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  1. Eliana Aaron (2013). Ethical Challenges in Refugee Health: A Global Public Health Concern. Hastings Center Report 43 (3).
  2. Elmer D. Abbo & Angelo E. Volandes (2006). Teaching Residents to Consider Costs in Medical Decision Making. American Journal of Bioethics 6 (4):33 – 34.
  3. Halpern Abraham, Halpern John & Doherty Sean (2008). " Enhanced" Interrogation of Detainees: Do Psychologists and Psychiatrists Participate? Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 3.
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  4. Desiree Abu-Odeh (2014). Fat Stigma and Public Health: A Theoretical Framework and Ethical Analysis. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 24 (3):247-265.
    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (2012), a drastic increase in the prevalence of overweight and obesity in the United States over the past 20 years constitutes an epidemic. The World Health Organization (2013) speaks of the global obesity epidemic, or “globesity,” as “taking over many parts of the world.” In the world of public health, obesity is understood to be a major health issue in need of immediate intervention.In attempts to address the obesity epidemic, public health (...)
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  5. George J. Agich (2009). The Issue of Expertise in Clinical Ethics. Diametros 22:3-20.
    The proliferation of ethics committees and ethics consultation services has engendered a discussion of the issue of the expertise of those who provide clinical ethics consultation services. In this paper, I discuss two aspects of this issue: the cognitive dimension or content knowledge that the clinical ethics consultant should possess and the practical dimension or set of dispositions, skills, and traits that are necessary for effective ethics consultation. I argue that the failure to differentiate and fully explicate these dimensions contributes (...)
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  6. A. Albertsen & C. Knight (forthcoming). A Framework for Luck Egalitarianism in Health and Healthcare. Journal of Medical Ethics.
    Several attempts have been made to apply the choice-sensitive theory of distributive justice, luck egalitarianism, in the context of health and healthcare. This article presents a framework for this discussion by highlighting different normative decisions to be made in such an application, some of the objections to which luck egalitarians must provide answers and some of the practical implications associated with applying such an approach in the real world. It is argued that luck egalitarians should address distributions of health rather (...)
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  7. Jess Alderman, Jason A. Smith, Ellen J. Fried & Richard A. Daynard (2007). Application of Law to the Childhood Obesity Epidemic. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 35 (1):90-112.
    Childhood obesity is in important respects a result of legal policies that influence both dietary intake and physical activity. The law must shift focus away from individual risk factors alone and seek instead to promote situational and environmental influences that create an atmosphere conducive to health. To attain this goal, advocates should embrace a population-wide model of public health, and policymakers must critically examine the fashionable rhetoric of consumer choice.
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  8. Susan M. Allan, Benjamin Mason Meier, Joan Miles, Gregg Underheim & Anne C. Haddix (2007). Why and How States Are Updating Their Public Health Laws. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 35 (s4):39-42.
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  9. Sudhir Anand, Fabienne Peter & Amartya Sen (eds.) (2004). Public Health, Ethics, and Equity. OUP.
    These are some of the important questions that this book addresses in building an interdisciplinary understanding of health equity. (Midwest).
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  10. Terry Andrus, William Cox, Bradford Gray, Cleve Killingsworth, Paula Steiner & Bruce McPherson (2008). Nonprofit Health Care Organizations and Universal Health Care Coverage. Inquiry 45 (1):7-14.
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  11. Jonny Anomaly (2012). Is Obesity a Public Health Problem? Public Health Ethics 5 (3):216-221.
    It is often claimed that there is an obesity epidemic in affluent countries, and that obesity is one of the most serious public health threats in the developed world. I will argue that obesity is not an 'epidemic' in any useful sense of the word, and that classifying it as a public health problem requires us to make fairly controversial moral and empirical assumptions. While evidence suggests that the prevalence of obesity is on the rise, and that obesity can lead (...)
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  12. Marco Azevedo (2013). Human Enhancement: A New Issue in Philosophical Agenda. Princípios. Revista de Filosofía 20 (33):265-303.
    Since before we can remember, humanity aims to overcome its biological limitations; such a goal has certainly played a key role in the advent of technique. However, despite the benefits that technique may bring, the people who make use of it will inevitably be under risk of harm. Even though human technical wisdom consists in attaining the best result without compromising anybody’s safety, misuses are always a possibility in the horizon. Nowadays, technology can be used for more than just improving (...)
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  13. Zbigniew Bańkowski & John H. Bryant (eds.) (1995). Poverty, Vulnerability, the Value of Human Life, and the Emergence of Bioethics: Highlights and Papers of the Xxviiith Cioms Conference, Ixtapa, Guerrero State, Mexico, 17-20 April 1994. [REVIEW] Cioms.
  14. Zbigniew Bańkowski, John H. Bryant & J. Gallagher (eds.) (1997). Ethics, Equity, and the Renewal of Who's Health-for-All Strategy: Proceedings of the Xxixth Cioms Conference, Geneva, Switzerland 12-14 March 1997. [REVIEW] Council for International Organizations of Medical Sciences (Cioms).
  15. Jason Behrmann (2010). Allergies And Asthma: Employing Principles Of Social Justice As A Guide In Public Health Policy Development. Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 5 (1):119-130.
    The growing epidemic of allergy and allergy-induced asthma poses a significant challenge to population health. This article, written for a target audience of policy-makers in public health, aims to contribute to the development of policies to counter allergy morbidities by demonstrating how principles of social justice can guide public health initiatives in reducing allergy and asthma triggers. Following a discussion of why theories of social justice have utility in analyzing allergy, a step-wise policy assessment protocol formulated on Rawlsian principles of (...)
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  16. Nora K. Bell (1989). Review: What Setting Limits May Mean: A Feminist Critique of Daniel Callahan's "Setting Limits". [REVIEW] Hypatia 4 (2):169 - 178.
    In Setting Limits, Daniel Callahan advances the provocative thesis that age be a limiting factor in decisions to allocate certain kinds of health services to the elderly. However, when one looks at available data, one discovers that there are many more elderly women than there are elderly men, and these older women are poorer, more apt to live alone, and less likely to have informal social and personal supports than their male counterparts. Older women, therefore, will make the heaviest demand (...)
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  17. Kathleen Berchelmann & Barbara Blechner (2002). Searching for Effectiveness: The Functioning of Connecticut Clinical Ethics Committees. Journal of Clinical Ethics 13 (2):131.
  18. J. Boyle (1996). Catholic Social Justice and Health Care Entitlement Packages. Christian Bioethics 2 (3):280-292.
    This paper explores the implications of Roman Catholic teachings on social justice and rights to health care. It argues that contemporary societies, such as those in North America and Western Europe, have an obligation to provide health care to their citizens as a matter of right. Moral considerations provide a basis for evaluating concerns about the role of equality when determining health care entitlements and giving some precision to the widespread belief that the right to health care requires equal entitlement (...)
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  19. Dan Brock (2002). Priority to the Worse Off in Health Care Resource Prioritization. In Margaret Battin (ed.), Medicine and Social Justice. Oxford University Press 373-389.
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  20. Dan W. Brock (1989). Review: Justice, Health Care, and the Elderly. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Public Affairs 18 (3):297 - 312.
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  21. Thom Brooks (2012). Preserving Capabilities. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (6):48-49.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 6, Page 48-49, June 2012.
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  22. Allen Buchanan (2009). Justice and Health Care: Selected Essays. OUP Usa.
    This book brings together ten influential essays on justice and healthcare, written by a major figure in bioethics and political philosophy. What emerges is a systematic and unified approach to the issues that challenges widely-held dogmas and unsettles the framing assumptions of a number of prominent debates. Unlike most work in bioethics, this book takes the problem of implementing justice seriously, exploring the relationship between institutions, incentives, and moral commitments.
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  23. Vanessa Carbonell (2014). How to Put Prescription Drug Ads on Your Syllabus. Teaching Philosophy 37 (3):295-319.
    The purpose of this essay is to make the case that the ethical issues raised by the current U.S. practice of direct-to-consumer prescription drug advertising are worthy of study in philosophy courses, and to provide instructors with some ideas for how they might approach teaching the topic, despite the current relative scarcity of philosophical literature published on it. This topic presents a unique opportunity to cover ground in ethics, critical thinking, and scientific literacy simultaneously. As a case study, the practice (...)
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  24. Jean-Claude Chevrolet & Bara Ricou (2009). Hospital Clinical Ethics Committees. The Geneva Experience - Switzerland. Diametros 22:21-38.
    Hospital ethics committees were created in the United States of America in the 1970s. Their aims were the education of the hospital personnel in the field of ethics, the development of policies and the publication of guidelines concerning ethical issues, as well as consultations and case reviews of hospitalized patients when an ethical concern was present. During the last thirty years, these committees disseminated, particularly in Western Europe. In this manuscript, we describe the benefit, but also some difficulties with these (...)
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  25. Silvia Colona & Irene Schipper, Post-Trial Access to Treatment: Corporate Best Practices. Pharmaceutical Industry.
    The paper Post-Trial Acces To Treatment (PTA) offers an insight into current corporate policies and corporate best practices relating to the provision of PTA in low and middle income countries based on company sources. In these countries there is a greater appeal for pharmaceutical companies to take responsibility for providing PTA. However, the practice of providing PTA is the exception rather than the rule.
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  26. Brian Cupples (1986). Norman Daniels, Just Health Care Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 6 (7):332-333.
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  27. Leonardo D. de Castro & Peter A. Sy (1998). Critical Care in the Philippines: The "Robin Hood Principle" Vs. Kagandahang Loob. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (6):563 – 580.
    Practical medical decisions are closely integrated with ethical and religious beliefs in the Philippines. This is shown in a survey of Filipino physicians' attitudes towards severely compromised neonates. This is also the reason why the ethical analysis of critical care practices must be situated within the context of local culture. Kagandahang loob and kusang loob are indigenous Filipino ethical concepts that provide a framework for the analysis of several critical care practices. The practice of taking-from-the-rich-to-give-to-the-poor in public hospitals is not (...)
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  28. Michel Désy (2010). Introduction: Pourquoi l’éthique de la santé publique devrait-elle s’intéresser à l’impact des politiques publiques sur la santé? Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 5 (1):101-104.
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  29. Peggye Dilworth-Anderson, Geraldine Pierre & Tandrea S. Hilliard (2012). Social Justice, Health Disparities, and Culture in the Care of the Elderly. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 40 (1):26-32.
    Older minority Americans experience worse health outcomes than their white counterparts, exhibiting the need for social justice in all areas of their health care. Justice, fairness, and equity are crucial to minimizing conditions that adversely affect the health of individuals and communities. In this paper, Alzheimer's disease (AD) is used as an example of a health care disparity among elderly Americans that requires social justice interventions. Cultural factors play a crucial role in AD screening, diagnosis, and access to care, and (...)
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  30. Andrea Dörries (2009). The 4-Step Approach. Ethics Case Discussion in Hospitals. Diametros 22:39-46.
    The goal of an ethics case discussion is to find the best decision for the patient and the other persons involved (relatives, doctors, nurses and others) from an ethical point of view, in a communicative respect and from a psychosocial view. In the end, it may not mean changing one’s view or even one’s own position, but rather to exchange arguments, weight them and come to a consensus as to further action. The latter is important as the topics concern patients (...)
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  31. Thomas Douglas (2009). Medical Injury Compensation: Beyond 'No-Fault'. Medical Law Review 17:30-51.
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  32. Speranta Dumitru (2010). Consentement présumé, famille et équité dans le don d'organes. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 3 (67):341-354.
    Cet article propose une évaluation éthique des institutions qui organisent la transplantation avec donneurs décédés, au travers du rôle qu’elles accordent à la famille survivante. Son objectif est double. Il s’agit, premièrement, de montrer que la famille possède un pouvoir de décision considérable en matière de prélèvement posthume bien que les législations soient habituellement décrites comme fondées sur le consentement ou l’opposition des personnes concernées. Deuxièmement, il s’agit de montrer que les politiques qui octroient un tel pouvoir aux familles manquent (...)
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  33. Jason T. Eberl, Eleanor K. Kinney & Matthew J. Williams (2011). Foundation for a Natural Right to Health Care. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (6):537-557.
    Discussions concerning whether there is a natural right to health care may occur in various forms, resulting in policy recommendations for how to implement any such right in a given society. But health care policies may be judged by international standards including the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The rights enumerated in the UDHR are grounded in traditions of moral theory, a philosophical analysis of which is necessary in order to adjudicate the value of specific policies designed to enshrine (...)
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  34. Daniel Engster (2014). The Social Determinants of Health, Care Ethics and Just Health Care. Contemporary Political Theory 13 (2):149-167.
    Political theorists generally defend the moral importance of health care by appealing to its purported importance in promoting good health and saving lives. Recent research on the social determinants of health demonstrates, however, that health care actually does relatively little to promote good health or save lives in comparison with other social and environmental factors. This article assesses the implications of the social determinants of health literature for existing theories of health care justice, and outlines a new approach that can (...)
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  35. John R. Evans (1993). International Challenges and Opportunities in Health. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 21 (1):10-15.
  36. N. Eyal (2012). Why Treat Noncompliant Patients? Beyond the Decent Minimum Account. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (6):572-588.
    Patients’ medical conditions can result from their own avoidable risk taking. Some lung diseases result from avoidable smoking and some traffic accidents result from victims’ reckless driving. Although in many nonmedical areas we hold people responsible for taking risks they could avoid, it is normally harsh and inappropriate to deny patients care because they risked needing it. Why? A popular account is that protecting everyone’s "decent minimum," their basic needs, matters more than the benefits of holding people accountable. This account (...)
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  37. Nir Eyal & Alex Voorhoeve (2011). Inequalities in HIV Care: Chances Versus Outcomes. American Journal of Bioethics 11 (12):42-44.
    We analyse three moral dilemmas involving resource allocation in care for HIV-positive patients. Ole Norheim and Kjell Arne Johansson have argued that these cases reveal a tension between egalitarian concerns and concerns for better population health. We argue, by contrast, that these cases reveal a tension between, on the one hand, a concern for equal *chances*, and, on the other hand, both a concern for better health and an egalitarian concern for equal *outcomes*. We conclude that, in these cases, there (...)
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  38. Ruth R. Faden, Liza Dawson, Alison S. Bateman‐House, Dawn Mueller Agnew, Hilary Bok, Dan W. Brock, Aravinda Chakravarti, Xiao‐Jiang Gao, Mark Greene, John A. Hansen, Patricia A. King, Stephen J. O'Brien, David H. Sachs, Kathryn E. Schill, Andrew Siegel, Davor Solter, Sonia M. Suter, Catherine M. Verfaillie, Leroy B. Walters & John D. Gearhart (2003). Public Stem Cell Banks: Considerations of Justice in Stem Cell Research and Therapy. Hastings Center Report 33 (6):13-27.
    If stem cell-based therapies are developed, we will likely confront a difficult problem of justice: for biological reasons alone, the new therapies might benefit only a limited range of patients. In fact, they might benefit primarily white Americans, thereby exacerbating long-standing differences in health and health care.
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  39. Ruth Faden & Madison Powers (2013). Biotechnology, Justice and Health. Journal of Practical Ethics 1 (1):49-61.
    New biotechnologies have the potential to both dramatically improve human well-being and dramatically widen inequalities in well-being. This paper addresses a question that lies squarely on the fault line of these two claims: When as a matter of justice are societies obligated to include a new biotechnology in a national healthcare system? This question is approached from the standpoint of a twin aim theory of justice, in which social structures, including nation-states, have double-barreled theoretical objectives with regard to human well-being. (...)
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  40. Lisa Fuller (2006). Justified Commitments? Considering Resource Allocation and Fairness in Médecins Sans Frontières-Holland. Developing World Bioethics 6 (2):59–70.
    Non-governmental aid programs are an important source of health care for many people in the developing world. Despite the central role non-governmental organizations (NGOs) play in the delivery of these vital services, for the most part they either lack formal systems of accountability to their recipients altogether, or have only very weak requirements in this regard. This is because most NGOs are both self-mandating and self-regulating. What is needed in terms of accountability is some means by which all the relevant (...)
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  41. Edward J. Furton (2012). Is There a Future for Universal Health Care? The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 12 (1):27-35.
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  42. Eugenijus Gefenas (2011). Clinical Ethics Committees and Ethics Support Infrastructure: A European Perspective. Asian Bioethics Review 3 (3):293-298.
  43. Azam Golam (2010). Distribution of Health Care Resources in LIC: A Utilitarian Approach. VDM Verlag Dr. Müller.
    Distribution of sufficient health care resources to the maximum number of people in LIC is the central theme of the book. Bangladesh is taken as a representative of low income countries (LIe. In LIC, there is scarcity of health care resources like other resources but the deserving persons are numerous. Therefore, it requires an efficient distribution of resources. Considering 'Inequality to get access to health care' as the basic problem in LIC, John Rawls' principle of fair equality of opportunity is (...)
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  44. Azam Golam (2008). Moral Obligation of Pharmaceutical Companies Towards HIV Victims in Developing Countries. The Dhaka University Studies 64 (1):197-212.
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  45. Azam Golam (2008). Rawls’ Theory of Distributive Justice and the Role of Informal Institutions in Giving People Access to Health Care in Bangladesh. Philosophy and Progress 41 (2):151-167.
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  46. Azam Golam (2007). Moral Permissibility of Euthanasia: A Case Discussion From Bangladesh. The Dhaka University Studies 63 (2):157-169.
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  47. Maya J. Goldenberg (2012). Defining Quality of Care Persuasively. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (4):243-261.
    As the quality movement in health care now enters its fourth decade, the language of quality is ubiquitous. Practitioners, organizations, and government agencies alike vociferously testify their commitments to quality and accept numerous forms of governance aimed at improving quality of care. Remarkably, the powerful phrase ‘‘quality of care’’ is rarely defined in the health care literature. Instead it operates as an accepted and assumed goal worth pursuing. The status of evidence-based medicine, for instance, hinges on its ability to improve (...)
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  48. Mark Greene & Steven Augello (2011). Everworse: What's Wrong with Selecting for Disability? Public Affairs Quarterly 25 (2):131-140.
    In this paper we challenge the moral consensus against selection for disability. Our discussion will concern only those disabilities that are compatible with a life worth living from the point of view of the disabled individual. We will argue that an influential, impersonal argument against selection for disability falls to a counterexample. We will then show how the reach of the counterexample can be broadened to make trouble for anyone who objects to selection for disability. If we are right about (...)
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  49. Kalle Grill (2013). Normative and Non-Normative Concepts: Paternalism and Libertarian Paternalism. In Daniel Strech, Irene Hirschberg & Georg Marckmann (eds.), Ethics in Public Health and Health Policy. Springer 27-46.
    This chapter concerns the normativity of the concepts of paternalism and libertarian paternalism. The first concept is central in evaluating public health policy, but its meaning is controversial. The second concept is equally controversial and has received much attention recently. It may or may not shape the future evaluation of public health policy. In order to facilitate honest and fruitful debate, I consider three approaches to these concepts, in terms of their normativity. Concepts, I claim, may be considered nonnormative, normatively (...)
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  50. Alexander A. Guerrero (2013). Coercion, Political Accountability, and Voter Ignorance: The Mistaken Medicaid Expansion Ruling in Nfib V. Sebelius. Public Affairs Quarterly 27 (3).
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