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  1. Lucy F. Ackert, Bryan K. Church, Xi Kuang & Li Qi (2011). Lying. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):605-632.
    Individuals often lie for psychological rewards (e.g., preserving self image and/or protecting others), absent economic rewards. We conducted a laboratory experiment, using a modified dictator game, to identify conditions that entice individuals to lie solely for psychological rewards. We argue that such lies can provide a ready means for individuals to manage others’ impression of them. We investigated the effect of social distance (the perceived familiarity, intimacy, or psychological proximity between two parties) and knowledge of circumstances (whether parties have common (...)
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  2. Yves Bertrand (1998). The Ordinary Hero. Atwood Publishing.
    The Ordinary Hero is an in-depth search of where we should turn to find meaning in our lives.
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  3. David Decosimo (2010). Just Lies: Finding Augustine's Ethics of Public Lying in His Treatments of Lying and Killing. Journal of Religious Ethics 38 (4):661-697.
    Augustine famously defends the justice of killing in certain public contexts such as just wars. He also claims that private citizens who intentionally kill are guilty of murder, regardless of their reasons. Just as famously, Augustine seems to prohibit lying categorically. Analyzing these features of his thought and their connections, I argue that Augustine is best understood as endorsing the justice of lying in certain public contexts, even though he does not explicitly do so. Specifically, I show that parallels between (...)
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  4. George Graham & Hugh LaFollette (1986). Honesty and Intimacy. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships.
    Current professional and lay lore overlook the role of honesty in developing and sustaining intimate relationships. We wish to assert its importance. We begin by analyzing the notion of intimacy. An intimate encounter or exchange, we argue, is one in which one verbally or non-verbally privately reveals something about oneself, and does so in a sensitive, trusting way. An intimate relationship is one marked by regular intimate encounters or exchanges. Then, we consider two sorts of cases where it is widely (...)
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  5. Jamee Gresley, Heidi Wallace, Julie M. Hupp & Sara Staats (2009). Heroes Don't Cheat: An Examination of Academic Dishonesty and Students' Views on Why Professors Don't Report Cheating. Ethics and Behavior 19 (3):171-183.
    Some students do not cheat. Students high in measures of bravery, honesty, and empathy, our defining characteristics of heroism, report less past cheating than other students. These student heroes also reported that they would feel more guilt if they cheated and also reported less intent to cheat in the future than nonheroes. We find general consensus between students and professors as to reasons for the nonreporting of cheating, suggesting a general impression of insufficient evidence, lack of courage, and denial. Suggested (...)
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  6. Kate Hodkinson (2008). How Should a Nurse Approach Truth-Telling? A Virtue Ethics Perspective. Nursing Philosophy 9 (4):248-256.
    Abstract Truth-telling is a key issue within the nurse–patient relationship. Nurses make decisions on a daily basis regarding what information to tell patients. This paper analyses truth-telling within an end of life scenario. Virtue ethics provides a useful philosophical approach for exploring decisions on information disclosure in more detail. Virtue ethics allows appropriate examination of the moral character of the nurse involved, their intention, ability to use wisdom and judgement when making decisions and the virtue of truth-telling. It is appropriate (...)
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  7. Thomas S. Huddle (2012). Honesty Is an Internal Norm of Medical Practice and the Best Policy. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (3):15-17.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 3, Page 15-17, March 2012.
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  8. Jeff Malpas (2008). Truth, Lies, and Deceit. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (1):1-12.
    On the one hand, most of us would take honesty to be a key ethical virtue. Corporations and other organizations often include it in their codes of ethics, we legislate against various forms of dishonesty, we tend to be ashamed (or at least defensive) when we are caught not telling the truth, and honesty is often regarded as a key element in relationships. Yet on the other hand, dishonesty, that is, lying and deceit, seems to be commonplace in contemporary public (...)
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  9. Don Peppers (2012). Extreme Trust: Honesty as a Competitive Advantage. Portfolio/Penguin.
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  10. Laura Rogers & Nancy Faust Sizer (2010). Ethical Dilemmas in Education: Standing Up for Honesty and Integrity. Journal of Moral Education 39 (2):243-248.
    (2010). Ethical dilemmas in education: standing up for honesty and integrity. Journal of Moral Education: Vol. 39, No. 2, pp. 243-248. doi: 10.1080/03057241003755093.
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  11. Albert Spalding (2007). Loyalty in the Workplace. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 14 (1):50-59.
    Corporate codes of conduct frequently impose a duty of loyalty upon employees. l examine the notion of loyalty in general, and loyalty in the workplace in particular. I conclude that unless loyalty is defined and articulated in favor of a larger social project (rather than in favor of aperson, a set of ruIes, or other entity), efforts to encourage loyalty will be a source of epistemic distortion at best, and oppression at worst.
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