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  1. Tyson Anderson (1985). Wittgenstein and Nāgārjuna's Paradox. Philosophy East and West 35 (2):157-169.
  2. Dan Arnold (2008). Dharmakīrti's Dualism: Critical Reflections on a Buddhist Proof of Rebirth. Philosophy Compass 3 (5):1079-1096.
    Dharmakīrti, elaborating one of the Buddhist tradition's most complete defenses of rebirth, advanced some of this tradition's most explicitly formulated arguments for mind-body dualism. At the same time, Dharmakīrti himself may turn out to be vulnerable to some of the same kinds of arguments pressed against physicalists. It is revealing, then, that in arguing against physicalism himself, Dharmakīrti does not have available to him what some would judge to be more promising arguments for dualism (arguments, in particular, following Kant's 2nd (...)
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  3. L. Stafford Betty (1984). Is Nāgārjuna a Philosopher? Response to Professor Loy. Philosophy East and West 34 (4):447-450.
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  4. L. Stafford Betty (1983). Nāgārjuna's Masterpiece: Logical, Mystical, Both, or Neither? Philosophy East and West 33 (2):123-138.
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  5. Ewing Chinn (2001). Nagarjuna's Fundamental Principle Of. Philosophy East and West 51 (1).
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  6. Franklin Edgerton (1949). Pali and AMg. Bondi, BHS Vṛndi, 'Body'. Journal of the American Oriental Society 69 (4):229.
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  7. Jay L. Garfield (2001). Nagarjuna's Theory of Causality: Implications Sacred and Profane. Philosophy East and West 51 (4):507-524.
    Nāgārjuna argues for the fundamental importance of causality, and dependence more generally, to our understanding of reality and of human life: his account of these matters is generally correct. First, his account of interdependence shows how we can clearly understand the nature of scientific explanation, the relationship between distinct levels of theoretical analysis in the sciences (with particular attention to cognitive science), and how we can sidestep difficulties in understanding the relations between apparently competing ontologies induced by levels of description (...)
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  8. Jay L. Garfield (1994). Dependent Arising and the Emptiness of Emptiness: Why Did Nāgārjuna Start with Causation? Philosophy East and West 44 (2):219-250.
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  9. Jay L. Garfield & Graham Priest (2003). Nagarjuna and the Limits of Thought. Philosophy East and West 53 (1):1-21.
    : Nagarjuna seems willing to embrace contradictions while at the same time making use of classic reductio arguments. He asserts that he rejects all philosophical views including his own-that he asserts nothing-and appears to mean it. It is argued here that he, like many philosophers in the West and, indeed, like many of his Buddhist colleagues, discovers and explores true contradictions arising at the limits of thought. For those who share a dialetheist's comfort with the possibility of true contradictions commanding (...)
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  10. Pradeep P. Gokhale (1993). The Cārvāka Theory of Pramāṇas: A Restatement. Philosophy East and West 43 (4):675-682.
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  11. R. D. Gunaratne (1986). Understanding Nāgārjuna's Catuṣkoṭi. Philosophy East and West 36 (3):213-234.
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  12. Róbert H. Haraldsson, Salvör Nordal & Vilhjálmur Árnason (eds.) (2005). Hugsað Með Páli: Ritgerðir Til Heiðurs Páli Skúlasyni Sextugum. Háskólaútgáfan.
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  13. P. Harvey (2009). The Approach to Knowledge and Truth in the Therav Ā da Record of the Discourses of the Buddha; Therav Ā da Philosophy of Mind and the Person; Therav Ā da Texts on Ethics. In Jay Garfield & William Edelgass (eds.), Buddhist Philosophy: Essential Readings. Oup Usa. 175--85.
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  14. Frank J. Hoffman (1994). Review of Bruce Reichenbach, The Law of Karma. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 35.
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  15. Padmanabh S. Jaini (2003). Cdtuydma-Samvara in the Pali Canon. In Piotr Balcerowicz (ed.), Essays in Jaina Philosophy and Religion. Motilal Banarsidass Publishers. 20--119.
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  16. Richard Hubert Jones (1978). The Nature and Function of Nāgārjuna's Arguments. Philosophy East and West 28 (4):485-502.
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  17. Goran Kardaš (2013). Patisambhidāmagga Kao Rano Egzegetsko Djelo Theravādskog Buddhizma. Filozofska Istrazivanja 33 (1):139-150.
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  18. David Loy (1984). How Not to Criticize Nāgārjuna: A Response to L. Stafford Betty. Philosophy East and West 34 (4):437-445.
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  19. I. W. Mabbett (1984). Nāgārjuna and Zeno on Motion. Philosophy East and West 34 (4):401-420.
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  20. Ian Mabbett (1998). The Problem of the Historical Nāgārjuna Revisited. Journal of the American Oriental Society 118 (3):332-346.
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  21. Ian W. Mabbett (1995). Nāgārjuna and Deconstruction. Philosophy East and West 45 (2):203-225.
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  22. Edmund Perry (1997). Theravāda Transformed? [REVIEW] Journal of the American Oriental Society 117 (2):339-342.
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  23. Steven Piker (1993). Theravada Buddhism and Catholicism: A Social Historical Perspective on Religious Change, with Special Reference Tocentesimus Annus. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 12 (12):965 - 973.
    Centesimus Annus raises the issue of the relationship of religion to practical conduct. This paper constructs the issue; illustrates the construction with materials from Theravada Buddhist cultures; and applies the construction toCentesimus Annus. This is an exercise in social history.
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  24. Frank Purcell (1987). Nagarjuna. International Philosophical Quarterly 27 (1):113-114.
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  25. Richard H. Robinson (1972). Did Nāgārjuna Really Refute All Philosophical Views? Philosophy East and West 22 (3):325-331.
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  26. Richard H. Robinson (1957). Some Logical Aspects of Nāgārjuna's System. Philosophy East and West 6 (4):291-308.
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  27. George Rupp (1971). The Relationship Between Nirvāna and Samsāra: An Essay on the Evolution of Buddhist Ethics. Philosophy East and West 21 (1):55-67.
  28. Paul T. Sagal (1992). Nagarjuna's "Paradox". American Philosophical Quarterly 29 (1):79 - 85.
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  29. John Schroeder (2000). Nāgārjuna and the Doctrine of "Skillful Means". Philosophy East and West 50 (4):559-583.
    The role of "skillful means" is examined in relation to the important Mahāyāna philosopher Nāgārjuna, and it is argued that the doctrine of "emptiness" is best understood as a critical reflection on the nature of Buddhist praxis. Whereas traditional Western scholarship sees Nāgārjuna as struggling with certain metaphysical problems, a "skillful means" reading situates his philosophy within a debate about the nature and efficacy of Buddhist practice. Thus, a "skillful means" reading of Nāgārjuna does not ask what it means for (...)
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  30. Martin Sevilla Rodriguez (2000). El sofisma de los tres tiempos en Nagarjuna, el Nyayasutra y Sexto Empirico. Teorema 19 (1):93-104.
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  31. Dakshinaranjan Shastri (1967). Charvaka Philosophy. Calcutta, Purogami Prakashani.
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  32. M. Siderits (2010). Nagarjuna's Madhyamaka: A Philosophical Introduction, by Jan Westerhoff. Mind 119 (475):864-867.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  33. Mark Siderits & J. Dervin O'Brien (1976). Zeno and Nāgārjuna on Motion. Philosophy East and West 26 (3):281-299.
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  34. Ives Waldo (1978). Nāgārjuna and Analytic Philosophy, II. Philosophy East and West 28 (3):287-298.
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  35. Ives Waldo (1975). Nāgārjuna and Analytic Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 25 (3):281-290.
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  36. Alex Wayman (2005). Remarks on Nagarjuna's Dates and Philosophical Position. In G. Kamalakar & M. Veerender (eds.), Buddhism: Art, Architecture, Literature & Philosophy. Sharada Pub. House. 1--15.
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  37. Alex Wayman (1977). Who Understands the Four Alternatives of the Buddhist Texts? Philosophy East and West 27 (1):3-21.
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  38. J. Westerhoff (2006). Nāgārjuna's Ṣkoṭ. Journal of Indian Philosophy 34 (4):367-395.
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  39. Zhihua Yao (2008). Some Mahāsāṃghika Arguments for the Cognition of Nonexistent Objects. Journal of Indian Council of Philosophical Research 25 (3):79-96.
    The present paper explores some pre-Vibhāṣika sources including the Kathāvatthu, *Śāriputrābhidharma, and Vijñānakāya. These sources suggest an early origin of the concept of the cognition of nonexistent objects (asad-ālambana-jñāna) among the Mahāsāṃghikas and some of its sub-schools. These scattered sources also indicate some different aspects of this theory from that held by the Dārṣṭāntikas and the Sautrāntikas. In particular, some Mahāsāṃghika arguments for the cognition of nonexistent objects reveal how a soteriologically-oriented issue gradually develops into a sophisticated philosophical concept.
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Theravada Buddhist Philosophy
  1. Martin T. Adam (2008). Classes of Agent and the Moral Logic of the Pali Canon. Argumentation 22 (1):115-124.
    This paper aims to lay bare the underlying logical structure of early Buddhist moral thinking. It argues that moral vocabulary in the Pali Suttas varies depending on the kind of agent under discussion and that this variance reflects an understanding that the phenomenology of moral experience also differs on the same basis. An attempt is made to spell this out in terms of attachment. The overall picture of Buddhist ethics that emerges is that of an agent-based moral contextualism. This account (...)
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  2. Miri Albahari (2002). Against No-Ātman Theories of Anattā. Asian Philosophy 12 (1):5-20.
    Suppose we were to randomly pick out a book on Buddhism or Eastern Philosophy and turn to the section on 'no-self' (anatt?). On this central teaching, we would most likely learn that the Buddha rejected the Upanisadic notion of Self (?tman), maintaining that a person is no more than a bundle of impermanent, conditioned psycho-physical aggregates (khandhas). The rejection of ?tman is seen by many to separate the metaphysically 'extravagant' claims of Hinduism from the austere tenets of Buddhism. The status (...)
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  3. Ok-Sun An (1997). Compassion and Benevolence: A Comparative Study of Early Buddhist and Classical Confucian Ethics. Peter Lang.
  4. Michael G. Barnhart (2012). Theory and Comparison in the Discussion of Buddhist Ethics. Philosophy East and West 62 (1):16-43.
    Comparisons, and by that I mean the hunt for essential similarities or at least serious family resemblances, between the ethical views of Western and non-Western thinkers have been a staple of comparative philosophy for quite some time now. Some of these comparisons, such as between the views of Aristotle and Confucius, seem especially apt and revealing. However, I’ve often wondered whether Western “ethical theory”—virtue ethics, deontology, or consequentialism—is always the best lens through which to approach non-Western ethical thought. Particularly when (...)
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  5. Michael G. Barnhart (2001). Reinventing the Wheel: A Buddhist Response to the Information Age (Review). Philosophy East and West 51 (3):414-418.
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  6. N. K. Bhagwat (2006). Buddhist Philosophy of the Theravāda. Bharatiya Kala Prakashan.
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  7. N. K. Bhagwat (1929). The Budhistic [Sic] Philosophy of the Theravada School, as Embodied in the Pali Abhidhamma. Patna, Patna University.
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  8. Abraham Vélez De Cea (2005). Emptiness in the Pāli Suttas and the Question of Nāgārjuna's Orthodoxy. Philosophy East and West 55 (4):507 - 528.
    This essay attempts to clarify the position of Nāgārjuna in the history of Buddhist philosophy by comparing the concept of emptiness in the Pāli Nikāyas and the Mūlamadhyamakakārikā. It is argued that the identity of samsāra with nirvāva, the emptiness of svabhāva of all dharmas, and the equating of emptiness and dependent arising are not revolutionary innovations of Nāgārjuna or the second turning of the wheel of Dharma, but orthodox philosophical moves entailed by the teachings of early Buddhism.
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  9. George Chatalian (1968). Jayatilleke on a Concept of Meaninglessness in the Pāli Nikāyas. Philosophy East and West 18 (1/2):67-76.
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  10. Angraj Chaudhary (1994/2012). Essays in Buddhism and Pāli Literature. Eastern Book Linkers.
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  11. Edward Conze (1983). Buddhist Thought in India: Three Phases of Buddhist Philosophy. Allen & Unwin.
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