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  1. Julia Annas (1980). Aristotle on Pleasure and Goodness. In Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (ed.), Essays on Aristotle's Ethics. University of California Press. 285--99.
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  2. Lorraine Marie Arangno (2013). Pleasure: 'The Choice of Hercules'. The European Legacy 18 (2):197-208.
    In this article I contend that John Stuart Mill's Utilitarianism has been widely misunderstood, and hence the importance of his philosophical project has been diminished. This misunderstanding arises primarily from misconceptions regarding Mill's definition of pleasure. However, these misconceptions may be successfully resolved by reflecting on Mill's educational roots and his commitment to Greco-Roman philosophy. In particular, I hold that a deeper understanding of Mill's philosophical progenitors (i.e., Aristotle and Epicurus) would lead us to conclude that for Mill the 'pleasures' (...)
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  3. Aristotle (2011). The Eudemian Ethics. OUP Oxford.
    'We are looking for the things that enable us to live a noble and happy life...and what prospects decent people will have of acquiring any of them.' -/- The Eudemian Ethics is a major treatise on moral philosophy whose central concern is what makes life worth living. Aristotle considers the role of happiness, and what happiness consists of, and he analyses various factors that contribute to it: human agency, the relation between action and virtue, and the concept of virtue itself. (...)
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  4. Gwenaëlle Aubry (2009). Nicomachean Ethics VII. 14 (1154a22-B34) : The Pain of the Living and Divine Pleasure. In Carlo Natali (ed.), Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics. Oxford University Press.
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  5. Joachim Aufderheide (2013). Processes as Pleasures in EN Vii 11-14. Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):135-157.
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  6. Joachim Aufderheide (2013). Processes as Pleasures in EN Vii 11-14 - a New Approach. Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):135-157.
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  7. Joachim Aufderheide (2012). The Ethics (M.) Weinman Pleasure in Aristotle's Ethics. Pp. X + 157. London and New York: Continuum, 2007. Cased, £70, US$135. ISBN: 978-0-8264-9604-1. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 62 (1):82-83.
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  8. Emily A. Austin (2012). Fools and Malicious Pleasure in Plato's Philebus. History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (2):125-139.
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  9. Scott Berman (1991). Socrates and Callicles on Pleasure. Phronesis 36 (2):117 - 140.
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  10. Kathleen Blake (2009). Pleasures of Benthamism: Victorian Literature, Utility, Political Economy. OUP Oxford.
    This book offers a fresh look at the often-censured but imperfectly understood traditions of Utilitarianism and political economy in their bearing for Victorian literature and culture. It treats writings by Jeremy Bentham, Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, David Ricardo, James and John Stuart Mill, Charles Dickens, Thomas Carlyle, Anthony Trollope, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Rabindranath Tagore. It sets texts in historical context, examines style as well as ideas, and aims to widen awareness of commonalities across seemingly divided expressions of the (...)
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  11. Troy Booher, J.S. Mill's Test for Higher Pleasure.
    of (from Studies in the History of Ethics).
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  12. Johan Brannmark (2006). Like the Bloom on Youths' : How Pleasure Completes Our Lives. In T. D. J. Chappell (ed.), Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics. Oxford University Press.
  13. Shaoming Chen (2010). On Pleasure: A Reflection on Happiness From the Confucian and Daoist Perspectives. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (2):179-195.
    This paper discusses the structural relationship between ideals on pleasure and pleasure as a human psychological phenomenon in Chinese thought. It describes the psychological phenomenon of pleasure, and compares different approaches by pre-Qin Confucian and Daoist scholars. It also analyzes its development in Song and Ming Confucianism. Finally, in the conclusion, the issue is transferred to a general understanding of happiness, so as to demonstrate the modern value of the classical ideological experience.
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  14. Samuel Clark (2012). Pleasure as Self-Discovery. Ratio 25 (3):260-276.
    This paper uses readings of two classic autobiographies, Edmund Gosse's Father & Son and John Stuart Mill's Autobiography, to develop a distinctive answer to an old and central question in value theory: What role is played by pleasure in the most successful human life? A first section defends my method. The main body of the paper then defines and rejects voluntarist, stoic, and developmental hedonist lessons to be taken from central crises in my two subjects' autobiographies, and argues for a (...)
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  15. Shiri Cohen (2013). Kathleen Blake, The Pleasures of Benthamism (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009), Pp. 267. Utilitas 25 (2):287-290.
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  16. Spyridon George Couvalis & Matthew L. Usher, Plato on False Pains and False Pleasures.
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  17. W. Joseph Cummins (1984). The Greeks on Pleasure. Journal of the History of Philosophy 22 (3):366-368.
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  18. E. M. Dadlez (forthcoming). Pleased and Afflicted: Hume on the Paradox of Tragic Pleasure. Hume Studies 30 (2):213-236.
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  19. Stephen L. Darwall (1974). Pleasure as Ultimate Good in Sidgwick's Ethics. The Monist 58 (3):475-489.
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  20. Susanne Davies (2007). Book Review: Sex and Pleasure in Western Culture. [REVIEW] Thesis Eleven 88 (1):136-139.
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  21. Deborah De Chiara-Quenzer (1993). A Method for Pleasure and Reason: Plato's Philebus. Apeiron 26 (1).
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  22. Manuel C. Ortiz de Landázuri (2012). Aristotle on Self-Perception and Pleasure. Journal of Ancient Philosophy 6 (2).
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  23. Neil de Marchi (2006). Smith on Ingenuity, Pleasure, and the Imitative Arts. In Knud Haakonssen (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Adam Smith. Cambridge University Press.
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  24. Carolyn J. Dean (1992). The Self and its Pleasures: Bataille, Lacan, and the History of the Decentered Subject. Cornell University Press.
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  25. Sylvain Delcomminette (2007). Russell (D.) Plato on Pleasure and the Good Life. Pp. X + 272. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 2005. Cased, £45. ISBN: 978-0-19-928284-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 57 (01):40-.
  26. Irina Deretić (2009). Yuch as Biblion: Cognitive Dispositions and Pleasures at Philebus 38e12-40c. Theoria 52 (2):69-80.
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  27. Panos Dimas (2008). Good and Pleasure in the Protagoras. Ancient Philosophy 28 (2):253-284.
  28. Dale Dorsey (2013). The Authority of Competence and Quality as Extrinsic. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (1):78 - 99.
    (2013). The Authority of Competence and Quality as Extrinsic. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 21, No. 1, pp. 78-99. doi: 10.1080/09608788.2012.689752.
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  29. Jamie Dow (2011). Aristotle's Theory of the Emotions : Emotions as Pleasures and Pains. In Michael Pakaluk & Giles Pearson (eds.), Moral Psychology and Human Action in Aristotle. Oxford University Press.
  30. R. S. Downie (1966). Mill on Pleasure and Self-Development. Philosophical Quarterly 16 (62):69-71.
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  31. By Julia Driver (2004). Pleasure as the Standard of Virtue in Hume's Moral Philosophy. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 85 (2):173–194.
    But in many orders of beauty, particularly those of the finer arts, it is requisite to employ much reasoning, in order to feel the proper sentiment; and a false relish may frequently be corrected by argument and reflection. There are just grounds to conclude, that moral beauty partakes much of this latter species, and demands the assistance of our intellectual faculties, in order to give it a suitable influence on the human mind (EPM, 173).
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  32. J. Dybikowski (1970). False Pleasure and the "Philebus". Phronesis 15 (2):147 - 165.
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  33. J. Dybikowski (1970). False Pleasure and the Philebus. Phronesis 15 (1):147-165.
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  34. James C. Dybikowski (1970). Mixed and False Pleasure in the Philebus: A Reply. Philosophical Quarterly 20 (80):244-247.
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  35. Benjamin Dykes (2002). A Platonic Response to Foucault's Use of Pleasure. Ancient Philosophy 22 (1):103-123.
  36. Walter Englert (1992). Epicurus' Ethical Theory: The Pleasures of Invulnerability. [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 12 (2):487-492.
  37. Mehmet M. Erginel (2006). Plato on a Mistake About Pleasure. Southern Journal of Philosophy 44 (3):447-468.
    Plato argues in Republic IX that people are often mistaken about their own pleasures and pains. One of the mistakes he focuses on isjudging that an experience of ours is pleasant when, in fact, it is not. The view that such a mistake is possible is an unpopular one, andscholars have generally been dismissive of Plato’s position. Thus Urmson argues not only that this position is deeply flawed, but alsothat it results from a confusion on Plato’s part. In this paper, (...)
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  38. K. T. Fann (1967). Aristotle's Conception of Pleasure. Southern Journal of Philosophy 5 (3):160-166.
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  39. Susan L. Feagin (1983). Mill and Edwards on the Higher Pleasures. Philosophy 58 (224):244 - 252.
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  40. M. Lorenz Moises J. Festin (2008). Rediscovering the Sense of Pleasure in Morality. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 10:101-108.
    Pleasure has always been an important issue in morality. And although ethical systems tend to focus the discussion on human action, this agreeable sentiment has remained a recurrent question in moral philosophy. In this paper, I go back to Aristotle’s treatment of pleasure in his writings, particularly in the Nicomachean Ethics. I will argue that the distinction he draws between bodily pleasures and those of the mind represents an important point not only in understanding eudaimonia but also in situating the (...)
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  41. G. C. Field (1946). Plato's Examination of Pleasure. A Translation of the Philebus, with Introduction and Commentary. By R. Hackforth, M.A. (Cambridge: At The University Press, 1945. Pp. Vii + 144. Price 10s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 21 (79):182-.
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  42. Andrew O. Fort (1988). Beyond Pleasure: Śankara on Bliss. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 16 (2):177-189.
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  43. Don Fowler (1993). Review Article II: Epicureanism. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 113:169.
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  44. Adam Fox (1945/1977). Plato for Pleasure. Folcroft Library Editions.
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  45. Dorothea Frede (2009). Nicomachean Ethics VIII. 11-12: Pleasure. In Carlo Natali (ed.), Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics, Book Vii: Symposium Aristotelicum. Oxford University Press.
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  46. Dorothea Frede (2009). Nicomachean Ethics VII. 11-12 : Pleasure. In Carlo Natali (ed.), Aristotle: Nicomachean Ethics. Oxford University Press.
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  47. Dorothea Frede (2006). Pleasure and Pain in Aristotle's Ethics. In Richard Kraut (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Blackwell Pub.. 255--275.
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  48. Dorothea Frede (1985). Rumpelstiltskin's Pleasures: True and False Pleasures in Plato's" Philebus". Phronesis 30 (2):151 - 180.
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  49. Dorothea Frede (1985). Rumpelstiltskin's Pleasures: True and False Pleasures in Plato's Philebus. Phronesis 30 (2):151-180.
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  50. Cynthia A. Freeland (1985). The Greeks on Pleasure J. C. B. Gosling, C. C. W. Taylor: The Greeks on Pleasure. Pp. Xii + 497. Oxford University Press, 1982. £ 22.50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 35 (01):77-79.
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