This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
41 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
  1. Raimo Anttila (1974). An Introduction to Historical and Comparative Linguistics. Foundations of Language 11 (4):575-582.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   33 citations  
  2. Nicholas Baechle (2008). Linguistics (H.) Dik Word Order in Tragic Dialogue. Oxford UP. 2007. Pp. Xvi + 281. £55. 9780199279296. Journal of Hellenic Studies 128:269-.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Peter Baker (1990). Old English Meter and Linguistic Theory. [REVIEW] Speculum 65 (2):490-491.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. P. J. Barber (2008). Linguistics (A.-F.) Christidis Ed. (With the Assistance of Maria Arapopoulou and Maria Chriti.) A History of Ancient Greek. From the Beginnings to Late Antiquity. Cambridge UP, 2007. Pp. Xli + 1617, Illus. £140. 9780521833073. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 128:265-.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. George Barton (1923). The Expression of the Comparative Degree in Sumerian. Journal of the American Oriental Society 43:243-244.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Corien Bary & Markus Egg (2012). Variety in Ancient Greek Aspect Interpretation. Linguistics and Philosophy 35 (2):111-134.
    The wide range of interpretations of aoristic and imperfective aspect in Ancient Greek cannot be attributed to unambiguous aspectual operators but suggest an analysis in terms of coercion in the spirit of de Swart (Nat Lang Linguist Theory 16:347–385, 1998). But since such an analysis cannot explain the Ancient Greek data, we combine Klein’s (Time in language, 1994) theory of tense and aspect with Egg’s (Flexible semantics for reinterpretation phenomena, 2005) aspectual coercion approach. Following Klein. (grammatical) aspect relates the runtime (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Pedro Beade (1989). Falsification and Falsifiability in Historical Linguistics. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 19 (2):173-181.
  8. H. Berger (1970). Van de saussure tot Chomsky: Een linguistische situatiebepaling Van het structuralisme. Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 32 (2):175 - 196.
    Several representatives of structuralism relate the concept of structure to the langue of Ferdinand de Saussure. And so a linguistic approximation to structuralism seems possible. Such an approximation makes sense for another reason : because of the growing importance of transformational linguistics and the criticism of structuralism expressed by Noam Chomsky. In this article the main ideas of de Saussure and Chomsky are analysed, resulting in the confrontation of langue (de Saussure) and competence (Chomsky). Chomsky's criticism of langue as "a (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Patrice Bergheaud (1985). Empiricism and Linguistics in Eighteenth-Century Great Britain. Topoi 4 (2):155-163.
    This paper aims at specifying the complex links which two major and polemically related 18th-century linguistic theories James Harris' universal grammar in Hermes (1751) and John Horne Tooke's system of etymology in the Diversions of Purley (1786, 1804) bear to empiricism. It describes both the ideologicalethical determining factors of the theories and the epistemological consequences dependent upon their respective philosophical orientation (Harris using classical Greek philosophy against empiricism, Tooke criticizing Locke's semantics along Hobbesian lines). The effects within the linguistic theories (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Pratibha Biswas (1995). Indian Mind Through the Ages: A Select Annotated Bibliography of Periodical Literature, 1951-1966, on Indian Philosophy, Religion, Literature, and Linguistics From the Post-Vedic to the Pre-Kalidasa Era. [REVIEW] Bharati Book Stall.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Robert Bjork (1994). A Grammar Of Old English, 1: Phonology. [REVIEW] Speculum 69 (3):800-802.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Andreas Blank (1999). For Lexical Semantic Change. In Andreas Blank & Peter Koch (eds.), Historical Semantics and Cognition. Mouton de Gruyter 13--61.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Mary Blockley (1998). Cædmon's Conjunction: Cædmon's Hymn 7a Revisited. Speculum 73 (1):1-31.
    Bruce Mitchell has observed that “It is not always possible to say with certainty whether clauses introduced by words such as þœr, þa, and þonne are principal or subordinate. The problem arises more often in the poetry, where the element order is a less certain guide than it is in the prose.” In prose the feature of the element order that usually sorts out clause-initial adverbs from conjunctions is the position of the finite verb. When the finite verb immediately follows (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. H. L. Bolling (1917). Sturtevant, E. H.: Linguistic Change: An Introduction to the Historical Study of Language. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 11:148-150.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. Ivan Bolognesi (2009). “Natural Constructivism”: Old Wine In A New Bottle? Review Of “Human Language And Objective Reality” By William Cameron. [REVIEW] Constructivist Foundations 5 (1):66-67.
    A “natural constructivist” attempt to explain the practice of knowing and other mental talk by showing how these practices have “naturally” emerged, where this natural emergence is in a realist home rather than a constructivist one.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Michael M. Broido (1984). Abhiprāya and Implication in Tibetan Linguistics. Journal of Indian Philosophy 12 (1):1-33.
  17. Lajos L. Brons (2014). Language Death and Diversity: Philosophical and Linguistic Implications. The Science of Mind 52:243-260.
    This paper presents a simple model to estimate the number of languages that existed throughout history, and considers philosophical and linguistic implications of the findings. The estimated number is 150,000 plus or minus 50,000. Because only few of those remain, and there is no reason to believe that that remainder is a statistically representative sample, we should be very cautious about universalistic claims based on existing linguistic variation.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. Frank Cabrera (forthcoming). Cladistic Parsimony, Historical Linguistics, and Cultural Phylogenetics. Mind and Language.
    Here, I consider the recent application of phylogenetic methods in historical linguistics. After a preliminary survey of one such method, i.e. cladistic parsimony, I respond to two common criticisms of cultural phylogenies: (1) that cultural artifacts cannot be modeled as tree-like because of borrowing across lineages, and (2) that the mechanism of cultural change differs radically from that of biological evolution. I argue that while perhaps (1) remains true for certain cultural artifacts, the nature of language may be such as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. James Clackson (2007). Linguistics (F.R.) Adrados A History of the Greek Language. From its Origins to the Present. Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2005. Pp. Xix + 345. 99. 9004128352. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:239-.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. James Clackson (2006). Fortson IV (B.W.) Indo-European Language and Culture. An Introduction . (Blackwell Textbooks in Linguistics 19.) Pp. Xviii + 468, Maps. Malden, MA and Oxford: Blackwell Publishing, 2004. Cased, £65 (Paper, £24.99). ISBN: 1-4051-0315-9 (1-4051-0316-7 Pbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 56 (01):89-.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Stephen Colvin (2007). Linguistics (R.V.) Munson Black Doves Speak. Herodotus and the Languages of Barbarians. Washington, DC: Center for Hellenic Studies, 2005. Pp. Ix + 121. $14.95. 0674017900. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:236-.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Fred D'Agostino (1985). Ontology and Explanation in Historical Linguistics. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 15 (2):147-165.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Vito Evola, Cognitive Linguistics and the Evolution of Body and Soul in the Western World: From Ancient Hebrew to Modern English.
    A philological and comparative analysis of the lexical items concerning personhood in Ancient Hebrew, Ancient Greek and Modern English reveals semantic shifts concerning the relative lexical concepts. Ancient Hebrew presents an essentially holistic idea of personhood, whereas, via Biblical translations and Greek philosophical influences, the Western World has conceptualized humans as being dualistic in nature. I analyze the polysemy and semantic shifts in the lexicon used for "body" and "soul" in Ancient Hebrew and Ancient Greek, which are the two linguistic (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. James W. Gair (2007). The Dhivehi Language: A Descriptive and Historical Grammar of Dhivehi and Its Dialects. 2 Vols. Journal of the American Oriental Society 127 (3):365.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. T. V. Gamkrelidze & V. V. Ivanov (1987). Language Systems and Principles of Reconstruction in Linguistics. Diogenes 35 (137):1-25.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Louis Gray (1901). Contributions to Avestan Syntax, the Subordinate Clause. Journal of the American Oriental Society 22:145-176.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Ignace Haaz (2006). Nietzsche et la métaphore cognitive. Dissertation, Geneva (Switzerland)
    F. Nietzsche does interesting indications on the anthropological foundation of language in his lessons on classical rhetoric, at the University of Basel in 1874. Many quotations of Gerber and Humboldt, and older notions, drawn from the Aristotle's Rhetoric are discussed in this dissertation. Many studies highlighted Nietzsche's attempts during thirty years (1976-2006) to draw a consistent anthropological foundation of the language. Some of them shed light on the metaphor, described from the point of view of anthropology, as an innovative perspective (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Gillian R. Hart (1992). Latin Linguistics Robert Coleman (Ed.): New Studies in Latin Linguistics. Selected Papers From the 4th International Colloquium on Latin Linguistics, Cambridge, April 1992. (Studies in Language Companion Series, 21.) Pp. X + 478. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 1991. Fl. 250/$132.00. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 42 (02):353-355.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Larry Allen Hickman (1971). Logical Second Intentions: Late Scholastic Theories of Higher Level Predicates. Dissertation, The University of Texas at Austin
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  30. Christopher Hitchcock (1999). Exactness and Pseudoexactness in Historical Linguistics. Topoi 18 (2):127-139.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Christopher Hitchcock (1998). The Common Cause Principle in Historical Linguistics. Philosophy of Science 65 (3):425-447.
    Despite the platitude that analytic philosophy is deeply concerned with language, philosophers of science have paid little attention to methodological issues that arise within historical linguistics. I broach this topic by arguing that many inferences in historical linguistics conform to Reichenbach's common cause principle (CCP). Although the scope of CCP is narrower than many have thought, inferences about the genealogies of languages are particularly apt for reconstruction using CCP. Quantitative approaches to language comparison are readily understood as methods for detecting (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. Henry M. Hoenigswald (1974). Studies in Formal Historical Linguistics. Foundations of Language 12 (1):147-148.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Geoffrey Horrocks (2007). Linguistics (R.) Hodot Ed. La koiné grecque antique 5: Alternances codiques et changements de code. Nancy: ADRA and Paris: De Boccard, 2004. Pp. 151. 30. 9782913667112. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:238-.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Joshua T. Katz (2007). Linguistics (T.) Meissner S-Stem Nouns and Adjectives in Greek and Proto-Indo-European. A Diachronic Study in Word Formation. (Oxford Classical Monographs). Oxford UP, 2006. Pp. Xii + 264. £50. 9780199280087. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:235-.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Paul Kiparsky, P ¯ Aninian Linguistics.
    It is the foundation of all traditional and modern analyses of Sanskrit, as well as having great historical and theoretical interest in its own right. Western grammatical theory has been influenced by it at every stage of its development for the last two centuries. The early 19th century comparativists learned from it the principles of morphological analysis. Bloomfield modeled both his classic Algonquian grammars and the logical-positivist axiomatization of his Postulates on it. Modern linguistics acknowledges it as the most complete (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Hildegard Lewy (1956). On Some Old Assyrian Cereal Names. Journal of the American Oriental Society 76 (3):201-204.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Lynn R. LiDonnici (forthcoming). Compositional Background of the Epidaurian'Iamata. American Journal of Philology.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. R. Sharma (1989). Pāṇini on Linguistic Description. Journal of the American Oriental Society 109 (4):635-637.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. James Turner (2015). 5. “The Similarity of Structure Which Pervades All Languages”: From Philology to Linguistics, 1800–1850. In Philology: The Forgotten Origins of the Modern Humanities. Princeton University Press 123-146.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Thérèse Vedet (2005). Parry in Paris: Structuralism, Historical Linguistics, and the Oral Theory. Classical Antiquity 24 (2):257-284.
    This paper investigates the origins of the Oral Theory as formulated by Milman Parry in Paris during the late 1920s by reexamining the scholarship on which it rests. Parry's Oral Theory compared the texts of oral performances in Yugoslavia with the Homeric texts in order to shed light on the presumed oral origins of the latter. His work integrated the work of the linguist and Indo-Europeanist Antoine Meillet, the linguist and scholar of oral poetics Matthias Murko, and the anthropologists Lucien (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Karl Heinz Wagner (1972). Generative Grammatical Studies in the Old English Language. Foundations of Language 8 (3):449-455.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography