-459.
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  16. Charles Wicksteed Armstrong (1951). Road to Happiness. London, Watts.
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  17. Richard Arneson (1985). Book Review:Happiness, Justice and Freedom: The Moral and Political Philosophy of John Stuart Mill. Fred R. Berger; Paternalism. John Kleinig. [REVIEW] Ethics 95 (4):954-.
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  18. John R. Atherton, Elaine L. Graham & Ian Steedman (eds.) (2010). The Practices of Happiness: Political Economy, Religion and Wellbeing. Routledge.
    These essays explore the religious dimensions to a number of key features of well-being, including marriage, crime and rehabilitation, work, inequality, mental ...
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  19. Jean Austin (1968). Pleasure and Happiness. Philosophy 43 (163):51 - 62.
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  20. Michael W. Austin (2007). Chasing Happiness Together : Running and Aristotle's Philosophy of Friendship. In , Running & Philosophy: A Marathon for the Mind. Blackwell Pub..
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  21. Richard Avramenko (2007). The Wound and Salve of Time: Augustine's Politics of Human Happiness. Review of Metaphysics 60 (4):779-811.
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  22. Konrad Banicki (2011). Review of Sissela Bok, Exploring Happiness. From Aristotle to Brain Science. [REVIEW] Metapsychology Online Reviews 15 (10).
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  23. Limin Bao (2011). “Justice is Happiness”?—An Analysis of Plato's Strategies in Response to Challenges From the Sophists. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (2):258-272.
    The challenge from the sophists with whom Plato is confronted is: Who can prove that the just man without power is happy whereas the unjust man with power is not? This challenge concerns the basic issue of politics: the relationship between justice and happiness. Will the unjust man gain the exceptional happiness of the strong by abusing his power and by injustice? The gist of Plato’s reply is to speak not of justice but of intrinsic justice, i.e., the strength of (...)
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  24. Adam Barkman (2009). Negative Happiness. Kritike: An Online Journal of Philosophy 3 (1).
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  25. Emily Barranco (2011). Arthur Dobrin, The Lost Art of Happiness. Journal of Value Inquiry 45 (4):483-485.
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  26. Robert Barron (2007). A Brief History of Happiness. Review of Metaphysics 61 (1):167-169.
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  27. Pierluigi Barrotta (2008). Why Economists Should Be Unhappy with the Economics of Happiness. Economics and Philosophy 24 (2):145-165.
    The economics of happiness is an influential research programme, the aim of which is to change welfare economics radically. In this paper I set out to show that its foundations are unreliable. I shall maintain two basic theses: (a) the economics of happiness shows inconsistencies with the first person standpoint, contrary claims on the part of the economists of happiness notwithstanding, and (b) happiness is a dubious concept if it is understood as the goal of welfare policies. These two theses (...)
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  28. Giorgio Baruchello (2004). Frail Happiness. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 8 (1):150-152.
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  29. Gary Becker, Evolutionary Efficiency and Happiness.
    We model happiness as a measurement tool used to rank alternative actions. Evolution favors a happiness function that measures the individual’s success in relative terms. The optimal function, in particular, is based on a time-varying reference point –or performance benchmark –that is updated over time in a statistically optimal way in order to match the individual’s potential. Habits and peer comparisons arise as special cases of such updating process. This updating also results in a volatile level of happiness that continuously (...)
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  30. Lawrence C. Becker (1999). Stephen Engstrom and Jennifer Whiting, Eds., Aristotle, Kant, and the Stoics: Rethinking Happiness and Duty. [REVIEW] Ethics 109 (2):439-442.
  31. Theodore Benditt (1974). Happiness. Philosophical Studies 25 (1):1 - 20.
    Thus, says Hare, a judgment that someone is happy is an appraisal, not a statement of fact. I do not wish to deny that there are some uses of 'happy', ascribed to a person or to a life, for which this is the case; but I would like to maintain that there are other uses of 'happy', philosophically important ones, in which a judgment that a third person is happy is not an appraisal, but is rather a report about him (...)
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  32. R. P. Bentall (1992). A Proposal to Classify Happiness as a Psychiatric Disorder. Journal of Medical Ethics 18 (2):94-98.
    It is proposed that happiness be classified as a psychiatric disorder and be included in future editions of the major diagnostic manuals under the new name: major affective disorder, pleasant type. In a review of the relevant literature it is shown that happiness is statistically abnormal, consists of a discrete cluster of symptoms, is associated with a range of cognitive abnormalities, and probably reflects the abnormal functioning of the central nervous system. One possible objection to this proposal remains--that happiness is (...)
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  33. Mark Bernstein (2001). L. W. Sumner, Welfare, Happiness and Ethics:Welfare, Happiness and Ethics. Ethics 111 (2):441-443.
  34. Narendra Kumar Berry (1994). Everlasting Happiness. International Foundation for Education of Cosmological Spititualism.
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  35. Richard Bett (2005). Nietzsche, the Greeks, and Happiness (with Special Reference to Aristotle and Epicurus). Philosophical Topics 33 (2):45-70.
  36. Deborah Bihler (1992). Pursuit of Happiness. Business Ethics 6 (2):46-46.
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  37. Alessandro Biral (2005). La Felicità: Lezioni Su Platone E Nietzsche. Il Prato.
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  38. Thomas Blackson (2009). On Feldman's Theory of Happiness. Utilitas 21 (3):393-400.
    Fred Feldman conceives of happiness in terms of the aggregation of attitudinal pleasure and displeasure, but he distinguishes intrinsic from extrinsic attitudinal pleasure and displeasure and excludes extrinsic attitudinal pleasure and displeasure from the aggregation that constitutes happiness. I argue that Feldman has not provided a strong reason for this exclusion.
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  39. James Bogen & Daniel M. Farrell (1978). Freedom and Happiness in Mill's Defence of Liberty. Philosophical Quarterly 28 (113):325-338.
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  40. Greg Bognar (2010). Authentic Happiness. Utilitas 22 (3):272-284.
    This article discusses L. W. Sumner's theory of well-being as authentic happiness. I distinguish between extreme and moderate versions of subjectivism and argue that Sumner's characterization of the conditions of authenticity leads him to an extreme subjective theory. More generally, I also criticize Sumner's argument for the subjectivity of welfare. I conclude by addressing some of the implications of my arguments for theories of well-being in philosophy and welfare measurement in the social sciences.
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  41. Lisa Bortolotti (ed.) (2009). Philosophy and Happiness. Palgrave MacMillan.
    Philosophy and Happiness addresses the need to situate any meaningful discourse about happiness in a wider context of human interests, capacities and circumstances. How is happiness manifested and expressed? Can there be any happiness if no worthy life projects are pursued? How is happiness affected by relationships, illness, or cultural variants? Can it be reduced to preference satisfaction? Is it a temporary feeling or a persistent way of being? Is reflection conducive to happiness? Is mortality necessary for it? These are (...)
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  42. Lisa Bortolotti (ed.) (2008). The Philosophy of Happiness. Palgrave.
    Philosophy and Happiness addresses the need to situate any meaningful discourse about happiness in a wider context of human interests, capacities and circumstances. How is happiness manifested and expressed? Can there be any happiness if no worthy life projects are pursued? How is happiness affected by relationships, illness, or cultural variants? Can it be reduced to preference satisfaction? Is it a temporary feeling or a persistent way of being? Is reflection conducive to happiness? Is mortality necessary for it? These are (...)
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  43. C. V. Boyer (1923). Self-Expression and Happiness: A Study of Matthew Arnold's Idea of Perfection. International Journal of Ethics 33 (3):263-290.
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  44. Gwen Bradford (2012). Fred Feldman, What is This Thing Called Happiness? Journal of Value Inquiry 46 (2):269-273.
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  45. Johan Brännmark (2004). Leading Lives: On Happiness and Narrative Meaning. Philosophical Papers 32 (3):321-343.
    Abstract In contemporary moral philosophy, the standard way of understanding the constituents of the human good is in terms of a fairly limited number of features that contribute to our happiness independently of how they are situated in our lives. Even when this approach is supplemented by Moorean ideas about organic wholes, it still cannot do justice to the deep importance of how things are situated and even when meaning is seen as an important factor, it still tends to be (...)
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  46. Johan Brännmark (2002). Morality and the Pursuit of Happiness: A Study in Kantian Ethics. Dissertation, Lund University
    This work seeks to develop a Kantian ethical theory in terms of a general ontology of values and norms together with a metaphysics of the person that makes sense of this ontology. It takes as its starting point Kant’s assertion that a good will is the only thing that has an unconditioned value and his accompanying view that the highest good consists in virtue and happiness in proportion to virtue. The soundness of Kant’s position on the value of the good (...)
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  47. David Braybrooke (1989). Thoughtful Happiness:Well-Being: Its Meaning, Measurement and Moral Importance. James Griffin; Freedom, Enjoyment, and Happiness: An Essay on Moral Psychology. Richard Warner. Ethics 99 (3):625-.
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  48. E. Brito (1990). The Happiness of God. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 64 (4):491-508.
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  49. Walter E. Broman (2001). The Passion for Happiness: Samuel Johnson and David Hume (Review). Philosophy and Literature 25 (1):169-171.
  50. Bruce Brower (1998). Welfare, Happiness, and Ethics. Philosophical Review 107 (2):309-312.
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