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  1. J. B. Brown (1980). The 'Opera Omnia' of Henry of Ghent. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 27:286-290.
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  2. Wouter Goris (2011). Two-Staged Doctrines of God as First Known and the Transformation of the Concept of Reality in Bonaventure and Henry of Ghent. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 85 (1):77-97.
    The medieval doctrine of God as first known presents a privileged moment in a tradition of classical metaphysics that runs from Plato to Levinas. The presentcontribution analyzes two versions of this doctrine formulated by Bonaventure († 1274) and Henry of Ghent († 1293). In reaction to the preceding discussion inParis, they advance a doctrine of God as first known that distinguishes the relative priority of God within the first known transcendental concepts from the absolutepriority of God over these. Although their (...)
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  3. Henry (2005). Henry of Ghent's Summa: The Questions on God's Existence and Essence, (Articles 21-24). Peeters.
  4. Thomas M. Osborne Jr (2005). Love of God and Love of Self in Thirteenth-Century Ethics. University of Notre Dame Press.
  5. Jt Paasch (2012). Divine Production in Late Medieval Trinitarian Theology: Henry of Ghent, Duns Scotus, and William Ockham. Oxford University Press.
    According to the doctrine of the Trinity, the Father, Son, and Spirit are supposed to be distinct from each other, and yet be one and the same God. As if that were not perplexing enough, there is also supposed to be an internal process of production that gives rise to the Son and Spirit: the Son is said to be 'begotten' by the Father, while the Spirit is said to 'proceed' either from the Father and the Son together, or from (...)
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  6. Robert Pasnau (1995). Henry of Ghent and the Twilight of Divine Illumination. Review of Metaphysics 49 (1):49 - 75.
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  7. Michael E. Rombeiro (2011). Intelligible Species in the Mature Thought of Henry of Ghent. Journal of the History of Philosophy 49 (2):181-220.
    There has been a renewed interest of late in the thought of Henry of Ghent.1 Scholars have recognized that Henry was an influential figure at the University of Paris in the late-thirteenth century and that his influence extended well past his own generation. It is also widely acknowledged that Henry's thought developed significantly over the span of his career.2 The critical edition of Henry's works has proven to be crucial in assessing this development.3 Nonetheless there is little consensus on the (...)
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  8. T. M. Rudavsky (2005). A Re-Examination of Henry of Ghent's Criticisms in Light of His Predecessors. Modern Schoolman 82 (2):101-109.
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  9. Joke Spruyt (2011). Henry of Ghent on Teaching Theology. Vivarium 49 (1-3):165-183.
    This paper aims to explain Henry of Ghent's views on what kind of language is appropriate in theology, and why. It concentrates on a number of questions of the Summa quaestionum ordinariarum , which are devoted to his take on how theologians should explain their discipline to students, and to the meaningfulness in general of theological language. The paper delves into the technical terms sensus and insinuare , and compares Henry's account with H.P. Grice's views on (speaker-)meaning and his notion (...)
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  10. Roland J. Teske (2007). Some Aspects of Henry of Ghent's Debt to Avicenna's Metaphysics. Modern Schoolman 85 (1):51 - 70.
    The paper explores three areas in which Avicenna had an important influence on the metaphysics of Henry of Ghent: first, in developing an argument for the existence of God in metaphysics rather than in physics; secondly, in his intentional distinction between essence and existence; and thirdly, in his arguments not merely that there is only one God, but that it is impossible for there to be many gods, his arguments which Henry clearly took from books one and eight of Avicenna’s (...)
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  11. Scott M. Williams (2010). Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Henry of Ghent, and John Duns Scotus: On the Theology of the Father's Intellectual Generation of the Word. Recherches de Theologie Et Philosophie Medievales 77 (1):35-81.
    There are two general routes that Augustine suggests in De Trinitate, XV, 14-16, 23-25, for a psychological account of the Father's intellectual generation of the Word. Thomas Aquinas and Henry of Ghent, in their own ways, follow the first route; John Duns Scotus follows the second. Aquinas, Henry, and Scotus's psychological accounts entail different theological opinions. For example, Aquinas (but neither Henry nor Scotus) thinks that the Father needs the Word to know the divine essence. If we compare the theological (...)
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  12. Gordon Wilson (1993). Henry of Ghent's Quodlibet VII as a Source for Richard of Mediavilla's Quaestio Privilegii Papae Martini. Franciscan Studies 53 (1):97-120.
  13. Gordon A. Wilson (1989). Thomas Aquinas and Henry of Ghent on the Succession of Substantial Forms and the Origin of Human Life. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 63:117-131.
  14. Gordon Anthony Wilson (ed.) (2010). A Companion to Henry of Ghent. Brill.
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