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  1. added 2016-08-27
    Leone Gazziero (2016). "Aucun attribut universel n’est une substance" (Aristotelis Metaphysica, Z, 13, 1038b 35). Aristote critique des Idées de Plato. Annuaire de l'École Pratique des Hautes Études 123:121-142.
    Y a-t-il des Idées et peut-on démontrer qu’elles existent ? Parmi les protagonistes anciens de la controverse qui a opposé partisans et adversaires des Idées, Aristote mérite une attention toute particulière. De fait, si – au moment où Aristote intervient dans le débat autour de l’hypothèse des Idées – ce débat a déjà une histoire, c’est avec lui que cette histoire atteint une maturité qui est à la fois d’ordre doctrinal et doxographique. De fait, non seulement Aristote est le premier (...)
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  2. added 2016-08-27
    David Chai (2015). Raphals, Lisa. Divination and Prediction in Early China and Ancient Greece. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 10 (2):322-326.
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  3. added 2016-08-26
    Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Reawakening to Wonder: Wittgenstein, Feyerabend, and Scientism. In Jonathan Beale & Ian James Kidd (eds.), Wittgenstein and Scientism. Routledge
    My aim in this chapter is to reconstruct Feyerabend’s anti-scientism by comparing it with the similar critiques of one of his main philosophical influences – Ludwig Wittgenstein. I argue that they share a common conception of scientism that gathers around a concern that it erodes a sense of wonder or mystery required for a full appreciation of human existence – a sense that Feyerabend, like Wittgenstein, characterised in terms of the ‘mystical’.
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  4. added 2016-08-26
    Jason Springs (2016). A Wittgenstein for Postliberal Theologians. Modern Theology 32 (4).
    Remarkably, the theological discourse surrounding Hans Frei and postliberal theology has continued for nearly thirty years since Frei's death. This is due not only to the complex and provocative character of Frei's work, nor only to his influence upon an array of thinkers who went on to shape the theological field in their own right. It is just as indebted to the critical responses that his thinking continues to inspire. One recurrent point of criticism takes aim at Frei's use of (...)
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  5. added 2016-08-26
    Samantha Matherne (2016). Kantian Themes in Merleau-Ponty’s Theory of Perception. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 98 (2):193-230.
    It has become typical to read Kant and Merleau-Ponty as offering competing approaches to perceptual experience. Kant is interpreted as an ‘intellectualist’ who regards perception as conceptual ‘all the way out’, while Merleau-Ponty is seen as Kant’s challenger, who argues that perception involves non-conceptual, embodied ‘coping’. In this paper, however, I argue that a closer examination of their views of perception, especially with respect to the notion of ‘schematism’, reveals a great deal of historical and philosophical continuity between them. By (...)
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  6. added 2016-08-26
    Sven Nyholm (2016). On Kant's Idea of Humanity as an End in Itself. European Journal of Philosophy 24 (2):358-374.
    Writers like Christine Korsgaard and Allen Wood understand Kant's idea of rational nature as an end in itself as a commitment to a substantive value. This makes it hard for them to explain the supposed equivalence between the universal law and humanity formulations of the categorical imperative, since the former does not appear to assert any substantive value. Nor is it easy for defenders of value-based readings to explain Kant's claim that the law-giving nature of practical reason makes all beings (...)
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  7. added 2016-08-26
    Steven Fesmire (2016). USEFUL FOR WHAT? DEWEY's CALL TO HUMANIZE TECHNO-INDUSTRIAL CIVILIZATION. Pragmatism Today 7 (1):11-19.
    The heart of Dewey’s call to humanize technoindustrial civilization was to conceive science and technology in the service of aesthetic consummations. Hence his philosophy suggests a way to reclaim and affirm technology on behalf of living more fulfilling lives. He remains a powerful ally today in the fight against deadening efficiency, narrow means-end calculation, “frantic exploitation,” and the industrialization of everything. Nonetheless, it is common to depict him as a philosopher we should think around rather than with. The first section (...)
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  8. added 2016-08-26
    Stefano Maso (2015). Grasp and Dissent. Cicero and Epicurean Philosophy. Brepols.
    The present study centres on the distinctive characteristics of Cicero's philosophical training. Not only does Cicero exhibit his lofty philosophical proficiency anchored in the Academic school, but he also proves an excellent authority on Epicurus's proposed philosophy.
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  9. added 2016-08-26
    Stefano Maso & Francesca G. Masi (2015). Epicurus on Eidola. Peri Phuseos Book II. Update, Proposals, and Discussions. Hakkert.
    This book collects nine contributions on the second book of the book "On Nature" of Epicurus. At the center is the problem of "images." In the Appendix, the new critical text edited by Giuliana Leone is published.
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  10. added 2016-08-26
    Stefano Maso (2015). Images and Truth. In Stefano Maso Francesca G. Masi (ed.), Epicurus on eidola. Peri Phuseos Book II. Update, Proposals, and Discussions. 67-92.
    The new edition of the papiri of the second book of 'Peri Phuseos' allows for a detailed reconstruction of the mechanisms of vision. Some of the characteristic features of images according to Epicurus are presented here for the first time. One of the problems is the congruence between the representation and the object from which it originates: i.e. the truth of the image.
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  11. added 2016-08-26
    Roberto Limonta & Riccardo Fedriga (2015). Prophetae non dixerunt falsum. Documenti E Studi Sulla Tradizione Filosofica Medievale 26:399-432.
    In this article we intend to explore the use of the prophetic statements in some epistemic models of XIVth-century theology. Specifically, we shall focus on Peter Auriol’s and William of Ockham’s theories : although they lead to different solutions, these theories are grounded on a common linguistic approach to the topic. For XIVth-century theologians, the prophecy becomes a kind of epistemic test, useful to verify coherence and firmness of the theories of knowledge. Peter Auriol manages to reconcile divine foreknowledge, future (...)
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  12. added 2016-08-26
    Stefano Maso (2013). Quarundam Rerum Initia in Nostra Potestate Sunt. In Stefano Maso Francesca Masi (ed.), Fate, Chance, and Fortune in Ancient Thought. 125-144.
    Does the Stoic school really, accepting fate, reject free will? It would seem so, mainly if we read the evidences of Zeno or Chrysippus. The Stoic Senecais central to this particular theoretical inquiry, which hinges on the concepts of causality, of determinism and responsibility.
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  13. added 2016-08-26
    Pablo Lorenzano (2011). La filosofía de la ciencia y el lenguaje: relaciones cambiantes, alcances y límites. Arbor 187 (747):69-80.
    This paper consists of three sections. In the first one, some of the main developments in the philosophy of science through the xx century up to the present will be pointed out, and inserted them in the frame of some more general philosophical transformations, such as the so-called “linguistic turn” and “pragmatic turn”, respectively. In the second one, the established connection will be nuanced, from a revision of the work of a “classical” author such as Carnap. Finally, it will be (...)
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  14. added 2016-08-26
    Giovanni G. Balestrieri (2010). Machiavelli e la doppia fondazione della dottrina dei conflitti sociali. La Cultura: Rivista di filosofia, letteratura, storia 48 (3).
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  15. added 2016-08-26
    Giovanni G. Balestrieri (2008). La posizione del capitolo IX del Principe nel pensiero di Machiavelli. Teoria Politica 24 (3).
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  16. added 2016-08-26
    Arif Ahmed (2007). Saul Kripke. Bloomsbury.
    Saul Kripke is one of the most important and original post-war analytic philosophers. His work has undeniably had a profound impact on the philosophy of language and the philosophy of mind. Yet his ideas are amongst the most challenging frequently encountered by students of philosophy. In this informative and accessible book, Arif Ahmed provides a clear and thorough account of Kripke's philosophy, his major works and ideas, providing an ideal guide to the important and complex thought of this key philosopher. (...)
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  17. added 2016-08-25
    Shalom Sadik (2016). Eckhart, Lost in Translation_: La Traduction de _Sh-H-R Par Yehuda Alharizi Et Ses Implications Philosophiques. Vivarium 54 (2-3):125-145.
    _ Source: _Volume 54, Issue 2-3, pp 125 - 145 Maimonides’s _Guide for the Perplexed_ had a significant influence on both Jewish and Christian philosophy, although the vast majority of Jewish and Christian readers in the Middle Ages could not read the original Judeo-Arabic text. Instead, they had access to the text through Hebrew and Latin translations. The article focuses on words derived from the root _sh-h-r_ in the original text of Maimonides, first on the understanding of Maimonides himself, where (...)
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  18. added 2016-08-25
    Michael Joseph Fitzgerald † (2016). The ‘English Rule’ in Master Anonymous’ Question 6 on the Perihermeneias_: _Utrum Nomina Obliqua Sint Nomina Apud Logicum. Vivarium 54 (2-3):166-172.
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  19. added 2016-08-24
    Lukáš Lička (2016). Centrum a periferie v historiografii filosofie: Petr Olivi a středověká nauka o duši. In Marek Otisk & Adam Olech (eds.), Filosofie v provincii / Filozofia na prowincji. Ostravská Univerzita 104-119.
    Centre and Periphery in the Historiography of Philosophy: Peter Olivi and Medieval Psychology The paper inquiries into the (historiographical) question what does it mean to be a “marginal thinker” in the context of the medieval philosophy. The question is investigated on the example of Franciscan philosopher and theologian Peter Olivi (1248/49–1298) and his philosophical psychology. First, a preliminary option is introduced: for a thinker, being “marginal” depends on his relation to who is considered to be canonical. Since the most famous (...)
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  20. added 2016-08-24
    Swami Narasimhananda (2014). Book Review Postcolonial Reason and Its Critique. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 119 (12):695-6.
    Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak asked a question in 1988: ‘Can the Subaltern Speak?’ That question was the expression of a lifetime of observation of the marginalised and witnessing of attempts to civilise the ‘aborigine’. Eventually, this question led to A Critique of Postcolonial Reason: Toward a History of the Vanishing Present (CPR) in 1999. A seminal work, this book unsettled and reoriented the thoughts of scholars, brought up new questions and insights, and the very construct of civilisation and culture was challenged. (...)
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  21. added 2016-08-24
    Wolfgang Ertl (2013). "Kant und die Scholastik heute". Vorüberlegungen zu einer Neueinschätzung. The Geibun-Kenkyu 105 (2):20-40.
    First, I will discuss several reasons as to why there is still almost a reluctance to reading Kant’s philosophy in the context of the scholastic tradition. The focus will be on (i) the label “revolutionary” often attached to Kant’s thought thereby suggesting a radical break with the past, especially with regard to philosophers often perceived as conservative, and (ii) the issue of confessional ramifications (not unrelated to the first point) will also be touched upon, albeit briefly. Then, two examples will (...)
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  22. added 2016-08-23
    Finnur Dellsén (forthcoming). Certainty and Explanation in Descartes' Philosophy of Science. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science.
    This paper presents a new approach to resolving an apparent tension in Descartes’ discussion of scientific theories and explanations in the Principles of Philosophy. On the one hand, Descartes repeatedly claims that any theories presented in science must be certain and indubitable. On the other hand, Descartes himself presents an astonishing number of speculative explanations of various scientific phenomena. In response to this tension, commentators have suggested that Descartes changed his mind about scientific theories having to be certain and indubitable, (...)
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  23. added 2016-08-23
    Corey Martin, Nathan Mastropaolo, Robert Santucci, Erik Shell & Judith P. Hallett (2016). Frederick J. Booth. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):549-549.
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  24. added 2016-08-23
    Roger D. Woodard (2016). Hesiod’s Theogony: From Near Eastern Creation Myths to Paradise Lost by Stephen Scully. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):572-573.
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  25. added 2016-08-23
    Giulia Bonasio (2016). The Pleasures of Reason in Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic Hedonists by James Warren. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):556-557.
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  26. added 2016-08-23
    Rachel Meyers (2016). Filiae Augustorum: The Ties That Bind in the Antonine Age. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):487-505.
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  27. added 2016-08-23
    Mary Brown, Judith P. Hallett, Maria Marsilio & Ann Raia (2016). Barbara F. McManus. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):547-548.
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  28. added 2016-08-23
    Graham Oliver (2016). Poiesis: Manufacturing in Classical Athens by Peter Acton. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):555-556.
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  29. added 2016-08-23
    Benjamin Eldon Stevens (2016). Smell and Sociocultural Value Judgment in Catullus. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):465-486.
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  30. added 2016-08-23
    Paul Properzio (2016). Homer, The Iliad: A New Translation Trans. Peter Green. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):565-567.
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  31. added 2016-08-23
    Wolfgang Mann (2016). Bridging the Gap Between Aristotle’s Science and Ethics Ed. By Devin Henry and Karen Margrethe Nielsen. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):570-572.
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  32. added 2016-08-23
    Michael Arnush (2016). David Hugh Porter. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):543-545.
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  33. added 2016-08-23
    Joseph Mcalhany (2016). Varro Varius: The Polymath of the Roman World Ed. By D. J. Butterfield. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):569-570.
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  34. added 2016-08-23
    Thomas Bunting, Talia Chicherio, Christopher Manners, Mark Weadon & Judith P. Hallett (2016). William Klingshirn. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):553-554.
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  35. added 2016-08-23
    Carol C. Mattusch (2016). Museum Archetypes and Collecting in the Ancient World Ed. By Maia Wellington Gahtan and Donatella Pegazzano. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):557-559.
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  36. added 2016-08-23
    Raymond Van Dam (2016). Emperors and Ancestors: Roman Rulers and the Constraints of Tradition by Olivier Hekster. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):562-564.
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  37. added 2016-08-23
    Patrick M. Owens (2016). Barbarisms at the Gate: An Analysis of Some Perils in Active Latin Pedagogy. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):507-523.
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  38. added 2016-08-23
    Deborah Steiner (2016). State Pilgrims and Sacred Observers in Ancient Greece: A Study of Theōriā and Theōroi by Ian Rutherford. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):567-569.
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  39. added 2016-08-23
    Allison Taylor-Adams (2016). Learning to Fly: Vocabulary Acquisition and Extensive Reading in an Intermediate Classical Greek Class. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):525-542.
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  40. added 2016-08-23
    Stephanie Ann Frampton (2016). Inside Roman Libraries: Book Collections and Their Management in Antiquity by George W. Houston. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):560-562.
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  41. added 2016-08-23
    Noah Cogan, Allison Goldstein-Berger, Emily Mohr, Matthew Moore, Bryan Hallett & Judith P. Hallett (2016). Linda Fabrizio. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):551-552.
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  42. added 2016-08-23
    Caleb M. X. Dance (2016). Laughter, Humor, and the Making of Gender: Historical and Cultural Perspectives Ed. By Anna Foka and Jonas Liliequist. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):564-565.
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  43. added 2016-08-23
    William Thalmann (2016). Playing Hesiod: The “Myth of the Races” in Classical Antiquity by Helen van Noorden. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):559-560.
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  44. added 2016-08-23
    Christopher Trinacty (2016). Lucius Annaeus Seneca: Letters on Ethics to Lucilius Trans. Margaret Graver and A. A. Long. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):573-575.
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  45. added 2016-08-23
    Charles D. Stein (2016). The Life and Death of Agamemnon’s Scepter: The Imagery of Achilles. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):447-463.
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  46. added 2016-08-23
    Robert Burton (1989). The Anatomy of Melancholy. Oxford University Press Uk.
    The Anatomy of Melancholy is one of the last great works of English prose to have remained unedited. These are the first two volumes of what will be an authoritative edition of the work, currently being prepared by scholars on both sides of the Atlantic.
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  47. added 2016-08-22
    Raymond Aaron Younis (forthcoming). On Recontsruction: On the Limits, Horizons and Possibilities of Critical Theory. In Harry Dahms & Eric Lybeck (eds.), On Reconstruction. Ashgate
  48. added 2016-08-22
    Emma Wilkins (forthcoming). ‘Exploding’ Immaterial Substances: Margaret Cavendish’s Vitalist-Materialist Critique of Spirits. British Journal for the History of Philosophy:1-20.
    ABSTRACTIn this paper, I explore Margaret Cavendish’s engagement with mid-seventeenth-century debates on spirits and spiritual activity in the world, especially the problems of incorporeal substance and magnetism. I argue that between 1664 and 1668, Cavendish developed an increasingly robust form of materialism in response to the deficiencies which she identified in alternative philosophical systems – principally mechanical philosophy and vitalism. This was an intriguing direction of travel, given the intensification in attacks on the supposedly atheistic materialism of Hobbes. While some (...)
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  49. added 2016-08-22
    Allison Merrick (2016). Of Genealogy and Transcendent Critique. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 47 (2):228-237.
    In a well-known passage of the Preface to On the Genealogy of Morals Nietzsche makes audible a “new demand”: namely, that “we need a critique of moral values, the value of these values themselves must be called into question—and for that there is needed a knowledge of the conditions and circumstances in which they grew, under which they changed and evolved”.1 Here Nietzsche is relatively clear. We need an understanding of the historical conditions under which our moral values have changed (...)
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  50. added 2016-08-22
    Mark Migotti (2016). History, Genealogy, Nietzsche: Comments on Jesse Prinz, "Genealogies of Morals: Nietzsche's Method Compared". Journal of Nietzsche Studies 47 (2):212-227.
    Jesse Prinz compares Nietzsche’s genealogy of morals to its utilitarian and materialist counterparts and gives two cheers for the Nietzschean approach.1 The project is well conceived; and—readers of this journal will not need to be convinced of this—the recognition of Nietzsche’s achievement is deserved and welcome. But when we get to “the particular go of it,”2 Prinz’s account of what Nietzsche’s achievement is, I have reservations. Though we have much to learn from his juxtaposing Nietzschean genealogy to its utilitarian and (...)
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