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  1. Zhihua Yao (2008). Some Mahāsāṃghika Arguments for the Cognition of Nonexistent Objects. Journal of Indian Council of Philosophical Research 25 (3):79-96.
    The present paper explores some pre-Vibhāṣika sources including the Kathāvatthu, *Śāriputrābhidharma, and Vijñānakāya. These sources suggest an early origin of the concept of the cognition of nonexistent objects (asad-ālambana-jñāna) among the Mahāsāṃghikas and some of its sub-schools. These scattered sources also indicate some different aspects of this theory from that held by the Dārṣṭāntikas and the Sautrāntikas. In particular, some Mahāsāṃghika arguments for the cognition of nonexistent objects reveal how a soteriologically-oriented issue gradually develops into a sophisticated philosophical concept.
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Theravada Buddhist Philosophy
  1. Martin T. Adam (2008). Classes of Agent and the Moral Logic of the Pali Canon. Argumentation 22 (1):115-124.
    This paper aims to lay bare the underlying logical structure of early Buddhist moral thinking. It argues that moral vocabulary in the Pali Suttas varies depending on the kind of agent under discussion and that this variance reflects an understanding that the phenomenology of moral experience also differs on the same basis. An attempt is made to spell this out in terms of attachment. The overall picture of Buddhist ethics that emerges is that of an agent-based moral contextualism. This account (...)
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  2. Miri Albahari (2002). Against No-Ātman Theories of Anattā. Asian Philosophy 12 (1):5-20.
    Suppose we were to randomly pick out a book on Buddhism or Eastern Philosophy and turn to the section on 'no-self' (anatt?). On this central teaching, we would most likely learn that the Buddha rejected the Upanisadic notion of Self (?tman), maintaining that a person is no more than a bundle of impermanent, conditioned psycho-physical aggregates (khandhas). The rejection of ?tman is seen by many to separate the metaphysically 'extravagant' claims of Hinduism from the austere tenets of Buddhism. The status (...)
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  3. Ok-Sun An (1997). Compassion and Benevolence: A Comparative Study of Early Buddhist and Classical Confucian Ethics. Peter Lang.
  4. Michael G. Barnhart (2012). Theory and Comparison in the Discussion of Buddhist Ethics. Philosophy East and West 62 (1):16-43.
    Comparisons, and by that I mean the hunt for essential similarities or at least serious family resemblances, between the ethical views of Western and non-Western thinkers have been a staple of comparative philosophy for quite some time now. Some of these comparisons, such as between the views of Aristotle and Confucius, seem especially apt and revealing. However, I’ve often wondered whether Western “ethical theory”—virtue ethics, deontology, or consequentialism—is always the best lens through which to approach non-Western ethical thought. Particularly when (...)
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  5. Michael G. Barnhart (2001). Reinventing the Wheel: A Buddhist Response to the Information Age (Review). Philosophy East and West 51 (3):414-418.
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  6. N. K. Bhagwat (2006). Buddhist Philosophy of the Theravāda. Bharatiya Kala Prakashan.
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  7. N. K. Bhagwat (1929). The Budhistic [Sic] Philosophy of the Theravada School, as Embodied in the Pali Abhidhamma. Patna, Patna University.
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  8. Abraham Vélez De Cea (2005). Emptiness in the Pāli Suttas and the Question of Nāgārjuna's Orthodoxy. Philosophy East and West 55 (4):507 - 528.
    This essay attempts to clarify the position of Nāgārjuna in the history of Buddhist philosophy by comparing the concept of emptiness in the Pāli Nikāyas and the Mūlamadhyamakakārikā. It is argued that the identity of samsāra with nirvāva, the emptiness of svabhāva of all dharmas, and the equating of emptiness and dependent arising are not revolutionary innovations of Nāgārjuna or the second turning of the wheel of Dharma, but orthodox philosophical moves entailed by the teachings of early Buddhism.
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  9. George Chatalian (1968). Jayatilleke on a Concept of Meaninglessness in the Pāli Nikāyas. Philosophy East and West 18 (1/2):67-76.
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  10. Angraj Chaudhary (1994/2012). Essays in Buddhism and Pāli Literature. Eastern Book Linkers.
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  11. Edward Conze (1983). Buddhist Thought in India: Three Phases of Buddhist Philosophy. Allen & Unwin.
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  12. Kate Crosby (2008). Changing the Landscape of Theravada Studies. Contemporary Buddhism 9 (1):1-6.
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  13. Caroline A. F. Rhys Davids (ed.) (1900/1975). A Buddhist Manual of Psychological Ethics of the Fourth Century B.C.: Being a Translation, Now Made for the First Time, From the Original Pali, of the First Book in the Abhidhamma Piṭaka, Entitled Dhamma-Sangaṇi (Compendium of States or Phenomena). Distributed by Munshiram Manoharlal Publishers.
    Hesperides Press are republishing these classic works in affordable, high quality, modern editions, using the original text and artwork.
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  14. Jake H. Davis & Evan Thompson (2013). From the Five Aggregates to Phenomenal Consciousness: Toward a Cross-Cultural Cognitive Science. In Steven M. Emmanuel (ed.), A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy. John Wiley & Sons.
    Buddhism originated and developed in an Indian cultural context that featured many first-person practices for producing and exploring states of consciousness through the systematic training of attention. In contrast, the dominant methods of investigating the mind in Western cognitive science have emphasized third-person observation of the brain and behavior. In this chapter, we explore how these two different projects might prove mutually beneficial. We lay the groundwork for a cross-cultural cognitive science by using one traditional Buddhist model of the mind (...)
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  15. Jake H. Davis & David R. Vago (2013). Can Enlightenment Be Traced to Specific Neural Correlates, Cognition, or Behavior? No, and (a Qualified) Yes. Frontiers in Psychology 4.
    Can enlightenment be traced to specific neural correlates, cognition, or behavior? No, and (a qualified) Yes.
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  16. Krishna Del Toso (2008). The Role of Puñña and Kusala in the Dialectic of the Twofold Right Vision and the Temporary Integration of Eternalism in the Path Towards Spiritual Emancipation According to the Pāli Nikāyas. Esercizi Filosofici 3:32-58.
    Abstract: This article shows how in the Pāli Nikāyas, after having defined Eternalism and Nihilism as two opposed positions, Gotama makes a dialectical use of Eternalism as means to eliminate Nihilism, upheld to be the worst point of view because of its denial of kammic maturation in terms of puñña and pāpa. Assuming, from an Eternalist perspective, that actions have effects also beyond the present life, Gotama underlines the necessity of betting on the validity of moral kammic retribution. Having thus (...)
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  17. Mădavacciyē Dhammajōti (2009). Concept of Emptiness in Pāli Literature. Godage International Publishers.
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  18. Georges Dreyfus (2011). Is Mindfulness Present-Centred and Non-Judgmental? A Discussion of the Cognitive Dimensions of Mindfulness. Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):41--54.
  19. Roger-Pol Droit (1986). Le Bouddha philosophe? Recherche sur quelques" non-concepts" du Sutta-Piṭaka (Canon Pāli). le Cahier (Collège International de Philosophie) 2:82-86.
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  20. William Edelglass & Jay L. Garfield (eds.) (2009). Buddhist Philosophy: Essential Readings. Oxford University Press.
    This volume is an ideal single text for an intermediate or advanced course in Buddhist philosophy, and makes this tradition immediately accessible to the ...
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  21. Rupert Gethin (2011). On Some Definitions of Mindfulness. Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):263--279.
    The Buddhist technical term was first translated as ?mindfulness? by T.W. Rhys Davids in 1881. Since then various authors, including Rhys Davids, have attempted definitions of what precisely is meant by mindfulness. Initially these were based on readings and interpretations of ancient Buddhist texts. Beginning in the 1950s some definitions of mindfulness became more informed by the actual practice of meditation. In particular, Nyanaponika's definition appears to have had significant influence on the definition of mindfulness adopted by those who developed (...)
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  22. Nicholas F. Gier & Johnson Petta (2007). Hebrew and Buddhist Selves: A Constructive Postmodern Study. Asian Philosophy 17 (1):47 – 64.
    Our task will be to demonstrate that there are instructive parallels between Hebrew and Buddhist concepts of self. There are at least five main constituents (skandhas in Sanskrit) of the Hebrew self: (1) nepe as living being; (2) rah as indwelling spirit; (3) lb as heart-mind; (4) bāār as flesh; and (5) dām as blood. We will compare these with the five Buddhist skandhas: disposition (samskāra), consciousness (vijñāna), feeling (vedanā), perception (samjñā), and body (rpa). Generally, what we will discover is (...)
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  23. Giuliano Giustarini (2012). The Role of Fear (Bhaya) in the Nikāyas and in the Abhidhamma. Journal of Indian Philosophy 40 (5):511-531.
    According to Buddhist soteriology, fear is a direct cause of suffering and one of the main obstacles in the path to liberation. Pāli Suttas and Abhidhamma present a number of sophisticated strategies to deal with fear and to overcome it. Nevertheless, in the Nikāyas and in the Abhidhamma there are also consistent instructions about implementing fear in meditative practices and considering it as a valuable ally in the pursuit of nibbāna By means of a lexicographical study of selected passages and (...)
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  24. Jacquetta Gomes (2004). The Development and Use of the Eight Precepts for Lay Practitioners, Upāsakas and Upāsikās in Theravāda Buddhism in the West. Contemporary Buddhism 5 (1):47-63.
    (2004). The development and use of the eight precepts for lay practitioners, Upāsakas and Upāsikās in Theravāda Buddhism in the West. Contemporary Buddhism: Vol. 5, No. 1, pp. 47-63.
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  25. Luis O. Gómez (1976). Proto-Mādhyamika in the Pāli Canon. Philosophy East and West 26 (2):137-165.
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  26. Charles Goodman (2009). Analytical Buddhism: The Two-Tiered Illusion of Self. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (1):159 – 162.
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  27. Charles Goodman (2009). Consequences of Compassion: An Interpretation and Defense of Buddhist Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Fundamental Buddhist teachings -- Main features of some western ethical theories -- Teravāda ethics as rule-consequentialism -- Mahāyāna ethics before Śāntideva and after -- Transcending ethics -- Buddhist ethics and the demands of consequentialism -- Buddhism on moral responsibility -- Punishment -- Objections and replies -- A Buddhist response to Kant.
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  28. Alastair Gornall (forthcoming). How Many Sounds Are in Pāli? Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-40.
    This article highlights the central importance of Pāli phonetics in Theravāda Buddhism. In doing so, I focus on a single yet fundamental point of contention regarding the number of sounds in the Pāli language from the twelfth to fifteenth century. I argue that this debate on the number of sounds was of central concern due to the importance of Pāli pronunciation in the ritual sphere, the development of new regional monastic identities, and the introduction of regional scripts. In tracing this (...)
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  29. Christopher W. Gowans (2014). Buddhist Moral Philosophy: An Introduction. Routledge.
    The first book of its kind, Buddhist Moral Philosophy: An Introduction introduces the reader to contemporary philosophical interpretations and analyses of Buddhist ethics. It begins with a survey of traditional Buddhist ethical thought and practice, mainly in the Pali Canon and early Mahāyāna schools, and an account of the emergence of Buddhist moral philosophy as a distinct discipline in the modern world. It then examines recent debates about karma, rebirth and nirvana, well-being, normative ethics, moral objectivity, moral psychology, and the (...)
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  30. C. Ananda Grero (1996). An Analysis of the Theravada Vinaya in the Light of Modern Legal Philosophy. Karunaratne & Sons.
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  31. Paul J. Griffiths (1986). On Being Mindless: Buddhist Meditation And The Mind-Body Problem. La Salle: Open Court.
  32. Peter Harvey (2000). The Mind and its Development in Theravāda Buddhism. Communication and Cognition. Monographies 33 (1-2):65-81.
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  33. Peter Harvey (1993). The Mind-Body Relationship in Pali Buddhism: A Philosophical Investigation. Asian Philosophy 3 (1):29 – 41.
    Abstract The Suttas indicate physical conditions for success in meditation, and also acceptance of a not?Self life?principle (primarily viññana) which is (usually) dependent on the mortal physical body. In the Abhidhamma and commentaries, the physical acts on the mental through the senses and through the ?basis? for mind?organ and mind?consciousness, which came to be seen as the ?heart?basis?. Mind acts on the body through two ?intimations?: fleeting modulations in the primary physical elements. Various forms of r?pa are also said to (...)
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  34. Peter Harvey & Mark Siderits (2004). An Introduction to Buddhist Ethics: Foundations, Values and Issues. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (3):405–409.
    This systematic introduction to Buddhist ethics is aimed at anyone interested in Buddhism, including students, scholars and general readers. Peter Harvey is the author of the acclaimed Introduction to Buddhism (Cambridge, 1990), and his new book is written in a clear style, assuming no prior knowledge. At the same time it develops a careful, probing analysis of the nature and practical dynamics of Buddhist ethics in both its unifying themes and in the particularities of different Buddhist traditions. The book applies (...)
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  35. Maria Heim (2013). The Forerunner of All Things: Buddhaghosa on Mind, Intention, and Agency. Oup Usa.
    Scholars have long been intrigued by the Buddha's defining action (karma) as intention. This book explores systematically how intention, agency, and moral psychology were interpreted in all branches of early Theravada thought, paying special attention to the thought of the 5th-century commentator Buddhaghosa.
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  36. Maria Heim (2009). The Conceit of Self-Loathing. Journal of Indian Philosophy 37 (1):61-74.
    This article explores the psychological intricacies of the Theravādin interpretation of the “conceit of inferiority” (omāna), which is considered to be one of the standard types of pride or conceit (māna). Considering oneself inferior involves an inflated and contrived construction of oneself, akin to other varieties of conceit. Yet (omāna) is a curious form of pride, involving as it does much selfabasement, and even loathing and despising of oneself. Drawing primarily on Abhidhamma canonical and commentarial texts, the article investigates how (...)
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  37. Kenneth K. Inada (1994). The Buddhist Aesthetic Nature: A Challenge to Rationalism and Empiricism. Asian Philosophy 4 (2):139 – 150.
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  38. Marzenna Jakubczak (2012). Why Didn't Siddhartha Gautama Become a Samkhya Philosopher, After All? In Irina Kuznetsova, Jonardon Ganeri & Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad (eds.), Hindu and Buddhist Ideas in Dialogue. Self and No-Self. Ashgate.
    The chapter is divided into five sections. Firstly, I shall briefly describe the phenomenon of Kāpil Maṭh, a Sāṃkhya-Yoga āśrama founded in the early twentieth century by a charismatic Bengali scholar-monk Swāmi Hariharānanda Ᾱraṇya (1869–1947); while referring to Hariharānanda’s writings I will also consider the idea of the re-establishment of an extinct philosophical school. Secondly, I shall specify the method of analysis I apply while addressing the question raised in the title of my chapter and discuss some relevant Sanskrit and (...)
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  39. Matthew Kapstein, S. Radhakrishnan, Iqbal Singh & Arvind Sharma (eds.) (2004). The Buddhism Omnibus. Oxford University Press.
    The three works brought together in this collection explore Buddhism as a rich source of literary legend, an austere ethical guide, and a contemporary philosophy very relevant in the modern world in view of the resurgence of interest in the Buddha and his philosophy. Matthew T. Kapstein in his Introduction provides a concise historical overview of Buddhism in India and the renewal of interest in the Buddha s teachings and also situates the works in their proper contexts. Gautama Buddha by (...)
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  40. Goran Kardas (2013). Patisambhidamagga as an Early Exegetical Work of Theravada Buddhism. Filozofska Istrazivanja 33 (1):139-150.
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  41. Damien Keown (2005). Buddhist Ethics: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.
    The latter half of the twentieth century witnessed a growing interest in Buddhism, and it continues to capture the imagination of many in the West who see it as either an alternative or a supplement to their own religious beliefs. Numerous introductory books have appeared in recent years to cater to this growing interest, but almost none devotes attention to the specifically ethical dimensions of the tradition. For various complex cultural and historical reasons, ethics has not received as much attention (...)
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  42. Hâgoḍa Khemānanda (1993). Logic and Epistemology in Theravāda =. Dharma Paryeshanalaya.
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  43. Winston L. King (2001). In the Hope of Nibb⁻Ana: The Ethics of Therav⁻Ada Buddhism. Pariyatti Press.
    CHAPTER I THE FRAMEWORK OF SELF-PERFECTION 1. Buddhism and Ethics Anyone who has read even a very little in the early Buddhist Scriptures is aware that from ...
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  44. Winston L. King (1964). In the Hope of Nibbana; an Essay on Theravada Buddhist Ethics. Lasalle, Ill.,Open Court.
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  45. Matthew Kosuta (2007). Theravada Emptiness. Contemporary Buddhism 8 (1):19-29.
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  46. Moṅʻ Moṅʻ Krīʺ (2010). Vibhajja ʼa Laṅʻʺ Tanʻʺ Myāʺ. Loka Natʻ Cā Pe.
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  47. Michael P. Levine (2003). Can the Concept of Enlightenment Evolve? Asian Philosophy 13 (2 & 3):115 – 129.
    Those who claim the concept of enlightenment (nibānna) has not evolved must rest their claim on a strong distinction between changing and variant interpretations of the concept on the one hand, and what the term really means or refers to on the other. This paper examines whether all evolution of the concept of enlightenment is best seen as interpretive variation rather than as embodying real notional change - a change in the reference of the term. It is implausible to suppose (...)
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  48. G. P. Malalasekera (1968). The Status of the Individual in Theravada Buddhist Philosophy. In Charles Alexander Moore (ed.), The Status of the Individual in East and West. Honolulu, University of Hawaii Press.
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  49. G. P. Malalasekera (1964). The Status of the Individual in Theravāda Buddhism. Philosophy East and West 14 (2):145-156.
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