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Summary What is hope, from a philosophical point of view?  Can hope be characterized in terms of belief (or degrees of belief) plus some sort of desire or affect? If this kind of “belief-plus” analysis insufficient to characterize hope, what other conditions are required? Are there different kinds of hope – some that are susceptible to belief-plus analysis, and others that aren’t? For instance, could we regard the “idle hope” that I win the lottery as constituted by the belief that it’s possible plus the desire that it happen, but then develop more robust conceptions of the kinds of hope that actively engage deliberation and moral psychology (e.g. the hope that I recover from this terminal diagnosis, despite the long odds)? How does a particular view of hope (or one of its kinds) relate to traditional accounts of hope as a human virtue? Is hope a virtue? If some kind of hope is a virtue, is it a moral virtue, or an intellectual one, or some sort of hybrid?
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  1. E. Abegg (1965). Religion as Hope for the Supernatural. Sophia 4 (1):27-33.
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  2. John C. Adams (2010). Hope, Truth, and Rhetoric : Prophecy and Pragmatism in Service of Feminism's Cause. In Marianne Janack (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Richard Rorty. Pennsylvania State University Press.
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  3. Robert Merrihew Adams (1995). Moral Faith. Journal of Philosophy 92 (2):75-95.
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  4. Robert Merrihew Adams (1987). The Virtue of Faith and Other Essays in Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press.
    Robert Merrihew Adams has been a leader in renewing philosophical respect for the idea that moral obligation may be founded on the commands of God. This collection of Adams' essays, two of which are previously unpublished, draws from his extensive writings on philosophical theology that discuss metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical issues surrounding the concept of God--whether God exists or not, what God is or would be like, and how we ought to relate ourselves to such a being. Adams studies the (...)
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  5. Robert Merrihew Adams (1979). Moral Arguments for Theistic Belief. In C. F. Delaney (ed.), Rationality and Religious Belief. University of Notre Dame Press.
    Moral arguments were the type of theistic argument most characteristic of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. More recently they have become one of philosophy’s abandoned farms. The fields are still fertile, but they have not been cultivated systematically since the latest methods came in. The rambling Victorian farmhouse has not been kept up as well as similar structures, and people have not been stripping the sentimental gingerbread off the porches to reveal the clean lines of argument. This paper is (...)
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  6. William P. Alston (ed.) (1989). Divine Nature and Human Language: Essays in Philosophical Theology. Cornell University Press.
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  7. Ronald C. Arnett (2012). Communication Ethics in Dark Times: Hannah Arendt's Rhetoric of Warning and Hope. Southern Illinois University Press.
  8. Ronald Aronson (2007). Hope and Action. The Philosophers' Magazine 38 (38):40-42.
    One of the paradoxes of the Culture War is that opposites conspire with each other against the rest of us. We are offered an impoverished, narrow conception of reason and knowledge, proposing a stark choice to the rest of us: approach life’s important questions through science, or turn to religion. This was a false choice two hundred years ago, and it remains so today.
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  9. Ronald Aronson (2007). Hope and Action. The Philosophers' Magazine 38 (38):40-42.
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  10. Nafsika Athanassoulis & Samantha Vice (eds.) (2008). The Moral Life: Essays in Honour of John Cottingham. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Few contemporary philosophers have made as wide-ranging and insightful a contribution to philosophical debate as John Cottingham. This collection brings together friends, colleagues and former students of Cottingham, to discuss major themes of his work on moral philosophy. Presented in three parts the collection focuses on the debate on partiality, impartiality and character; the role of emotions and reason in the good life; the meaning of a worthwhile life and the place of theistic considerations in it. The original contributions to (...)
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  11. Robin Attfield (1995). Population Growth and Hope for Humanity. Social Philosophy Today 11:21-33.
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  12. Robert Audi (2011). Rationality and Religious Commitment. OUP Oxford.
    Rationality and Religious Commitment shows how religious commitment can be rational and describes the place of faith in the postmodern world. It portrays religious commitment as far more than accepting doctrines--it is viewed as a kind of life, not just as an embrace of tenets. Faith is conceived as a unique attitude. It is irreducible to belief but closely connected with both belief and conduct, and intimately related to life's moral, political, and aesthetic dimensions. -/- Part One presents an account (...)
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  13. Robert Audi & William J. Wainwright (eds.) (1986). Rationality, Religious Belief, and Moral Commitment: New Essays in the Philosophy of Religion. Cornell University Press.
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  14. Augustine, Handbook on Faith Hope and Love (Outler Translation).
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  15. Sidney Axinn (2000). Kant on Possible Hope. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 7:79-87.
    According to Kant, there are limits to possible hope. For example, hope for a contradiction is obviously not a logically possible hope. However, Kant goes much further and restricts possible hope to what can be possibly experienced. The line between what can and cannot be constructed as an image in space and time limits what can be thought rather than what can be merely mentioned. The apparently modern distinction between use and mention (generally attributed to Frege) is used by Kant (...)
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  16. Michael Bacon (2011). Richard Rorty : Liberalism, Irony, and Social Hope. In Catherine H. Zuckert (ed.), Political Philosophy in the Twentieth Century: Authors and Arguments. Cambridge University Press.
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  17. Peter R. Baelz (1974). The Forgotten Dream: Experience, Hope and God. Mowbrays.
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  18. Marie Baird (1997). Death Camp Survival and the Possibility of Hope. Philosophy and Theology 10 (2):385-419.
    This paper will argue that many survivors’ ability to take up their existence hopefully is rooted in the deeply visceral and unintegrable memory of “living the existence of a walking corpse” (Niederland 1968b, 12) that constitutes the ontic basis for their most fundamental presence to self, others, and God. I will show, secondly, that Karl Rahner’s theological formulation of witness as “an act of self transcendence in which the subject reaches up to the unsurpassable and sovereign Mystery which we call (...)
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  19. Manuel Ballester Hernandez (ed.) (2005). Ante Un Mundo Roto: Lecturas Sobre la Esperanza. Universidad Católica San Antonio.
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  20. Paul Bartha (2008). Review: Pascal's Wager: Pragmatic Arguments and Belief in God – Jeff Jordan. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 58 (232):571–574.
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  21. Lewis White Beck (1960). A Commentary of Kant's Critique of Practical Reason. [Chicago]University of Chicago Press.
    When this work was first published in 1960, it immediately filled a void in Kantian scholarship.
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  22. Catharine D. Bell (2009). John Dewey and the Philosophy and Practice of Hope. Education and Culture 25 (1):pp. 66-70.
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  23. Andrew E. Benjamin (1997). Present Hope: Philosophy, Architecture, Judaism. Routledge.
    Present Hope is a compelling exploration of how we think philosophically about the present. Andrew Benjamin considers examples in philosophy, architecture and poetry to illustrate crucial themes of loss, memory, tragedy, hope and modernity. The book uses the work of Walter Benjamin and Martin Heidegger to illustrate the ways the notion of hope was weaved into their philosophies. Andrew Benjamin maintains that hope is a vital part of the present, rather than an expression only of the future. Present Hope shows (...)
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  24. Ernst Benz (1966). Evolution and Christian Hope. Garden City, N.Y.,Doubleday.
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  25. Bettina Bergo (2008). A Site From Which to Hope? Levinas Studies 3:117-142.
    We have now had some two decades of Levinas commentary. What remains to be said? Certainly one thing we have learned since Otherwise than Being is that Levinas’s philosophy and his talmudic and confessional writings nourish each other so profoundly that to approach Levinas without understanding the historyof Jewish philosophy — in its confrontations with neo-Platonism, Aristotle, Kant — is to risk misunderstanding Levinas. Insights into the interrelationships between Jewish thought and Levinas’s other humanism have been provided by thinkers like (...)
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  26. Isaiah Berlin (1963). The Presidential Address: "From Hope and Fear Set Free". Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 64:1 - 30.
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  27. Donald L. Berry (2004). Hope for Our Time. International Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):293-294.
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  28. Martin A. Bertman (1970). Gabriel Marcel On Hope. Philosophy Today 14 (2):101-105.
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  29. Jennifer Beste (2005). Instilling Hope and Respecting Patient Autonomy: Reconciling Apparently Conflicting Duties. Bioethics 19 (3):215–231.
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  30. L. Stafford Betty (2001). Going Beyond James: A Pragmatic Argument for God's Existence. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 49 (2):69-84.
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  31. Otto Bird (1941). The Christian Basis for Marxist Hope. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 17:120-129.
  32. John Bishop (2006). The Philosophy of Religion: A Programmatic Overview. Philosophy Compass 1 (5):506–534.
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  33. Ernst Bloch (1986). The Principle of Hope. Mit Press.
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  34. Stephen Bloch-Schulman (2010). When the "Best Hope" is Not so Hopeful, What Then?: Democratic Thinking, Democratic Pedagogies, and Higher Education. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (4):399-415.
    In 2008, Peter Felten, the founding director of Elon's Center for the Advancement of Teaching and Learning, asked me to coordinate an inaugural two-year teaching and learning seminar for faculty, to focus on some element of engaged learning (Elon University's pedagogical focus). We titled the project the Elon Research Seminar on Engaged Undergraduate Learning. As a philosopher who works at the intersections of political philosophy and the scholarship of teaching and learning and as one interested in the relationships among democracy, (...)
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  35. Jeffrey Bloechl, David L. Smith & Daniel J. Martino (eds.) (2004). The Phenomenology of Hope: The Twenty-First Annual Symposium of the Simon Silverman Phenomenology Center: Lectures. Simon Silverman Phenomenology Center, Duquesne University-Gumberg Library.
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  36. T. V. Borysova (2005). Metafizychni Rozdumy Pro Nadii͡u. Dnipropetrovska Derz͡h. Finansova Akademii͡a.
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  37. Patrick L. Bourgeois (2006). Marcel and Ricoeur: Mystery and Hope at the Boundary of Reason in the Postmodern Situation. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 80 (3):421-433.
    This article on mystery and hope at the boundary of reason in the postmodern situation responds to the challenge of postmodern thinking to philosophyby a recourse to the works of Gabriel Marcel and his best disciple, Paul Ricoeur. It develops along the lines of their interpretation of hope as a central phenomenon in human experience and existence, thus shedding light on the philosophical enterprise for the future. It is our purpose to dwell briefly on this postmodern challenge and then, incorporating (...)
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  38. Luc Bovens (1999). The Value of Hope. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (3):667-681.
    Hope obeys Aristotle's doctrine of the mean: one should neither hope too much, nor too little. But what determines what constitutes too much and what constitutes too little for a particular person at a particular time? The sceptic presents an argument to the effect that it is never rational to hope. An attempt to answer the sceptic leads us in different directions. Decision-theoretic and preference-theoretic arguments support the instrumental value of hope. An investigation into the nature of hope permits us (...)
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  39. Keith Breen (2002). Alasdair MacIntyre and the Hope for a Politics of Virtuous Acknowledged Dependence. Contemporary Political Theory 1 (2):181.
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  40. David Owen Brink (1989). Moral Realism and the Foundations of Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a systematic and constructive treatment of a number of traditional issues at the foundations of ethics. These issues concern the objectivity of ethics, the possibility and nature of moral knowledge, the relationship between the moral point of view and a scientific or naturalist world-view, the nature of moral value and obligation, and the role of morality in a person's rational lifeplan. In striking contrast to traditional and more recent work in the field, David Brink offers an integrated (...)
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  41. Robert Briscoe (2001). Faith, Social Hope, and Clarity. [REVIEW] Boston Book Review.
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  42. Craig Browne (2005). Hope, Critique, and Utopia. Critical Horizons 6 (1):63-86.
    This paper assesses the extent to which the category of hope assists in preserving and redefining the vestiges of utopian thought in critical social theory. Hope has never had a systematic position among the categories of critical social theory, although it has sometimes acquired considerable prominence. It will be argued that the current philosophical and everyday interest in social hope can be traced to the limited capacity of liberal conceptions of freedom to articulate a vision of social transformation apposite to (...)
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  43. Ian Buchanan (1998). Metacommentary on Utopia, or Jameson's Dialectic of Hope. Utopian Studies 9 (2):18 - 30.
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  44. Keith Burgess-Jackson (1996). Mackie on Kant's Moral Argument. Sophia 35 (1):5-20.
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  45. Peter Burns (1995). Stubborn Hope. Radical Philosophy Review of Books 1995 (11-12):69-75.
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  46. Brian E. Butler (2012). Reading Obama: Dreams, Hope, and the American Political Tradition. [REVIEW] Education and Culture 28 (1):87-90.
  47. Peter Byrne (2006). God and the Moral Order. Faith and Philosophy 23 (2):201-208.
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  48. Roger Caldwell (2011). The Uses of Pessimism and the Dangers of False Hope. Philosophy Now 82:40-41.
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  49. Carnegie Samuel Calian (1969). Berdyaev's Philosophy of Hope. Leiden, E. J. Brill.
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  50. Steven A. Carr (1990). Celebrate Life: Hope for a Culture Preoccupied with Death. Wolgemuth & Hyatt.
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