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From Saint Augustine to the early classical liberals, toleration is as discussed by theorists as it was for the changing world.  In this subcategory, we have discussions of both.

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  1. Yoshiya Abe (forthcoming). From Prohibition to Toleration: Japanese Government Views Regarding Christianity, 1854-73. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies.
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  2. Arash Abizadeh (2013). Publicity, Privacy, and Religious Toleration in Hobbes's Leviathan. Modern Intellectual History 10 (2):261-291.
    What motivated an absolutist Erastian who rejected religious freedom, defended uniform public worship, and deemed the public expression of disagreement a catalyst for war to endorse a movement known to history as the champion of toleration, no coercion in religion, and separation of church and state? At least three factors motivated Hobbes’s 1651 endorsement of Independency: the Erastianism of Cromwellian Independency, the influence of the politique tradition, and, paradoxically, the contribution of early-modern practices of toleration to maintaining the public sphere’s (...)
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  3. A. Alshoala (1994). Islam and the Concept of Tolerance and Coexistence. Journal of Dharma 19 (4):350-357.
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  4. António Tomas Ana & Patrício Batsîkama (2008). Etonism, Philosophy of Tolerant Reason. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 28:29-44.
    The term etonism reflects the Angolan ancestral philosophy… Etona in Kikôngo, etonolo or etonuilo in Umbûndu: allegations, reasons, indulgence (tolerance). In Nyaneka form is etŏnya. These significances constitute the essence of the etonism: 1) reasons, 2) allegations, 3) indulgence, 4) evidence that generates the justice and the tolerance. «Who is correct tolerates who is wrong». Also, Etonism identifies 1) racism, 2) tribalism and 3) discrimination as a serious sequel of neo-colonialism, and calls the attention of the Angolan people, using roots (...)
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  5. Sybol Cook Anderson (2009). Hegel's Theory of Recognition: From Oppression to Ethical Liberal Modernity. Continuum.
    Introduction: Redeeming recognition -- Oppression reconsidered -- Foundations of a liberal conception -- Toward a liberal conception of oppression -- Conclusion : A liberal conception of oppression -- Misrecognition as oppression -- Exploitation and disempowerment -- Cultural imperialism -- Marginalization -- Violence -- Conclusion: Misrecognition as oppression -- Overcoming oppression : the limits of toleration -- Contemporary differences : matters of toleration -- John Rawls : political liberalism -- Will Kymlicka : multicultural citizenship -- Conclusion: Accommodating differences : the limits (...)
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  6. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2013). Leibniz’s Doctrine of Toleration: Philosophical, Theological and Pragmatic Reasons. In J. Parkin & T. Stanton (eds.), Natural Law and Toleration in the Early Enlightenment. Oxford University Press. 139-164.
    Leibniz is not commonly numbered amongst canonical writers on toleration. One obvious reason is that, unlike Locke, he wrote no treatise specifically devoted to that doctrine. Another is the enormous amount of energy which he famously devoted to ecclesiastical reunification. Promoting the reunification of Christian churches is an objective quite different from promoting the toleration of different religious faiths – so different, in fact, that they are sometimes even construed as mutually exclusive. Ecclesiastical reunification aims to find agreement at least (...)
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  7. Maria Rosa Antognazza (2002). Leibniz and Religious Toleration. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 76 (4):601-622.
    As one might expect, throughout his life Leibniz assumed an attitude of religious toleration both ad intra (that is, toward Christians of other confessions) and ad extra (that is, toward non-Christians, notably Muslims). Focusing in particular on his epistolary exchange with the French Catholic convert Paul Pellisson-Fontanier, I argue that neither toleration ad intra nor toleration ad extra is grounded for Leibniz in indifference toward the content of revealed religion. On the contrary, Leibniz remained convinced of the objective truth of (...)
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  8. D. Archard (forthcoming). Michael Walzer, On Toleration. Radical Philosophy.
  9. Richard Ashcraft (ed.) (1991). John Locke: Critical Assessments. Routledge.
    This work is the second in the Routledge Series of Critical Assessments of Leading Political Philosophers . Each volume of the series presents a comprehensive selection of the critical literature commenting on the life and works of a major political philosopher. John Locke (1632-1704) is a key figure because his political philosophy was one of the foundations for both the American Constitution and the French Revolution. He defined government as based on a free contract between people which can be subsequently (...)
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  10. Giorgio Baruchello (2002). Worlds of Difference. Dialogue 41 (4):802-804.
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  11. Teresa M. Bejan (2011). The Bond of Civility': Roger Williams on Toleration and its Limits. History of European Ideas 37 (4):409-420.
    In this article, I examine the meaning of the concept of ?civility? for Roger Williams and the role it played in his arguments for religious toleration. I place his concern with civility in the broader context of his life and works and show how it differed from the missionary and civilizing efforts of his fellow New English among the American Indians. For Williams, civility represented a standard of inclusion in the civil community that was ?essentially distinct? from Christianity, which properly (...)
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  12. P. Bendlova (1995). Reflections on Marcel Phenomenology and Dialectics of Tolerance and on His General Notion of Tolerance. Filosoficky Casopis 43 (5):759-764.
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  13. Peter G. Bietenholz (1972). Mino Celsi and the Toleration Controversy of the Sixteenth Century. Bibliothèque d'Humanisme Et Renaissance 34 (1):31-47.
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  14. Purushottama Bilimoria (1996). Ninian Smart Religion and Nationalism the Urgency of Transnational Spirituality and Toleration. Sophia 35 (1):131-137.
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  15. Alain Billecoq (1998). Spinoza et l'idée de tolérance. Philosophique 1:122-142.
    Alors que le plupart des commentateurs s'accorde pour affirmer que le Traité Théologico-Politique est un plaidoyer pour la tolérance, curieusement on ne trouvera pratiquement jamais le mot sous la plume de son auteur. Comme si Spinoza, qui le connaissait, l'écartait volontairement de son lexique philosophique. La présente étude s'efforce de mettre à jour les raisons de cette absence.
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  16. Sam Black (2007). Locke and the Skeptical Argument for Toleration. History of Philosophy Quarterly 24 (4):355-375.
  17. Sam Black (1998). Toleration and the Skeptical Inquirer in Locke. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 28 (4):473 - 504.
  18. Daniel J. Boorstin (1981). The Lost World of Thomas Jefferson: With a New Preface. University of Chicago Press.
    In this classic work by one of America's most distinguished historians, Daniel Boorstin enters into Thomas Jefferson's world of ideas. By analysing writings of 'the Jeffersonian Circle,' Boorstin explores concepts of God, nature, equality, toleration, education and government in order to illuminate their underlying world view. The Lost World of Thomas Jefferson demonstrates why on the 250th anniversary of his birth, this American leader's message has remained relevant to our national crises and grand concerns. "The volume is too subtle, too (...)
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  19. Vernon J. Bourke (1978). Lamirande on Augustine and Tolerance. Augustinian Studies 9:103-108.
  20. Timothy Brownlee (2013). Hegel's Defense of Toleration. In Angelica Nuzzo (ed.), Hegel on Religion and Politics. State University of New York Press. 79.
  21. Natalia Bukovskaya (2008). Tolerance in Kant's Philosoph-Political Discourse. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 50:63-69.
    Is it possible to explicate tolerant principles in the philosophy-political discourse of Kant? It seems the answer to this question is positive. And it is the philosophical project of Kant “Perpetual Peace”, which is the most representative in this respect, for it is based on the principles of tolerance. This project is included in ethic-legal (liberal) system and is connected with such notions as civil society, legal state, duty, moral law. Tolerance exists, on the one hand, as a result of (...)
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  22. Glenn Burgess, Paul J. Cornish, Kate Langdon Forhan, E. J. Furcha, Stephen Lahey, John Christian Laursen, Cary J. Nederman, Gary Remer, William Walker & Simone Zurbuchen (1996). Difference and Dissent: Theories of Toleration in Medieval and Early Modern Europe. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
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  23. Thomas W. Burkman (1974). The Urakami Incidents and the Struggle for Religious Toleration in Early Meiji Japan. Japanese Journal of Religious Studies 1:143-216.
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  24. H. C. (1964). A Letter Concerning Toleration. Review of Metaphysics 18 (1):179-179.
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  25. Tom D. Campbell (1990). Justifying Toleration: Conceptual and Historical Perspectives. Philosophical Books 31 (2):114-115.
  26. Anton Carpinschi (2010). Spiritul de toleranta, cultura recunoasterii si nevoia de comprehensiune/ The Spirit of Tolerance, the Culture of Recognition and the Need of Comprehension. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 4 (10):19-35.
    This study endeavours to demonstrate the dynamic “tolerance-recognition” in view of a comprehensive paradigm. Tolerance is presumed to be a „modus vivendi” – that is, the recognition of multiple ways of finding the good and happiness by human communities. In this context, the author proposes, as a heuristic device, a model of humanity based upon correlations between nature, condition, and essence as hypostases of humanity. In this way the study attempts to contribute to the planning of a necessary politics and (...)
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  27. Ioan Chirila (2010). On Tolerance - Sketch of a Christian Interpretation. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 1 (3):65-71.
    The aim of the article is to provide a Christian interpretation to the concept of tolerance. The idea of tolerance is strongly related to the religion revealed by Jesus Christ. Moreover, Christianity is a religion that opens through love, thus tolerant.Religious tolerance in our era should be examined, as it is pointed out in the article, strarting from a reconsideration of the term of "Christian Church". The consensus over these matters would generate a genuine ecclesiastic co- citizenship and place the (...)
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  28. Samuel Clark (2009). No Abiding City: Hume, Naturalism, and Toleration. Philosophy 84 (1):75-94.
    This paper rereads David Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion as dramatising a distinctive, naturalistic account of toleration. I have two purposes in mind: first, to complete and ground Hume's fragmentary explicit discussion of toleration; second, to unearth a potentially attractive alternative to more recent, Rawlsian approaches to toleration. To make my case, I connect Dialogues and the problem of toleration to the wider themes of naturalism, scepticism and their relation in Hume's thought, before developing a new interpretation of Dialogues part (...)
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  29. John Coffey (2008). Milton, Locke and the New History of Toleration. Modern Intellectual History 5 (3):619.
  30. James Collins (1969). Epistola De Tolerantia: A Letter on Toleration. By John Locke. Ed. Raymond Klibansky and Trans. J.W. Gough / The Sage of Salisbury: Thomas Chubb (1679-1747). By T. L. Bushell. [REVIEW] Modern Schoolman 46 (4):356-357.
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  31. Anne Finch Conway (1996). The Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Anne Conway was an extraordinary figure in a remarkable age. Her mastery of the intricate doctrines of the Lurianic Kabbalah, her authorship of a treatise criticising the philosophy of Descartes, Hobbes, and Spinoza, and her scandalous conversion to the despised sect of Quakers indicate a strength of character and independence of mind wholly unexpected (and unwanted) in a woman at the time. Translated for the first time into modern English, her Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy is the (...)
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  32. Raymond Corrigan (1934). The Development of Religious Toleration in England. Thought 9 (1):150-151.
  33. Herbert H. Coulson (1941). The Development of Religious Toleration in England. Thought 16 (2):364-365.
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  34. Herbert H. Coulson (1939). The Development of Religious Toleration in England 1640-1660. Thought 14 (4):659-661.
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  35. M. Cranston (1988). Locke on Toleration. Rivista Internazionale di Filosofia Del Diritto 65 (2):213-219.
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  36. Maurice Cranston (1987). John Locke and the Case for Toleration. In Susan Mendus & David Edwards (eds.), On Toleration. Oxford University Press. 101--121.
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  37. Ingrid Creppell (2001). Montaigne: The Embodiment of Identity as Grounds for Toleration. Res Publica 7 (3):247-271.
    One of the most important issues today is the conflict between identity groups. Can the concept of toleration provide resources for thinking about this? The standard definition of toleration – rejection or disapproval of a practice or belief followed by a constraint of oneself from repressing it –has limits. If we seek to make political and social conditions of toleration among diverse people a stable reality, we need to flesh out more deeply and widely what that depends upon. The essence (...)
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  38. Ingrid Creppell (1996). Locke on Toleration: The Transformation of Constraint. Political Theory 24 (2):200-240.
  39. E. M. Curley (2005). Scepticism and Toleration: The Case of Montaigne. In Daniel Garber & Steven Nadler (eds.), Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy Volume 2. Oup Oxford.
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  40. Edwin Curley (2000). Castellio Vs. Spinoza on Religious Toleration. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 7:89-110.
    The central thesis of Spinoza’s Theological-Political Treatise is that the state not only can permit freedom of philosophizing without endangering piety or the public peace, but that it must do so if it is not to destroy piety and the public peace. Spinoza’s argument is not limited to religious toleration, but is an argument for freedom of philosophizing generally. Nevertheless, freedom of philosophizing in religion is the central case. In making such an argument, he contributed greatly toward the transformation of (...)
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  41. Michael Davis (1979). The Budget of Tolerance. Ethics 89 (2):165-178.
  42. Gary De Krey (2010). John Locke, Toleration and Early Enlightenment Culture. Faith and Philosophy 27 (2):231-236.
  43. Jakob De Roover & S. N. Balagangadhara (2008). John Locke, Christian Liberty, and the Predicament of Liberal Toleration. Political Theory 36 (4):523-549.
    Recently, scholars have disputed whether Locke's political theory should be read as the groundwork of secular liberalism or as a Protestant political theology. Focusing on Locke's mature theory of toleration, the article raises a central question: What if these two readings are compatible? That is, what would be the consequences if Locke's political philosophy has theological foundations, but has also given shape to secular liberalism? Examining Locke's theory in the Letter Concerning Toleration (1689), the article argues that this is indeed (...)
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  44. Jakob De Roover & S. N. Balagangadhara (2008). John Locke, Christian Liberty, and the Predicament of Liberal Toleration. Political Theory 36 (4):523-549.
  45. Richard H. Dees (2008). Of Socinians and Homosexuals: Trust and the Limits of Toleration. In Russel Hardin, Ingrid Crepell & Stephen Macedo (eds.), Toleration on Trial. Lexington Books. 85.
  46. Richard H. Dees (2005). “The Paradoxical Principle and Salutary Practice”: Hume on Toleration. Hume Studies 31 (1):145-164.
  47. Richard H. Dees (2004). Trust and Toleration. Routledge.
    This book outlines the social, conceptual, and psychological preconditions for toleration.By looking closely at the religious wars of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in France and England and at contemporary controversies about the rights of homosexuals, Richard Dees demonstrates how trust between the opposing parties is needed first, but in just these cases, distrust is all-too-rational. Ultimately, that distrust can only be overcome if the parties undergo a fundamental shift of values - a conversion. Only then can they accept some (...)
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  48. Richard H. Dees (1998). Trust and the Rationality of Toleration. Noûs 32 (1):82-98.
  49. Mario Delmirani (1953). Tolerance Et Communaute Humaine. Thought 28 (4):608-611.
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  50. Drago Djuric (2013). Religious Tolerance in the Edict of Milan and in the Constitution of Medina. Filozofija I Društvo 24 (1):277-292.
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