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  1. added 2014-08-27
    Kate Moran (forthcoming). Much Obliged: Kantian Gratitude Reconsidered. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie.
    In his published texts and lectures on moral philosophy, Kant repeatedly singles out gratitude for discussion. Nevertheless, puzzles about the derivation, content, and nature of this duty remain. This paper seeks to solve some of these puzzles. Centrally, I argue that it is essential to attend to a distinction that Kant makes between well-wishing benevolence (Wohlwollen) and active beneficence (Wohlthun) on the part of a benefactor. On the Kantian account, I argue, a different type of gratitude is owed in response (...)
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  2. added 2014-08-27
    Nora Hämäläinen (2014). What is a Wittgensteinian Neo-Platonist?–Iris Murdoch, Metaphysics and Metaphor. Philosophical Papers 43 (2):191-225.
    Philosophical Papers, Volume 43, Issue 2, Page 191-225, July 2014.
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  3. added 2014-08-25
    Joshua Wilburn (forthcoming). Courage and the Spirited Part of the Soul in Plato's Republic. Philosophers' Imprint.
    In this paper I argue that the Republic’s account of courage remains committed to the view that knowledge, or even true belief, about how it is best to act is sufficient for correct behavior. I thus defend continuity between the Republic’s account of courage and that found in the Protagoras. I suggest that in the Republic Plato attempts to identify a psychic source of stability for belief, the spirited part of the soul, whose function in the virtue of courage is (...)
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  4. added 2014-08-25
    Steven Burgess (2012). Resolving the Question of Doubt: Geometrical Demonstration in the Meditations. Society and Politics 6 (2):43-62.
    The question of what Descartes did and did not doubt in the Meditations has received a significant amount of scholarly attention in recent years. The process of doubt in Meditation I gives one the impression of a rather extreme form of skepticism, while the responses Descartes offers in the Objections and Replies make it clear that there is in fact a whole background of presuppositions that are never doubted, including many that are never even entertained as possible candidates of doubt. (...)
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  5. added 2014-08-25
    Karin de Boer (2012). Hegel’s Philosophy of Right: A Modern Criticism of Modernity? In Andreas Arndt (ed.), Hegel-Jahrbuch. 200-205.
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  6. added 2014-08-25
    Karin de Boer (2012). Democracy Out of Joint? The Financial Crisis in Light of Hegel’s Philosophy of Right. Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 66:36-53.
  7. added 2014-08-25
    Karin de Boer (2011). Différance as Negativity: The Hegelian Remains of Derrida’s Philosophy. In Stephen Houlgate & Michael Baur (eds.), Blackwell Companion to Hegel. Blackwell. 594-610.
  8. added 2014-08-25
    Karin de Boer (2011). Transformations of Transcendental Philosophy: Wolff, Kant, and Hegel. Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 32 (1-2):50-79.
    Shedding new light on Kant’s use of the term ‘transcendental’ in the Critique of Pure Reason, this article aims to determine the elements that Kant’s transcendental philosophy has in common with Wolffian ontology as well as the respects in which Kant turns against Wolff. On this basis I argue that Wolff’s, Kant’s and Hegel’s conceptions of metaphysics – qua first philosophy – have a deeper affinity than is commonly assumed. Bracketing the issue of Kant’s alleged subjectivism, I challenge the opposition (...)
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  9. added 2014-08-25
    Karin de Boer (2011). Kant, Hegel, and the System of Pure Reason. In Elena Ficara (ed.), Die Begründung der Philosophie im Deutschen Idealismus. Königshausen und Neumann. 77-87.
    Since the 1970s, debates about Hegel’s Science of Logic have largely turned around the metaphysical or non-metaphysical nature of this work. This debate has certainly issued many important contributions to Hegel scholarship. Yet it presupposes, in my view, a set of oppositions that thwart an adequate assessment of Hegel’s indebtedness to Kant. I hope to show in this paper that Hegel is deeply indebted to Kant, but not to the Kant who is commonly brought into play to argue for the (...)
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  10. added 2014-08-25
    Karin de Boer (2004). The Dissolving Force of the Concept: Hegel’s Ontological Logic. Review of Metaphysics 57 (4):787-822.
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  11. added 2014-08-23
    José Ortega Y. Gasset (1967). The Origin of Philosophy. W. W. Norton.
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  12. added 2014-08-22
    Christoph Jedan (2014). Cruciale Teksten: De Grieks-Romeinse Consolatio. Nederlands Theologisch Tijdschrift 68 (1 & 2):165-173.
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  13. added 2014-08-22
    Christoph Jedan (2010). Philosophy Superseded? The Doctrine of Free Will in the Pseudo-Clementine Recognitions. In Jan N. Bremmer (ed.), The Pseudo-Clementines. Peeters. 200-216.
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  14. added 2014-08-21
    Christoph Jedan (2014). Troost door argumenten: Herwaardering van een filosofische en christelijke traditie. Nederlands Theologisch Tijdschrift 68 (1 & 2).
    The article attempts to put the undervalued cultural phenomenon of offering comfort by means of persuasive speech acts (‘arguments’) on the research agenda of the human¬ities. The article proceeds in four steps. First, it defines ‘argumentative consolation’. Second, it argues that there has been a broad overlap of ancient philosophical and Christian modes of argumentative consolation. Third, it would be misguided to attribute today’s uneasiness with argumentative consolation to a process of ‘secularization’; the uneasiness stems from a radicalized intensification of (...)
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  15. added 2014-08-21
    David Simpson, Pascal, Blaise. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Blaise Pascal (1623–1662) Blaise Pascal was a French philosopher, mathematician, scientist, inventor, and theologian. In mathematics, he was an early pioneer in the fields of game theory and probability theory. In philosophy he was an early pioneer in existentialism. As a writer on theology and religion he was a defender of Christianity. Despite chronic ill […].
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  16. added 2014-08-21
    Christoph Jedan (2013). Metaphors of Closeness : Reflections on 'Homoiosis Theoi' in Ancient Philosophy and Beyond. Numen 60:54-70.
    It is often assumed that a single, diachronically persistent motif of imitating god can be identifijied in Ancient philosophy and early Christianity. The present article takes issue with this assumption and seeks to establish the conceptual framework for a more sophisticated discussion of homoiôsis. The article identifijies eight crucial junctures at which homoiôsis stories can diverge. For all the variance of homoiôsis narratives, the category of imitation of the divine remains a useful analytical tool. The article supports this claim by (...)
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  17. added 2014-08-21
    Christoph Jedan (2010). Die Dummen und der Weise : Zur dichotomischen Anthropologie der Stoiker. In Ludger Jansen & Christoph Jedan (eds.), Philosophische Anthropologie in der Antike. Ontos. 185-204.
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  18. added 2014-08-21
    Christoph Jedan (2010). Faustus: Epicurean and Stoic? On the Philosophical Sources of the Pseudo-Clementines. In Jan N. Bremmer (ed.), The Pseudo-Clementines. Peeters. 142-156.
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  19. added 2014-08-21
    Christoph Jedan (2010). Im Visier der Ärzte. Hippokrates und Galen über die Natur des Menschen. In Ludger Jansen & Christoph Jedan (eds.), Philosophische Anthropologie in der Antike. Ontos. 311-340.
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  20. added 2014-08-21
    Christoph Jedan (2010). Göttliches und menschliches Handeln in der frühen Stoa. In Jörn Müller & Roberto Hofmeister Pich (eds.), Wille und Handlung in der Philosophie der Kaiserzeit und Spätantike. De Gruyter Mouton. 25-44.
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  21. added 2014-08-21
    Christoph Jedan (2000). Willensfreiheit bei Aristoteles? Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht.
    ein späteres Konstrukt. Dementsprechend sei es, wenn schon kein Willensbegriff bei Aristoteles vorliege, trivialerweise unmöglich, bei Aristoteles eine Willensfreiheit zu entdecken.2 Dieser Einwand könnte sich etwa, wie A. Dihle es getan hat, ...
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  22. added 2014-08-20
    Catherine Rowett (2014). The Pythagorean Society and Politics. In Carl Huffman (ed.), A History of Pythagoreanism. Cambridge University Press. 112-130.
    Pythagoreans dominated the political scene in southern Italy for nearly a century in the late 6th to 5th century BC. What was the secret of their political success and can their political, social and economic policies be assessed in the customary terms with which historians try to analyse ancient societies? I argue that they cannot, and that the Pythagorean approach to politics was sui generis, and successful because it was based on ideas, not force or popular demagogy.
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  23. added 2014-08-20
    Catherine Rowett (2013). Relativism in Plato's Protagoras. In Verity Harte & Melissa Lane (eds.), Politeia in Greek and Roman Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 191-211.
    The character Protagoras in Plato's Protagoras holds similar views to the one in the Theaetetus, and faces similar problems. The dialogue considers issues in epistemology and moral epistemology, as a central theme. The Protagorean position is immune from Socrates' attacks, and Socrates needs Protagorean methods to make any impact.
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  24. added 2014-08-20
    Catherine Rowett (2013). Plato, Wittgenstein and the Definition of Games. In Luigi Perissinotto & Begoña Ramón Cámara (eds.), Wittgenstein and Plato: connections, comparisons and contrasts. Palgrave. 196-219.
    In this paper I argue, controversially, that Plato's Meno anticipates Wittgenstein's critique of essentialism. Plato is usually read as an essentialist of the very kind that Wittgenstein was challenging, and the Meno in particular is usually taken as evidence that Plato thought that to know something you must be able to define it, and that if you can't define it you can't investigate any other questions on the topic. I suggest instead that Plato shows Socrates proposing such a position (much (...)
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  25. added 2014-08-20
    Catherine Rowett (2013). Philosophy's Numerical Turn: Why the Pythagoreans' Interest in Numbers is Truly Awesome. In Dirk Obbink & David Sider (eds.), Doctrine and Doxography: Studies on Heraclitus and Pythagoras. De Gruyter. 3-32.
    Philosophers are generally somewhat wary of the hints of number mysticism in the reports about the beliefs and doctrines of the so-called Pythagoreans. It's not clear how much Pythagoras himself (as opposed to his later followers) indulged in speculation about numbers, or in more serious mathematics. But the Pythagoreans whom Aristotle discusses in the Metaphysics had some elaborate stories to tell about how the universe could be explained in terms of numbers—not just its physics but perhaps morality too. Was this (...)
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  26. added 2014-08-20
    Catherine Rowett (2013). Literary Genres and Judgements of Taste: Some Remarks on Aristotle's Remarks About the Poetry of Empedocles. In Erler Michael (ed.), Argument und literarische Form in antiker Philosophie. De Gruyter. 305-314.
    In this paper I review four texts in which Aristotle comments on Empedocles' writing style. I show that Aristotle thought that Empedocles was a fine poet. That is fine, if a poet is what you want.
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  27. added 2014-08-20
    John Philoponus & Catherine Osborne (2009). On Aristotle's Physics 1.4-6. Duckworth.
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  28. added 2014-08-19
    Ugo di Toro (ed.) (2010). L'enigma Parmenide. Poesia e filosofia nel proemio. Aracne.
  29. added 2014-08-19
    Ugo di Toro (2007). Tempo dell'uomo e tempo del filosofo nel Ta eis heauton di Marco Aurelio. In Leo Marchetti & Paola Evangelista (eds.), La musica delle stagioni. Fenomenologia del tempo nelle letterature inglese e italiana. Liguori. 131-150.
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  30. added 2014-08-18
    Casey Rentmeester (2014). Leibniz and Huayan Buddhism: Monads as Modified Li? Lyceum 13 (1):36-57.
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  31. added 2014-08-18
    W. Grassl & B. Smith (eds.) (1986). Austrian Economics: Historical and Philosophical Background. Helm Croom.
  32. added 2014-08-17
    David Fate Norton (1988). John Wilson: Hume's First Printer. British Library Journal 14:123-135.
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  33. added 2014-08-17
    James Noxon (1988). Alternative Readings: Hume and His Commentators. In S. Tweyman (ed.), Early Modern Philosophy II. Caravan Books.
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  34. added 2014-08-17
    David Fate Norton (1987). Baron Hume's Request: The Hume Manuscripts and Their First Use. Royal Society of Edinburgh.
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  35. added 2014-08-17
    David Pears (1986). The Naturalism of Book 1 of Hume's Treatise of Human Nature. In Kenny (ed.), Rationalism, Empiricism and Idealism. Clarendon.
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  36. added 2014-08-16
    Ann A. Pang-White (2011). Friendship and Happiness: Why Matter Matters in Augustine's Confessions. In Richard C. Taylor David Twetten & Michael Wreen (eds.), Tolle Lege: Essays on Augustine & on Medieval Philosophy in Honor of Roland J. Teske. Marquette University Press. 175-195.
    This paper presents a refreshing new reading of Augustine's view on matter. It argues that Augustine's evolving view on matter from the negative to the positive, from the overly simplistic understanding of matter as something purely physical to a nuanced view of spiritual matter, played an essential role in the Confessions. Matter, in this new understanding, accounts for both space and time. As Augustine matured as a thinker, he saw matter's potentiality also positively as possibility for grace for the embodied (...)
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  37. added 2014-08-16
    Ann Pang-White (1994). Augustine on Divine Foreknowledge and Human Free Will. Revue Des Études Augustiniennes 40:417-431.
  38. added 2014-08-15
    Dorit Barchana‐Lorand (2014). Educating Sentiment: Hume's Contribution to the Philosophy of the Curriculum Regarding the Teaching of Art. Journal of Philosophy of Education 48 (3).
    From the perspective of art education, the worst-case philosophical scenario is the hedonist-subjectivist account of art. If we measure art by the pleasure we gain from it, it may seem senseless to attempt teaching the reception of art. David Hume's ‘Of the Standard of Taste’ provides an argument for the art-education enthusiast, explaining that—even on a subjectivist account—art education crystallises our own preferences. While I refer to a historical debate and provide a close reading of an 18th-century essay, my goal (...)
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  39. added 2014-08-14
    Maria Rosa Antognazza (forthcoming). Theory and Praxis in Leibniz’s Theological Thought. In Irena Backus, Wenchao Li & Hartmut Rudolph (eds.), G. W. Leibniz im Lichte der Theologien [Leibniz in the Light of Theology]. Steiner.
    This paper re-assesses the place of theology in Leibniz’s thought focusing on the relationship between theory and praxis. It takes as its point of departure a general conclusion established in previous work, namely that Leibniz’s key formulations of his overarching plan for the reform and advancement of all the sciences, are devoted to a set of objectives which is both shaped by broadly theological concerns and ultimately practical. Against this backdrop, the discussion will then turn to an exploration of how (...)
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  40. added 2014-08-12
    Juliet Floyd (1995). On Saying What You Really Want to Say: Wittgenstein, Gödel and the Trisection of the Angle. In Jaakko Hintikka (ed.), From Dedekind to Gödel: The Foundations of Mathematics in the Early Twentieth Century, Synthese Library Vol. 251 (Kluwer Academic Publishers. 373-426.
  41. added 2014-08-11
    William A. Edmundson, Fair Value and Ownership of the Means of Production.
    John Rawls argued that welfare-state capitalism would be rejected by a constitutional convention seeking to implement the abstract principles of justice chosen in the original position. But neither property-owning democracy nor liberal democratic socialism could be ruled out at the constitutional stage, and the choice between them was to be made at the further, legislative stage of the four-stage sequence he outlined for the achievement of political justice. -/- Rawls rejected welfare-state capitalism because it does not guarantee, or even try (...)
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  42. added 2014-08-11
    Jörg Schaub (forthcoming). The Incompleteness of Ideal Theory. Res Publica:1-27.
    Can one give an account of a perfectly just society without invoking principles governing our responses to injustice? My claim is that addressing this question puts us in a position to reveal ambiguities and problems with the way in which Rawls draws the ideal/nonideal theory distinction that have so far gone unnoticed. In the first part of my paper, I demonstrate that Rawls’s original definition of the ideal/nonideal theory distinction is ambiguous as it is composed of two different conceptual distinctions, (...)
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  43. added 2014-08-11
    Marcus Arvan (forthcoming). Justice as Fairness in a Broken World. Philosophy and Public Issues.
    In Ethics for a Broken World: Imagining Philosophy after Catastrophe, Tim Mulgan applies a number of influential moral and political theories to a “broken world”: a world of environmental catastrophe in which resources are insufficient to meet everyone’s basic needs. This paper shows that John Rawls’ conception of justice as fairness has very different implications for a broken world than Mulgan suggests it does. §1 briefly summarizes Rawls’ conception of justice, including how Rawls uses a hypothetical model – the “original (...)
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  44. added 2014-08-11
    Svein Eng (2014). Why Reflective Equilibrium? III: Reflective Equilibrium as a Heuristic Tool. Ratio Juris 27 (3):440-459.
    In A Theory of Justice (1971), John Rawls introduces the concept of “reflective equilibrium.” Although there are innumerable references to and discussions of this concept in the literature, there is, to the present author's knowledge, no discussion of the most important question: Why reflective equilibrium? In particular, the question arises: Is the method of reflective equilibrium applicable to the choice of this method itself? Rawls's drawing of parallels between Kant's moral theory and his own suggests that his concept of “reflective (...)
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  45. added 2014-08-11
    Lydia B. Amir (2014). Shaftesbury—An Important Forgotten Indirect Source of Kierkegaard's Thought. Kierkegaard Studies Yearbook 19 (1).
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  46. added 2014-08-11
    Ronnie Littlejohn (2014). The Environmental Ethics of Fan Ruiping's Revisionist Confucianism. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (3):403-406.
    Fan Ruiping is engaged in a wide-ranging project to reconstruct Confucianism for the contemporary period. It includes his sustained attack on John Rawls’ theory of distributive justice, various Chinese policies and practices on the delivery of health and elder care, and global business ethics. This paper describes his revised Confucian understanding of environmental morality under the metaphor of nature as garden and man as gardener. I argue the current state of this effort is in need of a more robust appropriation (...)
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  47. added 2014-08-11
    Review by: Susanne Sreedhar (2014). Review: David Dyzenhaus and Thomas Poole Eds., Hobbes and the Law. [REVIEW] Ethics 124 (4):894-899,.
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  48. added 2014-08-11
    Phil Ryan (2014). Stout, Rawls, and the Idea of Public Reason. Journal of Religious Ethics 42 (3):540-562.
    Jeffrey Stout claims that John Rawls's idea of public reason (IPR) has contributed to a Christian backlash against liberalism. This essay argues that those whom Stout calls “antiliberal traditionalists” have misunderstood Rawls in important ways, and goes on to consider Stout's own critiques of the IPR. While Rawls's idea is often interpreted as a blanket prohibition on religious reasoning outside church and home, the essay will show that the very viability of the IPR depends upon a rich culture of deliberation (...)
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  49. added 2014-08-11
    Klemen Jaklic (2014). Liberal Legitimacy and the Question of Respect. Ratio Juris 27 (3):409-439.
    In a modern pluralist society, the idea of liberal legitimacy as proposed by John Rawls offers a promising foundation for the further historic advancement of democracy. However, liberal legitimacy still seems to lack one key element—a unique type of respect at its foundations—without which such democratic advancement may not be achieved. Nor, on closer inspection, could the idea of liberal legitimacy succeed without this particular type of respect. When further refined at its foundation, arguably liberal legitimacy could open doors to (...)
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  50. added 2014-08-10
    Richard T. Murphy (1991). Husserl and Hume: Overcrowding Scepticism? Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 22:30-44.
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