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  1. George J. Agich (2009). The Issue of Expertise in Clinical Ethics. Diametros 22:3-20.
    The proliferation of ethics committees and ethics consultation services has engendered a discussion of the issue of the expertise of those who provide clinical ethics consultation services. In this paper, I discuss two aspects of this issue: the cognitive dimension or content knowledge that the clinical ethics consultant should possess and the practical dimension or set of dispositions, skills, and traits that are necessary for effective ethics consultation. I argue that the failure to differentiate and fully explicate these dimensions contributes (...)
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  2. A. Albertsen & C. Knight (forthcoming). A Framework for Luck Egalitarianism in Health and Healthcare. Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Several attempts have been made to apply the choice-sensitive theory of distributive justice, luck egalitarianism, in the context of health and healthcare. This article presents a framework for this discussion by highlighting different normative decisions to be made in such an application, some of the objections to which luck egalitarians must provide answers and some of the practical implications associated with applying such an approach in the real world. It is argued that luck egalitarians should address distributions of health rather (...)
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  3. Jess Alderman, Jason A. Smith, Ellen J. Fried & Richard A. Daynard (2007). Application of Law to the Childhood Obesity Epidemic. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35 (1):90-112.
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  4. Susan M. Allan, Benjamin Mason Meier, Joan Miles, Gregg Underheim & Anne C. Haddix (2007). Why and How States Are Updating Their Public Health Laws. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 35:39-42.
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  5. Sudhir Anand, Fabienne Peter & Amartya Sen (eds.) (2004). Public Health, Ethics, and Equity. OUP.
    These are some of the important questions that this book addresses in building an interdisciplinary understanding of health equity. (Midwest).
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  6. Jonny Anomaly (2012). Is Obesity a Public Health Problem? Public Health Ethics 5 (3):216-221.
    It is often claimed that there is an obesity epidemic in affluent countries, and that obesity is one of the most serious public health threats in the developed world. I will argue that obesity is not an 'epidemic' in any useful sense of the word, and that classifying it as a public health problem requires us to make fairly controversial moral and empirical assumptions. While evidence suggests that the prevalence of obesity is on the rise, and that obesity can lead (...)
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  7. Marco Azevedo (2013). Human Enhancement: A New Issue in Philosophical Agenda. Princípios. Revista de Filosofía 20 (33):265-303.
    Since before we can remember, humanity aims to overcome its biological limitations; such a goal has certainly played a key role in the advent of technique. However, despite the benefits that technique may bring, the people who make use of it will inevitably be under risk of harm. Even though human technical wisdom consists in attaining the best result without compromising anybody’s safety, misuses are always a possibility in the horizon. Nowadays, technology can be used for more than just improving (...)
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  8. Zbigniew Bańkowski & John H. Bryant (eds.) (1995). Poverty, Vulnerability, the Value of Human Life, and the Emergence of Bioethics: Highlights and Papers of the Xxviiith Cioms Conference, Ixtapa, Guerrero State, Mexico, 17-20 April 1994. [REVIEW] Cioms.
  9. Zbigniew Bańkowski, John H. Bryant & J. Gallagher (eds.) (1997). Ethics, Equity, and the Renewal of Who's Health-for-All Strategy: Proceedings of the Xxixth Cioms Conference, Geneva, Switzerland 12-14 March 1997. [REVIEW] Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (Cioms).
  10. Nora K. Bell (1989). Review: What Setting Limits May Mean: A Feminist Critique of Daniel Callahan's "Setting Limits". [REVIEW] Hypatia 4 (2):169 - 178.
    In Setting Limits, Daniel Callahan advances the provocative thesis that age be a limiting factor in decisions to allocate certain kinds of health services to the elderly. However, when one looks at available data, one discovers that there are many more elderly women than there are elderly men, and these older women are poorer, more apt to live alone, and less likely to have informal social and personal supports than their male counterparts. Older women, therefore, will make the heaviest demand (...)
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  11. J. Boyle (1996). Catholic Social Justice and Health Care Entitlement Packages. Christian Bioethics 2 (3):280-292.
    This paper explores the implications of Roman Catholic teachings on social justice and rights to health care. It argues that contemporary societies, such as those in North America and Western Europe, have an obligation to provide health care to their citizens as a matter of right. Moral considerations provide a basis for evaluating concerns about the role of equality when determining health care entitlements and giving some precision to the widespread belief that the right to health care requires equal entitlement (...)
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  12. Dan Brock (2002). Priority to the Worse Off in Health Care Resource Prioritization. In Margaret Battin (ed.), Medicine and Social Justice. Oxford University Press. 373-389.
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  13. Dan W. Brock (1989). Review: Justice, Health Care, and the Elderly. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Public Affairs 18 (3):297 - 312.
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  14. Thom Brooks (2012). Preserving Capabilities. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (6):48-49.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 6, Page 48-49, June 2012.
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  15. Allen Buchanan (2009). Justice and Health Care: Selected Essays. OUP USA.
    In this volume Allen Buchanan collects ten of his most influential essays on justice and healthcare and connects the concerns of bioethicists with those of political philosophers, focusing not just on the question of which principles of justice in healthcare ought to be implemented, but also on the question of the legitimacy of institutions through which they are implemented. With an emphasis on the institutional implementation of justice in healthcare, Buchanan pays special attention to the relationship between moral commitments and (...)
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  16. Vanessa Carbonell (forthcoming). How to Put Prescription Drug Ads on Your Syllabus. Teaching Philosophy 37 (3).
  17. Jean-Claude Chevrolet & Bara Ricou (2009). Hospital Clinical Ethics Committees. The Geneva Experience - Switzerland. Diametros 22:21-38.
    Hospital ethics committees were created in the United States of America in the 1970s. Their aims were the education of the hospital personnel in the field of ethics, the development of policies and the publication of guidelines concerning ethical issues, as well as consultations and case reviews of hospitalized patients when an ethical concern was present. During the last thirty years, these committees disseminated, particularly in Western Europe. In this manuscript, we describe the benefit, but also some difficulties with these (...)
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  18. Leonardo D. de Castro & Peter A. Sy (1998). Critical Care in the Philippines: The "Robin Hood Principle" Vs. Kagandahang Loob. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (6):563 – 580.
    Practical medical decisions are closely integrated with ethical and religious beliefs in the Philippines. This is shown in a survey of Filipino physicians' attitudes towards severely compromised neonates. This is also the reason why the ethical analysis of critical care practices must be situated within the context of local culture. Kagandahang loob and kusang loob are indigenous Filipino ethical concepts that provide a framework for the analysis of several critical care practices. The practice of taking-from-the-rich-to-give-to-the-poor in public hospitals is not (...)
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  19. Peggye Dilworth-Anderson, Geraldine Pierre & Tandrea S. Hilliard (2012). Social Justice, Health Disparities, and Culture in the Care of the Elderly. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 40 (1):26-32.
    Older minority Americans experience worse health outcomes than their white counterparts, exhibiting the need for social justice in all areas of their health care. Justice, fairness, and equity are crucial to minimizing conditions that adversely affect the health of individuals and communities. In this paper, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is used as an example of a health care disparity among elderly Americans that requires social justice interventions. Cultural factors play a crucial role in AD screening, diagnosis, and access to care, and (...)
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  20. Andrea Dörries (2009). The 4-Step Approach. Ethics Case Discussion in Hospitals. Diametros 22:39-46.
    The goal of an ethics case discussion is to find the best decision for the patient and the other persons involved (relatives, doctors, nurses and others) from an ethical point of view, in a communicative respect and from a psychosocial view. In the end, it may not mean changing one’s view or even one’s own position, but rather to exchange arguments, weight them and come to a consensus as to further action. The latter is important as the topics concern patients (...)
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  21. Thomas Douglas (2009). Medical Injury Compensation: Beyond 'No-Fault'. Medical Law Review 17:30-51.
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  22. Speranta Dumitru (2010). Consentement présumé, famille et équité dans le don d'organes. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 3 (3):341-354.
    Cet article propose une évaluation éthique des institutions qui organisent la transplantation avec donneurs décédés, au travers du rôle qu’elles accordent à la famille survivante. Son objectif est double. Il s’agit, premièrement, de montrer que la famille possède un pouvoir de décision considérable en matière de prélèvement posthume bien que les législations soient habituellement décrites comme fondées sur le consentement ou l’opposition des personnes concernées. Deuxièmement, il s’agit de montrer que les politiques qui octroient un tel pouvoir aux familles manquent (...)
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  23. Jason T. Eberl, Eleanor K. Kinney & Matthew J. Williams (2011). Foundation for a Natural Right to Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (6):537-557.
    Discussions concerning whether there is a natural right to health care may occur in various forms, resulting in policy recommendations for how to implement any such right in a given society. But health care policies may be judged by international standards including the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The rights enumerated in the UDHR are grounded in traditions of moral theory, a philosophical analysis of which is necessary in order to adjudicate the value of specific policies designed to enshrine (...)
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  24. Daniel Engster (2014). The Social Determinants of Health, Care Ethics and Just Health Care. Contemporary Political Theory 13 (2):149-167.
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  25. John R. Evans (1993). International Challenges and Opportunities in Health. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 21 (1):10-15.
  26. N. Eyal (2012). Why Treat Noncompliant Patients? Beyond the Decent Minimum Account. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (6):572-588.
    Patients’ medical conditions can result from their own avoidable risk taking. Some lung diseases result from avoidable smoking and some traffic accidents result from victims’ reckless driving. Although in many nonmedical areas we hold people responsible for taking risks they could avoid, it is normally harsh and inappropriate to deny patients care because they risked needing it. Why? A popular account is that protecting everyone’s "decent minimum," their basic needs, matters more than the benefits of holding people accountable. This account (...)
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  27. Nir Eyal & Alex Voorhoeve (2011). Inequalities in HIV Care: Chances Versus Outcomes. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (12):42-44.
    We analyse three moral dilemmas involving resource allocation in care for HIV-positive patients. Ole Norheim and Kjell Arne Johansson have argued that these cases reveal a tension between egalitarian concerns and concerns for better population health. We argue, by contrast, that these cases reveal a tension between, on the one hand, a concern for equal *chances*, and, on the other hand, both a concern for better health and an egalitarian concern for equal *outcomes*. We conclude that, in these cases, there (...)
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  28. Ruth R. Faden, Liza Dawson, Alison S. Bateman‐House, Dawn Mueller Agnew, Hilary Bok, Dan W. Brock, Aravinda Chakravarti, Xiao‐Jiang Gao, Mark Greene, John A. Hansen, Patricia A. King, Stephen J. O'Brien, David H. Sachs, Kathryn E. Schill, Andrew Siegel, Davor Solter, Sonia M. Suter, Catherine M. Verfaillie, Leroy B. Walters & John D. Gearhart (2003). Public Stem Cell Banks: Considerations of Justice in Stem Cell Research and Therapy. Hastings Center Report 33 (6):13-27.
    If stem cell-based therapies are developed, we will likely confront a difficult problem of justice: for biological reasons alone, the new therapies might benefit only a limited range of patients. In fact, they might benefit primarily white Americans, thereby exacerbating long-standing differences in health and health care.
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  29. Ruth Faden & Madison Powers (2013). Biotechnology, Justice and Health. Journal of Practical Ethics 1 (1):49-61.
    New biotechnologies have the potential to both dramatically improve human well-being and dramatically widen inequalities in well-being. This paper addresses a question that lies squarely on the fault line of these two claims: When as a matter of justice are societies obligated to include a new biotechnology in a national healthcare system? This question is approached from the standpoint of a twin aim theory of justice, in which social structures, including nation-states, have double-barreled theoretical objectives with regard to human well-being. (...)
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  30. Lisa Fuller (2006). Justified Commitments? Considering Resource Allocation and Fairness in Médecins Sans Frontières-Holland. Developing World Bioethics 6 (2):59–70.
    Non-governmental aid programs are an important source of health care for many people in the developing world. Despite the central role non-governmental organizations (NGOs) play in the delivery of these vital services, for the most part they either lack formal systems of accountability to their recipients altogether, or have only very weak requirements in this regard. This is because most NGOs are both self-mandating and self-regulating. What is needed in terms of accountability is some means by which all the relevant (...)
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  31. Maya J. Goldenberg (2012). Defining Quality of Care Persuasively. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (4):243-261.
    As the quality movement in health care now enters its fourth decade, the language of quality is ubiquitous. Practitioners, organizations, and government agencies alike vociferously testify their commitments to quality and accept numerous forms of governance aimed at improving quality of care. Remarkably, the powerful phrase ‘‘quality of care’’ is rarely defined in the health care literature. Instead it operates as an accepted and assumed goal worth pursuing. The status of evidence-based medicine, for instance, hinges on its ability to improve (...)
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  32. Mark Greene & Steven Augello (2011). Everworse: What's Wrong with Selecting for Disability? Public Affairs Quarterly 25 (2):131-140.
    In this paper we challenge the moral consensus against selection for disability. Our discussion will concern only those disabilities that are compatible with a life worth living from the point of view of the disabled individual. We will argue that an influential, impersonal argument against selection for disability falls to a counterexample. We will then show how the reach of the counterexample can be broadened to make trouble for anyone who objects to selection for disability. If we are right about (...)
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  33. Benjamin Hale (2009). Is Justice Good for Your Sleep? (And Therefore, Good for Your Health?). Social Theory and Health 7 (4):354-370.
    In this paper, we present an argument strengthening the view of Norman Daniels, Bruce Kennedy and Ichiro Kawachi that justice is good for one's health. We argue that the pathways through which social factors produce inequalities in sleep more strongly imply a unidirectional and non-voluntary causality than with most other public health issues. Specifically, we argue against the 'voluntarism objection' – an objection that suggests that adverse public health outcomes can be traced back to the free and voluntary choices of (...)
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  34. Daniel Halliday (2011). Book Review: Jonathan Wolff, 'Ethics and Public Policy: A Philosophical Inquiry'. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews (2011.12.16).
  35. Kristen Hessler (2013). Hard Cases: Philosophy, Public Health, and Women's Human Rights. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 47 (4):375-390.
  36. Helen B. Holmes & Laura Purdy (eds.) (1992). Feminist Perspectives in Medical Ethics. Indiana University Press.
    The fields of medical ethics, bioethics, and women's studies have experienced unprecedented growth in the last forty years. Along with the rapid pace of development in medicine and biology, and changes in social expectations, moral quandaries about the body and social practices involving it have multiplied. Philosophers are uniquely situated to attempt to clarify and resolves these questions. Yet the subdiscipline of bioethics still in large part reflects mainstream scholars' lack of interest in gender as a category of analysis. This (...)
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  37. Samia A. Hurst (2012). Éthique et santé publique. Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 7 (3):59-67.
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  38. Lesley Jacobs (1996). Can An Egalitarian Justify Universal Access to Health Care? Social Theory and Practice 22 (3):315-348.
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  39. Wilson James (2009). Not So Special After All? Daniels and the Social Determinants of Health. Journal of Medical Ethics 35:3 - 6..
    Just health: meeting health needs fairly is an ambitious book, in which Norman Daniels attempts to bring together in a single framework all his work on health and justice from the past 25 years. One major aim is to reconcile his earlier work on the special moral importance of healthcare with his later work on the social determinants of health. In his earlier work, Daniels argued that healthcare is of special moral importance because it protects opportunity. In this later work, (...)
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  40. Kristin Janssens, Marleen Bosmans, Els Leye & Marleen Temmerman (2006). Sexual and Reproductive Health of Asylum-Seeking and Refugee Women in Europe: Entitlements and Access to Health Services. Journal of Global Ethics 2 (2):183 – 196.
    Asylum-seeking and refugee women (ASRW) are population groups characterized by diverse social, economic and legal backgrounds as well as diverse needs. Their backgrounds of forced migration have a profound impact on their overall health, including their sexual and reproductive health (SRH). In Europe, the SRH needs of ASRW are usually more pressing than those of the host country population. In the context of refugee health, it is important to distinguish between asylum seekers and statutory refugees, as asylum seekers have distinct (...)
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  41. Janis H. Jenkins (2013). Palpable Insecurity and Sen's Comparative View of Justice: Anthropological Considerations. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 16 (2):266-283.
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  42. J. Paul Kelleher (forthcoming). Beneficence, Justice, and Health Care. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal.
    This paper argues that societal duties of health promotion are underwritten (at least in large part) by a principle of beneficence. Further, this principle generates duties of justice that correlate with rights, not merely “imperfect” duties of charity or generosity. To support this argument, I draw on a useful distinction from bioethics and on a somewhat neglected approach to social obligation from political philosophy. The distinction is that between general and specific beneficence; and the approach from political philosophy has at (...)
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  43. Carl Knight (2011). Inequality, Avoidability, and Healthcare. Iyyun 60:72-88.
    This review article of Shlomi Segall's Health, Luck, and Justice (Princeton University Press, 2010) addresses three issues: first, Segall’s claim that luck egalitarianism, properly construed, does not object to brute luck equality; second, Segall’s claim that brute luck is properly construed as the outcome of actions that it would have been unreasonable to expect the agent to avoid; and third, Segall’s account of healthcare and criticism of rival views. On the first two issues, a more conventional form of luck egalitarianism (...)
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  44. Vic Larcher (2009). The Development and Function of Clinical Ethics Committees (CECs) in the United Kingdom. Diametros 22:47-63.
    In the UK an increasing number of Clinical Ethics Committees (CECs) have been developed mainly in response to local need and interest. Their functions include education of health professionals, of policy and guideline development, and case review (both retrospective analysis of topics and advice on acute cases). The UK Clinical Ethics Network, a charitable foundation provides CEC s with help, support and advice and enables them to share their experience The legal status of UK CECs is unclear but some legal (...)
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  45. Chiara Lepora & Joseph Millum (2011). The Tortured Patient: A Medical Dilemma. Hastings Center Report 41 (3):38-47.
    Torture is unethical and usually counterproductive. It is prohibited by international and national laws. Yet it persists: according to Amnesty International, torture is widespread in more than a third of countries. Physicians and other medical professionals are frequently asked to assist with torture. -/- Medical complicity in torture, like other forms of involvement, is prohibited both by international law and by codes of professional ethics. However, when the victims of torture are also patients in need of treatment, doctors can find (...)
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  46. Michele Loi (2012). Germ-Line Enhancements and Rough Equality. Ethical Perspectives 19 (1):55-82.
    Enhancements of the human germ-line introduce further inequalities in the competition for scarce goods, such as income and desirable social positions. Social inequalities, in turn, amplify the range of genetic inequalities that access to germ-line enhancements may produce. From an egalitarian point of view, inequalities can be arranged to the benefit of the worst-off group (for instance, through general taxation), but the possibility of an indefinite growth of social and genetic inequality raises legitimate concerns. It is argued that inequalities produced (...)
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  47. Stephen Macedo (ed.) (1999). Deliberative Politics: Essays on Democracy and Disagreement. Oxford University Press.
    The banner of deliberative democracy is attracting increasing numbers of supporters, in both the world's older and newer democracies. This effort to renew democratic politics is widely seen as a reaction to the dominance of liberal constitutionalism. But many questions surround this new project. What does deliberative democracy stand for? What difference would deliberative practices make in the real world of political conflict and public policy design? What is the relationship between deliberative politics and liberal constitutional arrangements? The 1996 publication (...)
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  48. Ignacio Mastroleo (forthcoming). Introducción al problema de la continuidad del tratamiento beneficioso para los sujetos de investigación. In Jorge Alberto Álvarez Díaz (ed.), Ensayos sobre ética de la salud. Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana - Unidad Xochimilco.
    ¿Qué ocurre con la continuidad del tratamiento de los sujetos de investigación después de que realizan la última visita del ensayo en el que participan? En algunos casos, la falta de continuidad de atención de la salud apropiada podría poner en peligro la salud de estas personas. Por lo tanto, es probable que los sujetos de investigación que al terminar su participación en un ensayo todavía se encuentran enfermos, necesiten continuar con el tratamiento en estudio u otra atención de la (...)
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  49. Ignacio Mastroleo (2014). Consideraciones sobre las obligaciones posinvestigación en la Declaración de Helsinki 2013. Revista de Bioética y Derecho 31:51-65.
    [RESUMEN] El problema de la transición de los participantes desde una investigación hacia la atención de la salud apropiada es un problema global. La publicación de una nueva versión de la Declaración de Helsinki es una excelente oportunidad para repensar este problema. Según mi interpretación, la Declaración de Helsinki 2013 introduce dos tipos diferentes de obligaciones posinvestigación, a saber, (1) obligaciones de acceso a atención de la salud y (2) obligaciones de acceso a información. Los beneficiarios pretendidos de estas obligaciones (...)
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  50. Ignacio Mastroleo (2012). Guías para los comités de ética de investigación del Reino Unido sobre atención de la salud después de la investigación: un comentario crítico sobre la traducción al español del borrador versión 8.0. Perspectivas Bioéticas 17 (33):71-81.
    [RESUMEN] Este trabajo es un comentario sobre la primera traducción al español de las guías del Reino Unido “Atención después de la investigación: un marco para los comités de ética de investigación del NHS (borrador versión 8.0)”. El comentario se divide en tres partes. En la primera parte, se busca resumir la información básica necesaria para mejorar la lectura comprensiva de la traducción de las guías. En la segunda parte, se analiza una selección de la normativa argentina que trata sobre (...)
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