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  1. Per Anderson (2003). Christian Batalden Scharen, Married in the Sight of God: Theology, Ethics and Church Debates Over Homosexuality. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 37 (2):275-279.
  2. Dominique Bauer (2006). Homosexuality Within the Context of Social Institutionalisation and Moral Sense. Ethical Perspectives 13 (1):61-89.
  3. Michael Benoit (2005). Conflict Between Religious Commitment and Same-Sex Attraction: Possibilities for a Virtuous Response. Ethics and Behavior 15 (4):309 – 325.
    This article addresses the treatment of individuals who experience conflict between their religious convictions and their same-sex attraction. Recently, attention has been drawn to the ethical issues involved in the practice of sexual reorientation therapy (SRT) with such conflicted individuals. This article reviews the ethical arguments for and against SRT through the lens of the general ethical principles of the American Psychological Association's (2002) ethics code. Practitioners are then challenged to think about how they might respond virtuously (Meara, Schmidt, & (...)
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  4. Ralph Blair (1982). Ethics & Gay Christians. R. Blair.
  5. J. Michael Clark (1990). A Defiant Celebration: Theological Ethics & Gay Sexuality. Tangelwüld Press.
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  6. S. Crown (1980). Psychosocial Aspects of Homosexuality. Journal of Medical Ethics 6 (3):130-132.
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  7. Dena S. Davis (2008). Religion, Genetics, and Sexual Orientation: The Jewish Tradition. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 18 (2):pp. 125-148.
    This paper probes the implications of a genetic basis for sexual orientation for traditional branches of Judaism, which are struggling with how accepting to be of noncelibate gays and lesbians in their communities. The paper looks at the current attitudes toward homosexuality across the different branches of Judaism; social and cultural factors that work against acceptance; attitudes toward science in Jewish culture; and the likelihood that scientific evidence that sexual orientation is at least partly genetically determined will influence Jewish scholars' (...)
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  8. Wayne R. Dynes & Stephen Donaldson (eds.) (1992). Homosexuality and Religion and Philosophy. Garland.
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  9. R. W. Hierholzer (2004). Are We Ready for Sexual Reorientation Therapy in the U.S. Military? A Response to David W. Lutz. Christian Bioethics 10 (2-3):227-238.
    In his paper “The Catholic Church, the American Military, and Homosexual Reorientation Therapy,” David W. Lutz ultimately concludes that it is “appropriate, and highly ethical” for the American military to offer reorientation therapy to help homosexuals overcome “the vice of sodomy.” The major thrust of his paper, however, is to call for abandonment of the “Don't Ask/Don't Tell” policy currently in place in the military. Lutz's paper covers much ground, and this review begins by examining whether such a wide view (...)
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  10. Daniel Howard-Snyder, The Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans: Should Conservative Anglicans Sign Up?
    The Fellowship of Confessing Anglicans (FCA), whose leaders govern well over half of the 80 million Anglicans worldwide, have put forward ‘a contemporary rule,’ called The Jerusalem Declaration, to guide the Anglican realignment movement. The FCA and its affiliates, e.g. the newly-formed Anglican Church in North America, require assent to the Declaration. To date, there has been little serious appraisal of the Declaration and the status accorded to it. I aim to correct that omission. Unlike ap-praisals in the social media, (...)
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  11. A. A. Howsepian (2004). Treating Homosexuality: A Response to Yarhouse. Christian Bioethics 10 (2-3):259-267.
    Professor Mark A. Yarhouse proposes an ‘identity synthesis’ model of sexual modification therapy for homosexuals. This model is meant primarily to target the process by which one's sexual identity is synthesized, rather than the changing of sexual orientation itself. I highlight some of the advantages of Yarhouse's model along with some of its potential pitfalls. My primary point of departure with Yarhouse concerns how one ought to direct those selfidentified homosexual clients who fall within our clinical sphere of influence and (...)
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  12. D. W. Lutz (2004). The Catholic Church, the American Military, and Homosexual Reorientation Therapy. Christian Bioethics 10 (2-3):189-226.
    Homosexual activist groups have targeted the Catholic Church and the American military as institutions especially in need of transformation. Associations of healthcare professionals are also under assault from homosexual activists. It is, nevertheless, appropriate for the Church and the military to defend themselves against this assault, to affirm that homosexuality is incompatible with Christian ethics and military service, and to help homosexuals free themselves from the vice of homosexuality. Arguments that homosexual reorientation therapy is unethical are unsound. Such therapy is (...)
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  13. Thomas G. Plante (2007). Ethical Considerations for Psychologists Screening Applicants for the Priesthood in the Catholic Church: Implications of the Vatican Instruction on Homosexuality. Ethics and Behavior 17 (2):131 – 136.
    The release of the Vatican instruction on homosexuality in the priesthood and Catholic seminaries poses several challenging ethical issues for the psychologists who conduct psychological screening evaluations for those men interested in religious life as Catholic priests. This brief article reviews some of the key ethical issues associated with these evaluations in light of the new Vatican instruction on homosexuality. The RRICC model based on the American Psychological Association's Code of Ethics (i.e., responsibility, respect, integrity, competence, and concern) is used (...)
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  14. Eric H. Reitan (1999). Homosexuality, Misogyny, and God's Plan. Faith and Philosophy 16 (2):213-232.
    In response to powerful criticisms of older arguments, contemporary defenders of the Church’s traditional stance on homosexuality have fashioned a new kind of argument based upon the special relationship God created between the sexes. In this paper we examine two recent incarnations of this kind of argument and show that both fail to demonstrate the inherent immorality of homosexual relationships, and at most demonstrate that homosexual relationships are inferior to heterosexual relationships in certain respects. At the end of the paper (...)
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  15. Cristina Richie (2010). An Argument Against the Use of the Word 'Homosexual' in English Translations of the Bible. Heythrop Journal 51 (5):723-729.
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  16. Trevor Smith (2006). Homosexuality and the Bible. Teaching Philosophy 29 (4):299-306.
    The argument presented here explores homosexuality within the context of applied Christian ethics. The argument works by asking students to grapple with and define the common characteristics of all eros relationships. Once the students analytically break down eros relationships, and wrestle with defining concepts such as “love,” “sex,” and “desires,” basic biblical moral precepts are applied. After this biblical application it can be shown that there is latitude enough in Christian morality to openly permit homosexuality that iscompatible with biblically stated (...)
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