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  1. C. Adair-Toteff (1998). Kant on Platonic Scepticism. Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 9.
  2. Macksood A. Aftab (2005). Primer on Islam and the Problem of Causation, Induction, and Skepticism. Journal of Islamic Philosophy 1 (1):95-100.
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  3. Sara Ahbel-Rappe (1998). Scepticism in the Sixth Century? Damascius' Doubts and Solutions Concerning First Principles. Journal of the History of Philosophy 36 (3):337-363.
    Scepticism in the Sixth Century? Damascius' Doubts and Solutions Concerning First Principles SARA RAPPE THE Doubts and Solutions Concerning First Principles, an aporetic work of the sixth century Neoplatonist Damascius, is distinguished above all by its dialectical subtlety. Although the Doubts and Solutions belongs to the commentary tradi- tion on Plato's Parmenides, its structure and method make it in many ways unique among such exegetical works. The treatise positions itself, at least in part, as a response to Proclus' metaphysical system. (...)
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  4. James Allen (2010). Pyrrhonism and Medicine. In Richard Arnot Home Bett (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Ancient Scepticism. Cambridge University Press 232.
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  5. Ilyas Altuner (2011). Transition From Doubt to Knowledge and Comprehension of the Mind Itself in Descartes’ Philosophy. Beytulhikme An International Journal of Philosophy 1 (1):94-109.
    Descartes uses skepticism as a method in the search for truth and afterwards he arrives at the knowledge of truth by conception cogito, which is an intuitive proposition. Comprehension of the mind itself is asserted from which ego cannot be cut from thinking, and this conception is based on the existence of God who does exist to be contained in the mind conceptually. God is stated the most perfect being which does rescue mind from doubt and show its real being (...)
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  6. J. Annas (1996). R.J. Hankinson: The Sceptics, (The Arguments of the Philosophers). London, New York: Routledge, 1995. The Classical Review 46 (1):75-76.
  7. Julia Annas (1996). Scepticism, Old and New. In Michael Frede & Gisela Striker (eds.), Rationality in Greek Thought. Oxford University Press 239--54.
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  8. Julia Annas (1985). The Modes of Scepticism: Ancient Texts and Modern Interpretations. Cambridge University Press.
    The Modes of Scepticism is one of the most important and influential of all ancient philosophical texts. The texts made an enormous impact on Western thought when they were rediscovered in the 16th century and they have shaped the whole future course of Western philosophy. Despite their importance, the Modes have been little discussed in recent times. This book translates the texts and supplies them with a discursive commentary, concentrating on philosophical issues but also including historical material. The book will (...)
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  9. Julia Annas & Jacques Brunschwig (1990). Platon le sceptique. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 95 (2):267 - 291.
    The article discusses the sceptical New Academy's interpretation of Plato as a sceptic. The first part discusses Arcesilaus' reintroduction of Socratic method, and the reading of the Socratic dialogues and the Theaetetus implied by this. The second part discusses arguments probably used by the later, more moderate Academy for a reading of Plato's more dogmatic dialogues in a way consistent with scepticism.
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  10. Jean-Robert Armogathe (2010). Skepsis. Le débat Des modernes sur le scepticisme. Montaigne, le vayer, Campanella, Hobbes, Descartes, Bayle (review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 48 (2):pp. 241-243.
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  11. Jean-Robert Armogathe (2004). Dubium Perfectissimum : The Skepticism of the "Subtle Arriaga". In Maia Neto, José Raimundo & Richard H. Popkin (eds.), Skepticism in Renaissance and Post-Renaissance Thought: New Interpretations. Humanity Books
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  12. N. Scott Arnold (1987). Hume's Skepticism in the Treatise of Human Nature. Journal of the History of Philosophy 25 (3):450-452.
  13. Augustine (1957). Against the Academicians. Milwaukee, Marquette University Press.
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  14. Augustine (1942). Saint Augustine Against the Academicians. Milwaukee, Wis.,Marquette University Press.
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  15. Scott Austin (2000). Scepticism and Dogmatism in the Presocratics. Apeiron 33 (3):239 - 246.
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  16. Murat Aydede (1998). Aristotle on Episteme and Nous: The Posterior Analytics. Southern Journal of Philosophy 36 (1):15-46.
    According to the standard and largely traditional interpretation, Aristotle’s conception of nous, at least as it occurs in the Posterior Analytics, is geared against a certain set of skeptical worries about the possibility of scientific knowledge, and ultimately of the knowledge of Aristotelian first principles. On this view, Aristotle introduces nous as an intuitive faculty that grasps the first principles once and for all as true in such a way that it does not leave any room for the skeptic to (...)
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  17. Michael Ayers (2004). Popkin's Revised Scepticism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (2):319 – 332.
  18. H. B. (1970). The Theory of Knowledge of Giambattista Vico. Review of Metaphysics 24 (2):341-342.
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  19. J. Barnes (1998). Essays on Hellenistic Epistemology and Ethics. G Striker. The Classical Review 48 (2):355-356.
  20. Jonathan Barnes (2014). Proof, Knowledge, and Scepticism: Essays in Ancient Philosophy Iii. OUP Oxford.
    Proof, Knowledge, and Scepticism is the third volume of Jonathan Barnes' papers on ancient philosophy. It contains twenty-two pieces on epistemological matters, some of them revised, and one or two which appear for the first time in English. Anyone with an interest in ancient philosophy will find them enriching and amusing.
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  21. Jonathan Barnes (1988). Scepticism and Relativity. Philosophical Studies 32:1-31.
  22. Jonathan Barnes (1988). Scepticism and the Arts. Apeiron 21 (2):53 - 77.
  23. Jonathan Barnes (1986). The Fourth Academy Harold Tarrant: Scepticism or Platonism? The Philosophy of the Fourth Academy. (Cambridge Classical Studies.) Pp. Ix+182. Cambridge University Press, 1985. £19.50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 36 (01):75-77.
  24. Peter J. Bart (1930). The Greek Sceptics. New Scholasticism 4 (2):227-230.
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  25. Charles E. Bashaw (2001). Montaigne and the Skeptical Tradition. Dissertation, The University of Wisconsin - Madison
    The "skeptical crisis" of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries is widely believed to have been brought on by the Protestant Reformation and fueled primarily by the "rediscovery" of ancient skeptical teachings, particularly those found in the second-century writings attributed to Sextus Empiricus. In truth, however, the basic arguments of the ancient skeptics were known throughout the Middle Ages, and the flowering of skepticism in the early modern period was essentially the reaffirmation of a long-standing Christian commitment to the primacy of (...)
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  26. Raymond A. Belliotti (2009). Roman Philosophy and the Good Life. Lexington Books.
    Introduction: The philosophical schools -- The skeptical academy : Cicero -- Stoicism I : Cato -- Epicureanism : Lucretius, Caesar, and Cassius -- The Ides of March -- Stoicism II : Seneca, Musonius Rufus, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius -- Appendices.
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  27. George Berkeley (2007). Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous in Opposition to Sceptics and Atheists. In Elizabeth Schmidt Radcliffe, Richard McCarty, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Late Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary. Blackwell Pub. Ltd.
  28. George Berkeley (1974). A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge ; Three Dialogues Between Hylas and Philonous, in Opposition to Sceptics and Atheists. In John Locke, George Berkeley & David Hume (eds.), The Empiricists. Anchor Books/Doubleday
  29. José Luis Bermúdez (2000). The Originality of Cartesian Skepticism: Did It Have Ancient or Mediaeval Antecedents? History of Philosophy Quarterly 17 (4):333 - 360.
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  30. S. Berryman (1998). Euclid and the Sceptic: A Paper on Vision, Doubt, Geometry, Light and Drunkenness. Phronesis 43 (2):176 - 196.
    Philosophy in the period immediately after Aristotle is sometimes thought to be marked by the decline of natural philosophy and philosophical disinterest in contemporary achievements in the sciences. But in one area at least, the early third century B.C.E. was a time of productive interaction between such disparate fields as epistemology, physics and geometry. Debates between the sceptics and the dogmatic philosophical schools focus on epistemological problems about the possibility of self-evident appearances, but there is evidence from Euclid's day of (...)
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  31. Richard Bett (2007). Sceptic Optics? Apeiron 40 (1):95 - 121.
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  32. Richard Bett (1994). Sextus's Against the Ethicists: Scepticism, Relativism or Both? Apeiron 27 (2):123 - 161.
  33. Richard Bett (1993). Scepticism and Everyday Attitudes in Ancient and Modern Philosophy. Metaphilosophy 24 (4):363-381.
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  34. Richard Bett (1993). Greek Scepticism. Ancient Philosophy 13 (1):243-252.
  35. Richard Arnot Home Bett (2000). Pyrrho, His Antecedents, and His Legacy. Oxford University Press.
    Richard Bett presents a ground-breaking study of Pyrrho of Elis, who lived in the late fourth and early third centuries BC and is the supposed originator of Greek scepticism. In the absence of surviving works by Pyrrho, scholars have tended to treat his thought as essentially the same as the long subsequent sceptical tradition which styled itself "Pyrrhonism." Bett argues, on the contrary, that Pyrrho's philosophy was significantly different from this later tradition, and offers the first detailed account of that (...)
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  36. Edwyn Robert Bevan (1979). Stoics and Sceptics. Arno Press.
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  37. Newton Bignotto (2009). Part Two: Early Modern Thinkers Close to Skepticism. Skeptical Aspects of Francesco Guicciardini's Thought. In Maia Neto, José Raimundo, Gianni Paganini & John Christian Laursen (eds.), Skepticism in the Modern Age: Building on the Work of Richard Popkin. Brill
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  38. Telma Souza Birchadel (2008). A figura do filósofo: ceticismo e subjetividade em Montaigne. Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 49 (117):243-248.
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  39. Thomas Blackson (2005). In Defense of an Unpopular Interpretation of Ancient Skepticism. Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 8.
    There is a set of texts in the history of ancient skepticism that have not been widely understood. Michael Frede has done much to set these texts in their proper context, but his work has not gotten the appreciation it deserves. Historians have tended to think that ancient skepticism in the Clitomachian-Pyrrhonian tradition is the suspension of belief on all matters and that Frede’s attempt to show otherwise is confused. This may turn out to be correct, but Frede’s interpretation, as (...)
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  40. Richard J. Blackwell (1962). The History of Scepticism From Erasmus to Descartes. Modern Schoolman 39 (4):391-393.
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  41. Susanne Bobzien (2015). Time: M 10.169-247 - Notes On Sceptical Method and Doxographical Transmission in Sextus Empiricus' Chapters on Time. In Keimpe Algra & Katerina Ierodiakonou (eds.), Sextus Empiricus and ancient physics. Cambridge University Press
    ABSTRACT: For the most part, this paper is not a philosophical paper in any strict sense. Rather, it focuses on the numerous exegetical puzzles in Sextus Empiricus’ two main passages on time (M X.l69-247 and PH III.l36-50), which, once sorted, help to explain how Sextus works and what the views are which he examines. Thus the paper provides an improved base from which to put more specifically philosophical questions to the text. The paper has two main sections, which can, by (...)
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  42. James Bogen (1974). Wittgenstein and Skepticism. Philosophical Review 83 (3):364-373.
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  43. Charles Bolyard (2006). Augustine, Epicurus, and External World Skepticism. Journal of the History of Philosophy 44 (2):157-168.
    : In Contra Academicos 3.11.24, Augustine responds to skepticism about the existence of the external world by arguing that what appears to be the world — as he terms things, the "quasi-earth" and "quasi-sky" — cannot be doubted. While some (e.g., M. Burnyeat and G. Matthews) interpret this passage as a subjectivist response to global skepticism, it is here argued that Augustine's debt to Epicurean epistemology and theology, especially as presented in Cicero's De Natura Deorum 1.25.69 - 1.26.74, provides the (...)
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  44. Núria Sara Miras Boronat, Die Welt Als Grund: Wittgenstein, Gadamer Und James. Akten des XXII. Deutscher Kongress für Philosophie.
  45. Richard Bosley (2002). Sources of Skepticism and Dogmatism in Ancient Philosophy East and West. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 29 (3):397–413.
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  46. Inga Bostad (2011). The Life and Learning of Arne Naess: Scepticism as a Survival Strategy. Inquiry 54 (1):42-51.
    ABSTRACT It is obvious that Arne Naess had his most important philosophical experience, and quite possibly made his most significant achievement, in confrontation with the variety of philosophical scepticism known as Pyrrhonism. Naess maintained, however, that he did not defend scepticism as a philosophical position, and he was concerned to distinguish Pyrrhonism from the inverse form of dogmatism often associated with the term ?scepticism?. Naess was primarily preoccupied with the practical implications of this radical form of scepticism, in which he (...)
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  47. Aryeh Botwinick (1997). Skepticism, Belief, and the Modern: Maimonides to Nietzsche. Cornell University Press.
  48. M. A. Box (2004). Scepticism and Literature. [REVIEW] Hume Studies 30 (1):204-207.
  49. George Boys-Stones (2000). SCEPTICISM R. J. Hankinson: The Sceptics . Pp. Viii + 376. London and New York: Routledge, 1998 (First Published 1995). Paper, £17.99. ISBN: 0-415-18446-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (01):155-.
  50. George Boys-Stones (1997). Sceptical Ethics. The Classical Review 47 (02):292-.
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