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Summary This category includes works on the philosophical schools of the Hellenistic period (the Stoics, Skeptics and Epicureans). It also includes the philosophy of late antiquity. While the works of Plato and Aristotle were largely eclipsed in the Hellenistic period, the practice of commenting upon these authors dominates the philosophy of late antiquity (200-600 CE). Neoplatonists wrote commentaries on both, since they regarded Aristotle himself as a somewhat heterodox Platonist. They read Aristotle as an introduction to Plato. Other authors of commentaries, such as Alexander of Aphrodisias, identified as Aristotelians without this admixture of Platonism.
Key works Long & Sedley 1987 provides the most widely used English translation of our evidence on the Hellenistic philosophers. The following collections of articles were seminal in establishing Hellenistic philosophy as an important sub-field in ancient philosophy: Schofield et al 1980,  Barnes 1982Schofield & Striker 1986, and Brunschwig & Nussbaum 1993. The standard reference work is Algra 2005. Boys-Stones 2001 provides one (admittedly controversial) account of the transition from the Hellenistic schools to a post-Hellenistic period dominated by Platonism. Sorabji 2005 provides key extracts from voluminous writings of the Aristotelian and Neoplatonist commentators of late antiquity.
Introductions Long 1986 is a classic introduction to Hellenistic philosophy. Brennan 2005 is a lively introduction to Stoic ethics. Dillon 1977 provides a short overview of the Platonists up to Plotinus. O'Meara 1993 is a gentle introduction to Plotinus. For a wider look at the Neoplatonists, Wallis 1972 is the early classic. Tuominen 2012 provides a survey of the commentary tradition, with more emphasis on Aristotelians.
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Peripatetics
  1. Alexander (2001). Alexander of Aphrodisias on the Cosmos. Brill Academic Pub.
    This volume contains the Arabic translations of a lost treatise by Alexander of Aphrodisias (c. AD 200) "On the Principles of the Universe" with English translation, introduction and commentary. It also includes an Arabic and Syriac glossary. The introduction and commentary deal in detail with the manuscripts, the translators and the exegetical tendencies of the text, as well as with its reception in Arabic philosophy. The main theme of the work is the motion of the heavenly bodies and their influence (...)
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  2. Alexander (1983). Alexander of Aphrodisias on Fate: Text, Translation, and Commentary. Duckworth.
  3. Keimpe Algra (ed.) (2005). The Cambridge History of Hellenistic Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    A full account of the philosophy of the Greek and Roman worlds from the last days of Aristotle (c. 320 BC) until 100 BC. Hellenistic philosophy, for long relatively neglected and unappreciated, has over the last decade been the object of a considerable amount of scholarly attention. Now available in paperback, this volume is the first general reference work to pull the subject together and present an overview. The time has come for a general reference work which pulls the subject (...)
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  4. Keimpe Algra (2005). Aristotle and the Aristotelian Tradition. [REVIEW] Phronesis 50 (3):250 - 261.
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  5. Keimpe Algra (2004). Hellenistic and Early Imperial Philosophy. [REVIEW] Phronesis 49 (2):202-217.
  6. Keimpe Algra (2001). Review: Aristotle and Hellenistic Philosophy. [REVIEW] Phronesis 46 (1):93 - 104.
  7. Keimpe Algra (2000). Hellenistic Philosophy. [REVIEW] Phronesis 45 (1):77 - 86.
  8. Keimpe Algra (1998). Aristotle and Hellenistic Philosophy. [REVIEW] Phronesis 43 (4):351 - 359.
  9. Alexander of Aphrodisias (1992). Quaestiones 1.1--2.15. Cornell University Press.
    trans. R. W. Sharples. Alexander addresses a number of questions drawn from a range of topics in Aristotle's works.
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  10. C. F. B. (1974). Aristotle's School. Review of Metaphysics 27 (3):619-620.
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  11. Jonathan Barnes & Miriam T. Griffin (eds.) (1997). Philosophia Togata. Oxford University Press.
    The mutual interaction of philosophy and Roman political and cultural life has aroused more and more interest in recent years among students of classical literature, Roman history, and ancient philosophy. In this volume, which gathers together some of the papers originally delivered at a series of seminars in the University of Oxford, scholars from all three disciplines explore the role of Platonism and Aristotelianism in Roman intellectual, cultural, and political life from the second century BC to the third century AD.
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  12. Edwyn Robert Bevan (1927/1973). Later Greek Religion. [New York,Ams Press.
    The early Stoics: Zeno of Citium. Persaeus of Citium. Cleanthes of Assos. Chrysippus of Soli. Aratus of Soli. Antipater of Tarsus. Boëthus of Sidon.--Epicurus.--The school of Aristotle: the Peripatetics (Theophrastus).--The Sceptics.--Deification of kings and emperors.--Sarapis.--The historians: Polybius. Diodorus of Sicily.--Posidonius.--Popular religion.--Philo of Alexandria.--The Stoics of the Roman Empire: Musonius Rufus. Cornutus. Epictetus. Dio (Chrysostom) of Prusa. Marcus Aurelius.--Second-century Platonists: Plutarch. Maximus of Tyre. Numenius.--Second-century believers: Pausanias. Aelius Aristides.--Second-century scepticism (Lucian of Samosata).--The hermetic writings.--Gnosticism (Valentius).--Neoplatonism: Plotinus. Porphyry. Iamblichus. Christian criticism.--The last (...)
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  13. M. F. Burnyeat (1980). Fritz Wehrli: Sotion. (Die Schule des Aristoteles, Texte Und Kommentar, Supplementband 2.) Pp. 71. Basel-Stuttgart: Schwabe, 1978. Paper, 38Sw.Frs. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 30 (01):150-.
  14. S. F. (2000). Juha Sihvola and Troels Engberg-Pedersen the Emotions in Hellenistic Philosophy. New Synthese Historical Library, 46. (Dordrecht: Kluwer, 1998). Pp. XII + 380. £116·00, US×184·00 (Hbk). ISBN 0792353188. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 36 (4):505-507.
  15. S. F. (2000). Keimpe Algra, Jonathan Barnes, Jaap Mansfeld and Malcolm Schofield (Eds) the Cambridge History of Hellenistic Philosophy. (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999). Pp. XIX + 916. £80·00 (Hbk). ISBN 0 521 250285. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 36 (4):505-507.
  16. David J. Furley (ed.) (1999). From Aristotle to Augustine. Routledge.
    This offering in Routledge's acclaimed History of Philosophy series completes the acclaimed 10-volume collection. This work explores the schools of thought that developed in the wake of Platonism through the time of Augustine. The 11 separately authored in-depth articles include: Aristotle the scientist-- David Furley, Princeton University; Aristotle: logic and metaphysics-- Alan Code, Ohio State University; Aristotle: aesthetics and philosophy of mind -- David Gallop, Trent University, Ontario; Aristotle: ethics and politics-- Stephen White, University of Texas at Austin; The peripatetic (...)
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  17. H. B. Gottschalk (1976). Aristotle's School. The Classical Review 26 (01):70-.
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  18. H. B. Gottschalk (1973). Addenda Peripatetica. Phronesis 18 (1):91-100.
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  19. Felix Grayeff (1974). Aristotle and His School. [London]Duckworth.
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  20. Gweltaz Guyomarc'H. (2008). Le visage du divin : la forme pure selon Alexandre d'Aphrodise. Les Etudes Philosophiques 3 (3):323-341.
    In his De anima, Alexander of Aphrodisias identifies the active intellect with the first mover and describes this “first cause” as an immaterial and separate form. In this article, we try to explain the differences between Aristotle and Alexander on this point. Aristotle never defines the first mover as a form but claims that its being is actuality. How is it possible for Alexander, well known for being “the Commentator par excellence”, to assert such a thesis which seems dangerously close (...)
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  21. G. B. Kerferd (1959). The School of Aristotle Fritz Wehrli: Phainias von Eresos, Chamaileon, Praxiphanes. (Die Schule des Aristoteles, Heft Ix.) Pp. 115. Basel: Schwabe, 1957. Paper, 16 Sw. Fr. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 9 (02):130-131.
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  22. Jaap Mansfeld (1997). Aëtiana: The Method and Intellectual Context of a Doxographer. E.J. Brill.
    v. 1. The sources -- v. 2., pt. 2. The compendium -- v. 3. Studies in the doxographical traditions of ancient philosophy.
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  23. Jon McGinnis (2006). Positioning Heaven: The Infidelity of a Faithful Aristotelian. Phronesis 51 (2):140 - 161.
    Aristotle's account of place in terms of an innermost limit of a containing body was to generate serious discussion and controvery among Aristotle's later commentators, especially when it was applied to the cosmos as a whole. The problem was that since there is nothing outside of the cosmos that could contain it, the cosmos apparently could not have a place according to Aristotle's definition; however, if the cosmos does not have a place, then it is not clear that it could (...)
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  24. A. C. Pearson (1909). De Hermino Peripatetico (diss. inaug.). Henricus Schmidt. Marburg: Bauer. 1907. Pp. 46. 8½″ × 5½″. The Classical Review 23 (02):57-58.
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Theophrastus
  1. D. J. Allan (1937). Oikeiosis F. Dirlmeier: Die Oikeiosis–Lehre Theophrasts.(Philologus, Supplementband XXX, Heft 1.) Pp. 100. Leipzig: Dieterich, 1937. Paper, M. 5.80 (Bound, 7.30). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 51 (05):178-179.
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  2. Clifford Allbutt (1918). Theophrastus and the Greek Physiological Psychology Before Aristotle Theophrastus and the Greek Physiological Psychology Before Aristotle. By George Malcolm Stratton, Professor of Psychology in the University of California. London and New York, 1917. The Classical Review 32 (5-6):117-120.
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  3. Clifford Allbutt (1918). Theophrastus' Scientific Enquiries Theophrastus' Enquiry Into Plants and Minor Works on Odours and Weather Signs. With an English Translation by Sir Arthur Hort, Bart., M.A. 12mo. Two Vols.: I. Xxviii+475; II. Ix + 499. Portrait Bust of Theophrastus. London : Heinemann ; New York: G. P. Putnam's Sons. MCMXVI. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 32 (1-2):36-38.
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  4. D. M. Balme (1962). Development of Biology in Aristotle and Theophrastus: Theory of Spontaneous Generation. Phronesis 7 (1):91 - 104.
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  5. H. Baltussen (2013). W.W. Fortenbaugh Theophrastus of Eresus. Commentary Volume 6.1. Sources on Ethics. With Contributions on the Arabic Material by Dimitri Gutas. (Philosophia Antiqua 123.) Pp. Xii + 879. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2011. Cased, €196, US$278. ISBN: 978-90-04-19422-9. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 63 (1):66-68.
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  6. H. Baltussen (2000). Theophrastus Against the Presocratics and Plato: Peripatetic Dialectic in the De Sensibus. Brill.
    This study offers a new and stimulating interpretation of Theophrastus' "De sensibus, a treatise unique in content and method, as it reports and criticizes the ...
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  7. Han Baltussen & R. W. Sharples (2000). Theophrastus of Eresus: Sources for His Life, Writings, Thought and Influence. Commentary Vol. 3.1, Sources on Physics. Journal of Hellenic Studies 120:169.
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  8. J. D. Beazley (1949). Theophrastus, Characters, 21. 6. The Classical Review 63 (02):42-43.
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  9. N. Ben (1987). Theophrastus, De Vertigine, Ch. 9, and Heraclitus Fr. 125. American Journal of Philology 109 (3):397-401.
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  10. Elizabeth Bobrick, Theophrastus, Herodas, Cercidas, J. Rusten, I. C. Cunningham & A. D. Knox (1995). CharactersMimes. Journal of Hellenic Studies 115:208.
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  11. Susanne Bobzien (2002). Pre-Stoic Hypothetical Syllogistic in Galen. The Bulletin of the Institute of Classical Studies:57-72.
    ABSTRACT: This paper traces the evidence in Galen's Introduction to Logic (Institutio Logica) for a hypothetical syllogistic which predates Stoic propositional logic. It emerges that Galen is one of our main witnesses for such a theory, whose authors are most likely Theophrastus and Eudemus. A reconstruction of this theory is offered which - among other things - allows to solve some apparent textual difficulties in the Institutio Logica.
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  12. Susanne Bobzien (2000). Why the Order of the Figures of the Hypothetical Syllogisms Was Changed. Classical Quarterly 50 (01):247-.
    ABSTRACT: At the turn of the second century AD there existed two different views on the ordering of the figures of the (wholly) hypothetical syllogisms. One goes back to Theophrastus, whereas the other (adopted e.g. by Alexander of Aphrodisias and Alcinous) seems to have been the result of a later change. This reversal of the order of figures has so far not received a satisfactory explanation. In this paper I show how it came about.
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  13. E. Kerr Borthwick (1994). R. G. Ussher (Ed.): The Characters of Theophrastus: Introduction, Commentary and Index. Pp. Xiii+330. London: Bristol Classical Press, 1993. Paper, £14.95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 44 (01):203-.
  14. Luis Andrés Bredlow (2011). Aristotle, Theophrastus, and Parmenides' Theory of Cognition (B 16). Apeiron 44 (3):219-263.
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  15. R. A. Browne (1948). Theophrastus, Char. 4, 10. The Classical Review 62 (3-4):113-114.
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  16. C. W. Brunschön & David Sider (eds.) (2006). Theophrastus of Eresus: On Weather Signs. Brill.
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  17. Edward P. Butler (2012). Theophrastus On First Principles. Ancient Philosophy 32 (1):211-213.
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  18. M. C., O. Immisch, W. R. Paton, M. Pohlenz, W. Sieveking, W. D. Ross, F. H. Fobes, Theophrastus, Jules Herbillon, John Burnet, J. C. Vollebregt, G. Soyter, E. B. Stebbins, Hans Lewy, K. Reinhardt & C. N. Cochrane (1930). Aristotelis PoliticaPlutarchi Moralia. Vol. IIITheophrastus: MetaphysicsLes Cultes de PatrasEssays and AddressesSymbola in Novam Eunapii Vitarum EditionemByzantinische Geschichtschreiber Und ChronistenThe Dolphin in the Literature and Art of Greece and RomeSobria EbrietasKosmos Und Sympathie. Journal of Hellenic Studies 50:175.
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  19. Joseph T. Clark (1952). Theophrastus and Hypothetical Syllogisms. Philosophical Studies of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 3:22-23.
  20. Joseph T. Clark (1952). Theophrastus on Quantification. Philosophical Studies of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 3:19-22.
  21. Raul Corazzon, Peripatetic Logic: Eudemus of Rhodes and Theophrastus of Eresus.
    “Aristotle's successor as director of the Lyceum was Theophrastus, his friend and disciple; Eudemus, another of the Stagirite's important disciples should also be mentioned. Other philosophers belonging to the Peripatetic school were: Aristoxenus, Dikaiarchos, Phanias, Straton, Duris, Chamaeleon, Lycon, Hieronymus, Ariston, Critolaus, Phormio, Sotion, Hermippus, Satyrus and others. Straton even succeeded Theophrastus as director of the Lyceum but his name and those of the other Peripatetics of Aristotle's old school should not be considered in a history of logic as they (...)
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  22. Gustavo Costa (1983). Theophrastus Redivivus. New Vico Studies 1:126-128.
  23. John Dillon (1994). Theophrastus of Eresus: Sources for His Life, Writings, Thought & Influence. Ancient Philosophy 14 (2):431-433.
  24. J. M. E., Theophrastus & Otto Immisch (1926). Theophrasti Characteres. Journal of Hellenic Studies 46:129.
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  25. J. M. Edmonds (1910). Two Editions of the Characters of Theophrastvs Theophrasti Characteres Recensuit Hermannus Diels. Oxford Classical Texts. 1909. 3s. 6d. Net. Pp. Xxviii + (Unnumbered). Θεοφρστου Xαρακτρες. The Characters of Theophrastus. An English Translation From a Revised Text. With Introduction and Notes by R. C. Jebb, M.A. A New Edition. Edited by J. E. Sandys, Litt.D. Macmillan. 1909. 7s. 6d. Net. C. 23×14½. Pp. Xvi+229. [REVIEW] Classical Quarterly 4 (02):128-.
  26. D. E. Eichholz (1978). Theophrastus, De Causis Plantarum B. Einarson, G. K. K. Link: Theophrastus, De Causis Plantarum I. (Loeb Classical Library.) Pp. Lxvii + 361. London and Cambridge, Mass.; W. Heinemann and Harvard University Press, 1976. Cloth, £2·95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (01):12-14.
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