This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
59 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 59
  1. George J. Agich (2009). The Issue of Expertise in Clinical Ethics. Diametros 22:3-20.
    The proliferation of ethics committees and ethics consultation services has engendered a discussion of the issue of the expertise of those who provide clinical ethics consultation services. In this paper, I discuss two aspects of this issue: the cognitive dimension or content knowledge that the clinical ethics consultant should possess and the practical dimension or set of dispositions, skills, and traits that are necessary for effective ethics consultation. I argue that the failure to differentiate and fully explicate these dimensions contributes (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Judith C. Ahronheim, Jonathan Moreno, Connie Zuckerman & Laurence B. McCullough (1995). Ethics in Clinical Practice. HEC Forum 7 (6):377-378.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Judith Andre (2001). The Medical Humanities as an Elephant Seen by Blind Men. Medical Humanities Review.
    Because the medical humanities are multidisciplinary, participants tend to see one another's work through their own disciplinary lens. This can lead to misinterpretations.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Judith Andre (1998). Ethics and Medical Decision-Making. Society for Medical Decision-Making Newsletter (53):6-8.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jonny Anomaly (2012). Is Obesity a Public Health Problem? Public Health Ethics 5 (3):216-221.
    It is often claimed that there is an obesity epidemic in affluent countries, and that obesity is one of the most serious public health threats in the developed world. I will argue that obesity is not an 'epidemic' in any useful sense of the word, and that classifying it as a public health problem requires us to make fairly controversial moral and empirical assumptions. While evidence suggests that the prevalence of obesity is on the rise, and that obesity can lead (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Richard E. Ashcroft (ed.) (2007). Principles of Health Care Ethics. John Wiley & Sons.
    Edited by four leading members of the new generation of medical and healthcare ethicists working in the UK, respected worldwide for their work in medical ethics, Principles of Health Care Ethics, Second Edition_is a standard resource for students, professionals, and academics wishing to understand current and future issues in healthcare ethics. With a distinguished international panel of contributors working at the leading edge of academia, this volume presents a comprehensive guide to the field, with state of the art introductions to (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Benedict M. Ashley (1994). Ethics of Health Care: An Introductory Textbook. Georgetown University Press.
    Contending that concern over the ethical dimensions of these and other like issues are no longer just in the domain of those involved in medical practice, the ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Bertram Bandman (2003). The Moral Development of Health Care Professionals: Rational Decisionmaking in Health Care Ethics. Praeger.
    A central challenge motivates this work: How, if at all, can philosophical ethics help in the moral development of health professionals?
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Bela Blasszauer (1991). Medical Ethics Committees in Hungary Dr. Bela Blasszauer. HEC Forum 3 (5):277-283.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Robyn Bluhm (2007). Clinical Trials as Nomological Machines: Implications for Evidence-Based Medicine. In Harold Kincaid Jennifer McKitrick (ed.), Establishing Medical Reality: Essays In The Metaphysics And Epistemology Of Biomedical Science. Springer.
  11. Jean-Claude Chevrolet & Bara Ricou (2009). Hospital Clinical Ethics Committees. The Geneva Experience - Switzerland. Diametros 22:21-38.
    Hospital ethics committees were created in the United States of America in the 1970s. Their aims were the education of the hospital personnel in the field of ethics, the development of policies and the publication of guidelines concerning ethical issues, as well as consultations and case reviews of hospitalized patients when an ethical concern was present. During the last thirty years, these committees disseminated, particularly in Western Europe. In this manuscript, we describe the benefit, but also some difficulties with these (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. James F. Childress (1982). Who Should Decide?: Paternalism in Health Care. Oxford University Press.
    "A very good book indeed: there is scarcely an issue anyone has thought to raise about the topic which Childress fails to treat with sensitivity and good judgement....Future discussions of paternalism in health care will have to come to terms with the contentions of this book, which must be reckoned the best existing treatment of its subject."--Ethics. "A clear, scholarly and balanced analysis....This is a book I can recommend to physicians, ethicists, students of both fields, and to those most affected--the (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Ezio Di Nucci (2014). Contraception and Double Effect. American Journal of Bioethics 14 (7):42-43.
  14. Nina di Pietro, Louise Whiteley & Judy Illes (2012). Treatments and Services for Neurodevelopmental Disorders on Advocacy Websites: Information or Evaluation? [REVIEW] Neuroethics 5 (2):197-209.
    The Internet has quickly gained popularity as a major source of health-related information, but its impact is unclear. Here, we investigate the extent to which advocacy websites for three neurodevelopmental disorders—cerebral palsy (CP), autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD)—inform stakeholders about treatment options, and discuss the ethical challenges inherent in providing such information online. We identified major advocacy websites for each disorder and assessed website accountability, the number, attributes, and accessibility of treatments described, and the valence (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Lisa Diedrich (2007). Doing Queer Love: Feminism, AIDS, and History. Theoria 54 (112):25-50.
    In this essay, I utilize the concept of the echo, as formulated in the historical and methodological work of Michel Foucault and Joan W. Scott, to help theorize the historical relationship between health feminism and AIDS activism. I trace the echoes between health feminism and AIDS activism in order to present a more complex history of both movements, and to try to think through the ways that the coming together of these two struggles in a particular place and time—New York (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Andrea Dörries (2009). The 4-Step Approach. Ethics Case Discussion in Hospitals. Diametros 22:39-46.
    The goal of an ethics case discussion is to find the best decision for the patient and the other persons involved (relatives, doctors, nurses and others) from an ethical point of view, in a communicative respect and from a psychosocial view. In the end, it may not mean changing one’s view or even one’s own position, but rather to exchange arguments, weight them and come to a consensus as to further action. The latter is important as the topics concern patients (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Bernice Elger & David Shaw (forthcoming). Preventing Human Rights Violations in Prison – the Role of Guidelines. In Bernice Elger, Catherine Ritter & Heino Stöver (eds.), Emerging Issues in Prison Health. Springer.
    It is well known that prisoners’ human rights are often violated. In this chapter we examine whether guidelines can be effective in preventing such violations and in helping physicians resolve the significant conflicts of interest that they often face in trying to protect prisoners’ rights. We begin by explaining the role of clinical and ethical guidelines outside prisons, in the context of healthcare for non-incarcerated prisoners, and then the specific role of such guidelines within prisons, where the main concerns are (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Paul J. Ford (2008). Special Section on Clincial Neuroethics Consultation: Introduction. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 20 (4):311-314.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Henda Foreid, Carla Bentes & José Pimentel (2010). The Use of Placebo as a Provocative Test in the Diagnosis of Psychogenic Non Epileptic Seizures. Neuroethics 3 (2):95-98.
    Psychogenic non epileptic seizures (PNES) are clinical events of psychological nature. Video-electroencephalography monitoring (V-EEGM) is a valuable method for the diagnosis of PNES and may be combined with provocative tests to induce seizures. The use of placebo in provocative tests for the diagnosis of PNES is controversial because of associated deception, and contrasts with the use of truly decreasing epileptogenic threshold techniques such as hyperventilation and photo stimulation. We present a clinical case of a pregnant woman with a past history (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Kwm Fulford (2004). Neuro-Ethics or Neuro-Values? Delusion and Religious Experience as a Case Study in Values-Based Medicine. Poiesis and Praxis 2 (4):297-313.
    Values-Based Medicine (VBM) is the theory and practice of clinical decision-making for situations in which legitimately different values are in play. VBM is thus to values what Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) is to facts. The theoretical basis of VBM is a branch of analytic philosophy called philosophical value theory. As a set of practical tools, VBM has been developed to meet the challenges of value diversity as they arise particularly in psychiatry. These challenges are illustrated in this paper by a case (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Maya J. Goldenberg (2012). Defining Quality of Care Persuasively. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (4):243-261.
    As the quality movement in health care now enters its fourth decade, the language of quality is ubiquitous. Practitioners, organizations, and government agencies alike vociferously testify their commitments to quality and accept numerous forms of governance aimed at improving quality of care. Remarkably, the powerful phrase ‘‘quality of care’’ is rarely defined in the health care literature. Instead it operates as an accepted and assumed goal worth pursuing. The status of evidence-based medicine, for instance, hinges on its ability to improve (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Maya J. Goldenberg (2010). Perspectives on Evidence-Based Healthcare for Women. Journal of Women's Health 19 (7):1235-1238.
    We live in an age of evidence-based healthcare, where the concept of evidence has been avidly and often uncritically embraced as a symbol of legitimacy, truth, and justice. By letting the evidence dictate healthcare decision making from the bedside to the policy level, the normative claims that inform decision making appear to be negotiated fairly—without subjectivity, prejudice, or bias. Thus, the term ‘‘evidence-based’’ is typically read in the health sciences as the empirically adequate standard of reasonable practice and a means (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Maya J. Goldenberg (2009). Iconoclast or Creed? Objectivism, Pragmatism, and the Hierarchy of Evidence. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 52 (2):168-187.
    Because “evidence” is at issue in evidence-based medicine (EBM), the critical responses to the movement have taken up themes from post-positivist philosophy of science to demonstrate the untenability of the objectivist account of evidence. While these post-positivist critiques seem largely correct, I propose that when they focus their analyses on what counts as evidence, the critics miss important and desirable pragmatic features of the evidence-based approach. This article redirects critical attention toward EBM’s rigid hierarchy of evidence as the culprit of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Maya J. Goldenberg (2007). &Quot;health.&Quot; In [REFERENCE] Oxford Encyclopedia of Women in World History. Oxford University Press.
    No categories
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Daniel Groll (2011). What Health Care Providers Know: A Taxonomy of Clinical Disagreements. Hastings Center Report 41 (5):27-36.
    When, if ever, can healthcare provider's lay claim to knowing what is best for their patients? In this paper, I offer a taxonomy of clinical disagreements. The taxonomy, I argue, reveals that healthcare providers often can lay claim to knowing what is best for their patients, but that oftentimes, they cannot do so *as* healthcare providers.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Nicole Hassoun (2012). Measuring Global Health Impact: Incentivizing Research and Development of Drugs for Neglected Diseases. Developing World Bioethics 12 (3):121-134.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. L. Hawryluck (2002). Neuromuscular Blockers--A Means of Palliation? Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (3):170-172.
  28. Jules Holroyd (forthcoming). Clarifying Capacity: Reasons and Value. In Lubomira Radoilska (ed.), Autonomy and Mental Health. Oxford University Press.
    It is usually appropriate for adults to make significant decisions, such as about what kinds of medical treatment to undergo, for themselves. But sometimes impairments are suffered - either temporary or permanent - which render an individual unable to make such decisions. The Mental Capacity Act 2005 sets out the conditions under which it is appropriate to regard an individual as lacking the capacity to make a particular decision (and when provisions should be made for a decision on their behalf). (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Donna Jeffery & Jennifer Nelson (2011). 'What Are We To Do About Difference?': Race, Culture and the Ethical Encounter. Ethics and Social Welfare 5 (3):247-265.
    This paper is based on the findings from a study in which social workers in healthcare settings were asked for their perspectives on cultural and racial difference as these apply to their practice with racialized clients. In examining the varied practice philosophies and approaches they employ, we find that older practice models based on problematized knowledge about racialized Others are being, alternately, reinstated and contested. In grappling with how to practise, participants describe approaches that, in many cases, effectively individualize clients (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Fabrice Jotterand, Does Virtue Ethics Contribute to Medical Ethics? : An Examination of Stanley Hauerwas' Ethics of Virtue and its Relevance to Medical Ethics.
    The aim of this thesis is to examine the concept of virtue ethics in Stanley Hauerwas's understanding of virtue and delineate how that contributes to his ethical reasoning and his comprehension of medical ethics. The first chapter focuses on the shift that occurred in moral theory under the stance of the Enlightenment that eroded the traditional idea of morality as the formation of the self, allowing space for new concepts that dismissed the importance of the agent in the ethical task (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Niklas Juth & Christian Munthe (2012). The Ethics of Screening in Health Care and Medicine: Serving Society Or Serving the Patient? Springer Verlag.
    This book involves an in-depth analysis of the ethical, political and philosophical issues related to health-oriented screening programs.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Bryan Kibbe (2011). Aging and Disasters: Facing Natural and Other Disasters. In Ethics, Aging, and Society: The Critical Turn. Springer Publishing. 255-279.
    “Aging and Disasters,” is an effort to tell a consistent and compelling story about the elderly amidst catastrophic disaster, and to then develop an ethical analysis and practical strategy for addressing the unique situation of the elderly. In the first portion of the chapter I make the case that the elderly are routinely overlooked amidst catastrophic disasters, and thereby often suffer disproportionately relative to the general population. More than being just a vulnerable population of people, the elderly are susceptible to (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Vic Larcher (2009). The Development and Function of Clinical Ethics Committees (CECs) in the United Kingdom. Diametros 22:47-63.
    In the UK an increasing number of Clinical Ethics Committees (CECs) have been developed mainly in response to local need and interest. Their functions include education of health professionals, of policy and guideline development, and case review (both retrospective analysis of topics and advice on acute cases). The UK Clinical Ethics Network, a charitable foundation provides CEC s with help, support and advice and enables them to share their experience The legal status of UK CECs is unclear but some legal (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Ignacio Mastroleo (forthcoming). Introducción al problema de la continuidad del tratamiento beneficioso para los sujetos de investigación. In Jorge Alberto Álvarez Díaz (ed.), Ensayos sobre ética de la salud. Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Unidad Xochimilco.
    ¿Qué ocurre con la continuidad del tratamiento de los sujetos de investigación después de que realizan la última visita del ensayo en el que participan? En algunos casos, la falta de continuidad de atención de la salud apropiada podría poner en peligro la salud de estas personas. Por lo tanto, es probable que los sujetos de investigación que al terminar su participación en un ensayo todavía se encuentran enfermos, necesiten continuar con el tratamiento en estudio u otra atención de la (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Ignacio Mastroleo (2011). The evaluation of scientific research in democratic societies: Kitcher, Rawls and the approach of scientific significant truths. Revista Redbioética/UNESCO 2 (4):43-60.
    This paper critically assesses the model of evaluation of scientific research for democratic societies defended by Philip Kitcher. The “significant truth” approach proposes a viable alternative to two classic images of science: that of the “critics”, who believe that science always serves the interests of the powerful and that of the “faithful”, who argue that the pursuit of scientific knowledge is always valuable and necessary. However, the democratic justification of Kitcher’s proposal is not compatible with the ethical problems generated by (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. James T. McHugh (1994). Health Care Reform and Abortion: A Catholic Moral Perspective. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 19 (5):491-500.
    The Catholic Church in the United States provides extensive health care service through its more than 600 health facilities. The Church, on the basis of its moral teaching, sees health care as a basic human right and supports universal coverage. At the same time, the Church considers abortion morally wrong and opposes coverage of abortion as a health service in a national health plan. Mandated coverage of abortion would violate the moral commitments of Catholic hospitals and the consciences of Catholics (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Sheila A. M. McLean (2009). Clinical Ethics Consultation in the United Kingdom. Diametros 22:76 – 89.
    The system of clinical ethics committees (CECs) in the United Kingdom is based on goodwill. No formal requirements exist as to constitution, membership, range of expertise or the status of their recommendations. Healthcare professionals are not obliged to use CECs where they exist, nor to follow any advice received. In addition, the make-up of CECs suggests that ethics itself may be under-represented. In most cases, there is one member with a training in ethics – the rest are healthcare professionals or (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Carolyn McLeod (2008). Referral in the Wake of Conscientious Objection to Abortion. Hypatia 23 (4):pp. 30-47.
    Currently, the preferred accommodation for conscientious objection to abortion in medicine is to allow the objector to refuse to accede to the patient’s request so long as the objector refers the patient to a physician who performs abortions. The referral part of this arrangement is controversial, however. Pro-life advocates claim that referrals make objectors complicit in the performance of acts that they, the objectors, find morally offensive. McLeod argues that the referral requirement is justifiable, although not in the way that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (11 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Lydia L. Moland (2006). Moral Integrity and Regret in Nursing. In Sioban Nelson & Suzanne Gordon (eds.), The Complexities of Care: Nursing Reconsidered. Cornell University Press.
    Nurses all too often experience situations that threaten their identification with the caring aspect of their profession. This article examines systematic reasons for the loss of integrity they describe as their lived work experience conflicts with their self-conception. I examine Ruth Barcan Marcus' description of moral dilemmas and the role of regret, arguing that the real experience of regret should not be associated with a lack of integrity. I conclude that a more complex understanding of care in nurses' self-understanding is (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Peter Olsthoorn, Myriame Bollen & Robert Beeres (2013). Dual Loyalties in Military Medical Care – Between Ethics and Effectiveness. In Herman Amersfoort, Rene Moelker, Joseph Soeters & Desiree Verweij (eds.), Moral Responsibility & Military Effectiveness. Asser.
  41. Karl Persson (2013). The Right Perspective on Responsibility for Ill Health. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):429-441.
    There is a growing trend in policy making of holding people responsible for their lifestyle-based diseases. This has sparked a heated debate on whether people are responsible for these illnesses, which has now come to an impasse. In this paper, I present a psychological model that explains why different views on people’s responsibility for their health exist and how we can reach a resolution of the disagreement. My conclusion is that policymakers should not perceive people as responsible while health care (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Jessica Pierce (2004). The Ethics of Environmentally Responsible Health Care. Oxford University Press.
    This book shows how environmental decline relates to human health and to health care practices in the U.S. and other industrialized countries. It outlines the environmental trends that will strongly affect health, and challenges us to see the connections between ways of practicing medicine and the very environmental problems that damage ecosystems and make people sick. In addition to philosophical analysis of the converging values of bioethics and envrionmental ethics, the book offers case studies as well as a number of (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Tanja Ramsauer & Andreas Frewer (2009). Clinical Ethics Committees and Pediatrics. An Evaluation of Case Consultations. Diametros 22:90 – 104.
    Since Clinical Ethics Consultation has become important in the public health sector in the last decade in Germany, there are on-going questions about effectiveness. Targets have been established by the Ethics Committees, in regard to assisting patients, families and health care teams at times of ethical conflicts during the decision-making process in medical care. Of all the ethics consultations over the last eight years at Erlangen University Hospital the consultations carried out in the pediatric department were chosen to be reviewed (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Meredith C. Schwartz (2009). Trust and Responsibility in Health Policy. Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (2):116-133.
    Discussions of both personal responsibility and the importance of trust in health-care settings are increasingly prominent in the bioethics literature. In this paper I link the two discussions and argue that health policies that include personal responsibility ought to address climates of social trust. Trust is a social good that is not always fairly distributed. Disadvantaged social groups often face default distrust. I suggest that agent-centered models in which responsibilities are negotiated do a better job of repairing social distrust than (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. David Shaw (2011). The Ethics Committee as Ghost Author. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (12):706-706.
    Ethics committees have a bad reputation for impeding, rather than facilitating research. Here, I argue that many committees actually improve the quality of the research proposal to such an extent that they deserve credit as authors in any resulting publications, or at least an acknowledgement of the contribution made.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. David Shaw & Bernice Elger (2013). The Relevance of Relevance in Research. Swiss Medical Weekly.
    A new Swiss law requires that any research involving humans must aim to answer "a relevant research question". This paper explains the relevance of the relevance criterion in research, analyses the Swiss and British guidelines on relevance, and proposes a framework for researchers and REC members that enables a clearer conception of the role of relevance in research. We conclude that research must be either scientifically or societally beneficial in order to qualify as relevant, and RECs therefore cannot avoid reviewing (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Jeremy Snyder (2009). Easy Rescues and Organ Transplantation. HEC Forum 21 (1):27-53.
    Many people in desperate need of an organ will die on waiting lists for transplantation or face increased morbidity because of their wait. This circumstance is particularly troubling since many viable organs for transplantation go unused when individuals fail to participate in their local organ donation system. In this paper, I consider whether participating in organ transplantation should be considered a form of a rescue of others from the great harms caused by a shortage in transplantable organs. Specifically, I consider (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Tom Tomlinson, Judith Andre & Len Fleck (2003). Ethics, Professionalism, and Humanities at Michigan State University College of Human Medicine. Academic Medicine 78 (10).
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Eleanor Updale (2009). The Role of Clinical Ethics Committees. Diametros 22:116-123.
    Over the past 15 years or so, Clinical Ethics Committees (CECs) have been established in many healthcare settings in the UK. How do they work, who sits on them, and what do they discuss? How formal should they be? Should their decisions be binding on clinicians, or purely advisory? Should they offer their services to patients and their families too? Are they valuable additions to clinical support, or simply intellectual talking-shops for their members? Should other countries set up CECs as (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Sean A. Valles (2012). Heterogeneity of Risk Within Racial Groups, a Challenge for Public Health Programs. Preventive Medicine 55 (5):405-408.
    Targeting high-risk populations for public health interventions is a classic tool of public health promotion programs. This practice becomes thornier when racial groups are identified as the at-risk populations. I present the particular ethical and epistemic challenges that arise when there are low-risk subpopulations within racial groups that have been identified as high-risk for a particular health concern. I focus on two examples. The black immigrant population does not have the same hypertension risk as US-born African Americans. Similarly, Finnish descendants (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 59