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  1. David Aagesen (2004). Burning Monkey-Puzzle: Native Fire Ecology and Forest Management in Northern Patagonia. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 21 (2-3):233-242.
    This article outlines the ecological and ethnobotanical characteristics of the monkey-puzzle tree (Araucariaaraucana), a long-lived conifer of great importance to the indigenous population living in and around its range in the southern Andes. The article also considers the pre-Columbian and historical use of indigenous fire technology. Conclusive evidence of indigenous burning is unavailable. However, our knowledge of native fire ecology elsewhere and our understanding of monkey-puzzle's ecological response to fire suggest that indigenous people probably burned in the past to facilitate (...)
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  2. David Abram & Melissa Geib (eds.) (2006). Phenomenology and Ecology: The Twenty-Third Annual Symposium of the Simon Silverman Phenomenology Center: Lectures. Simon Silverman Phenomenology Center, Duquesne University.
    Between the body and the breathing earth : on the phenomenology of depth perception -- To praise again : phenomenology and the project of ecopsychology -- Postphenomenology and the lifeworld : interconnections, relationships, and environmental wholes : a phenomenological ecology of natural and built worlds.
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  3. Ralph Acampora (2004). Oikos and Domus : On Constructive Co-Habitation with Other Creatures. Philosophy and Geography 7 (2):219 – 235.
    Semi-urban ecotones exist on the periphery and in the midst of many human population centers. This article addresses the need for and nature of an ethos appropriate to inter-species contact in such zones. It first examines the historical and contemporary intellectual resources available for developing this kind of ethic, then surveys the range of possible relationships between humans and other animals, and finally investigates the morality of multi-species neighborhoods as a promising model. Discussion of these themes has the effect, in (...)
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  4. Ralph Acampora (2003). The Joyful Wisdom of Ecology on Perspectival and Relational Contact with Nature and Animality. New Nietzsche Studies 5 (3/4/1/2):22-34.
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  5. Gerard Ahearne (2013). Towards an Ecological Civilization: A Gramscian Strategy for a New Political Subject. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):317-326.
    Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE While much work has been done theorising the concept of an ecological civilization, the actual transition to an ecological civilization is another matter. One possible strategy for transforming our world from a death-rattle industrial civilization to a life affirming ecological civilization may be found in the later work of Antonio Gramsci. It is argued that as Gramsci became increasingly disillusioned with Soviet communism, he diagnosed its failure as due to the way opposition (...)
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  6. Christopher B. Anderson, Gene E. Likens, Ricardo Rozzi, Julio R. Gutiérrez & Juan J. Armesto (2008). Integrating Science and Society Through Long-Term Socio-Ecological Research. Environmental Ethics 30 (3):295-312.
    Long-term ecological research (LTER), addressing problems that encompass decadal or longer time frames, began as a formal term and program in the United States in 1980. While long-term ecological studies and observation began as early as the 1400s and 1800s in Asia and Europe, respectively, the long-term approach was not formalized until the establishment of the U.S. long-term ecological research programs. These programs permitted ecosystem-level experiments and cross-site comparisons that led to insights into the biosphere’s structure and function. The holistic (...)
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  7. Lynne Andersson, Sridevi Shivarajan & Gary Blau (2005). Enacting Ecological Sustainability in the MNC: A Test of an Adapted Value-Belief-Norm Framework. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 59 (3):295 - 305.
    . Undoubtedly, multinational corporations must play a significant role in the advancement of global ecological ethics. Our research offers a glimpse into the process of how goals of ecological sustainability in one multinational corporation can trickle down through the organization via the sustainability support behaviors of supervisors. We asked the question “How do supervisors in a multinational corporation internalize their corporation’s commitment to ecological sustainability and, in turn, behave in ways that convey this commitment to their subordinates?” In response, we (...)
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  8. A. Arunachalam & K. Arunachalam (eds.) (2010). Natural Resources Management in North-East India: Linking Ecology, Economics & Ethics. Dvs Publishers.
    section 1. Natural resources management -- section 2. Biodiversity and ecosystems -- section 3. Traditional farming and its management -- section 4. Conservation and sustainable development.
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  9. Fernando Dias Avila-Piredes, Luiz Carlos Mior, Vilênia Porto Aguiar & Susana Regina de Mello Schlemper (2000). The Concept of Sustainable Development Revisited. Foundations of Science 5 (3):261-268.
    The concept of sustainable development is here revised in the light of a brief historical analysis, followed by a semantic analysis of the expressions development and sustainability. The authors criticize the common use of this concept in a loose way or in wide generalizations, to conclude, based on the principles of human ecology, that it is only possible to make it operational in limited spans of time and in limited spatial units.
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  10. Sarla Banerjee (1985). Assortative Mating for Colour in Indian Populations. Journal of Biosocial Science 17 (2):205-209.
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  11. Scott W. Behie & Michael J. Bidochka (2013). Potential Agricultural Benefits Through Biotechnological Manipulation of Plant Fungal Associations. Bioessays 35 (4):328-331.
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  12. Ralf-Peter Behrendt (2006). The Desire to Obtain Money: A Culturally Ritualised Expression of the Aggressive Instinct. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):178-179.
    Social behaviour is but an expression of instinctive mechanisms whereby the aggressive instinct is of particular importance, having given rise to most of the complexity of social behaviour through processes of phylogenetic and cultural ritualisation. The role of the aggressive instinct is to dynamically maintain the ranking order in a group, and much of social interaction is concerned with this, including monetary exchange. What is certain, is that with the elimination of aggression, … the tackling of a task or problem, (...)
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  13. Donato Bergandi (1998). Geography of Human Societies. In P. Acot (ed.), The European Origins of Scientific Ecology. Gordon & Breach.
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  14. Jesse M. Bering & Todd K. Shackelford (2004). Supernatural Agents May Have Provided Adaptive Social Information. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):732-733.
    Atran & Norenzayan's (A&N's) target article effectively combines the insights of evolutionary biology and interdisciplinary cognitive science, neither of which alone yields sufficient explanatory power to help us fully understand the complexities of supernatural belief. Although the authors' ideas echo those of other researchers, they are perhaps the most squarely grounded in neo-Darwinian terms to date. Nevertheless, A&N overlook the possibility that the tendency to infer supernatural agents' communicative intent behind natural events served an ancestrally adaptive function.
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  15. Fikret Berkes, Carl Folke & Johan Colding (eds.) (1998). Linking Social and Ecological Systems: Management Practices and Social Mechanisms for Building Resilience. Cambridge University Press.
    It is usually the case that scientists examine either ecological systems or social systems, yet the need for an interdisciplinary approach to the problems of environmental management and sustainable development is becoming increasingly obvious. Developed under the auspices of the Beijer Institute in Stockholm, this new book analyses social and ecological linkages in selected ecosystems using an international and interdisciplinary case study approach. The chapters provide detailed information on a variety of management practices for dealing with environmental change. Taken as (...)
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  16. Daniel Berthold-Bond (1997). Hegel and Marx on Nature and Ecology. Journal of Philosophical Research 22:145-179.
    While neither Hegel nor Marx can be called “ecologists” in any strict sense of the term, they both present views of the human-nature relationship which offer important insights for contemporary debates in philosophical ecology. Further, while Marx and Engels began a tradition of sharply distinguishing their own views of nature from those of Hegel, careful examination reveals a substantial commonality of sentiment. The essay compares Hegel and Marx (and Engels) in terms of their basic conceptions of nature, their critiques of (...)
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  17. Gregor Betz (2007). Probabilities in Climate Policy Advice: A Critical Comment. Climatic Change 85 (1-2):1-9.
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  18. Aletta Biersack & James B. Greenberg (eds.) (2006). Reimagining Political Ecology. Duke University Press.
    Scholars from both disciplinary and interdisciplinary formations will discover the need to consult and use this volume.
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  19. Stephan Blatti (2012). A New Argument for Animalism. Analysis 72 (4):685-690.
    The view known as animalism asserts that we are human animals—that each of us is an instance of the Homo sapiens species. The standard argument for this view is known as the thinking animal argument . But this argument has recently come under attack. So, here, a new argument for animalism is introduced. The animal ancestors argument illustrates how the case for animalism can be seen to piggyback on the credibility of evolutionary theory. Two objections are then considered and answered.
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  20. Richard Blaustein (2013). New Insights Into Ancient Grain. Bioscience 63 (6).
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  21. April L. Bleske & David M. Buss (2000). A Comprehensive Theory of Human Mating Must Explain Between-Sex and Within-Sex Differences in Mating Strategies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):593-594.
    Gangestad & Simpson make a major contribution by highlighting the importance of mate choice for good genes, the costs of alternative strategies, and tradeoffs inherent in human mating. By downplaying sex differences and ignoring the nongenetic adaptive benefits of short term mating, however, they undermine their goal of “strategic pluralism” by presenting a theory devoid of many documented complexities of human mating.
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  22. K. F. Bloch (1979). Weshalb Werden Die urAlten so Alt? Acta Biotheoretica 28 (2).
    Some men can obtain hundred years or more, but the grounds are as yet unknown. Till now medical research has given no specific clues. Intensive consideration shows that life under quite natural (no longer found), not too hard social and climatic conditions (more maritime than arid) and in mountainous regions is decisive. It is clear that few territories of the earth come into consideration. The specific mental situation of mountain dwellers which contrasts in important points to that of the inhabitants (...)
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  23. Maurice Bloch & Dan Sperber, Kinship and Evolved Psychological Dispositions.
    This article revisits the old controversy concerning the relation of the mother’s brother and sister’s son in patrilineal societies in the light both of anthropological criticisms of the very notion of kinship and of evolutionary and epidemiological approaches to culture. It argues that the ritualized patterns of behavior discussed by Radcliffe-Brown, Goody, and others are to be explained in terms of the interaction of a variety of factors, some local and historical, others pertaining to general human dispositions. In particular, an (...)
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  24. Maurice Bloch & Dan Sperber, Kinship and Evolved Psychological Dispositions: The Mother's Brother Controversy Reconsidered (to Appear in Current Anthropology).
    The article revisits the old controversy concerning the relation of the mother's brother and sister's son in patrilineal societies in the light both of anthropological criticisms of the very notion of kinship and of evolutionary and epidemiological approaches to culture. It argues that the ritualized patterns of behavior that had been discussed by Radcliffe-Brown, Goody and others are to be explained in terms of the interaction of a variety of factors, some local and historical, others pertaining to general human dispositions. (...)
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  25. John Bolender (2007). Prehistoric Cognition by Description: A Russellian Approach to the Upper Paleolithic. Biology and Philosophy 22 (3):383-399.
    A cultural change occurred roughly 40,000 years ago. For the first time, there was evidence of belief in unseen agents and an afterlife. Before this time, humans did not show widespread evidence of being able to think about objects, persons, and other agents that they had not been in close contact with. I argue that one can explain this transition by appealing to a population increase resulting in greater exoteric (inter-group) communication. The increase in exoteric communication triggered the actualization of (...)
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  26. Nick Bostrom, The Future of Human Evolution.
    Evolutionary development is sometimes thought of as exhibiting an inexorable trend towards higher, more complex, and normatively worthwhile forms of life. This paper explores some dystopian scenarios where freewheeling evolutionary developments, while continuing to produce complex and intelligent forms of organization, lead to the gradual elimination of all forms of being that we care about. We then consider how such catastrophic outcomes could be avoided and argue that under certain conditions the only possible remedy would be a globally coordinated policy (...)
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  27. Luc Bovens (2010). Nudges and Cultural Variance: A Note on Selinger and Whyte. [REVIEW] Knowledge, Technology and Policy 23 (3-4):483-486.
    Selinger and Whyte argue that Thaler and Sunstein are insufficiently sensitive to cultural variance in Nudge. I construct a taxonomy of the various roles that cultural variance may play in nudges. First, biases that are exploited in nudging may interact with features that are culturally specific. Second, cultures may be more or less susceptible to certain biases. Third, cultures may resolve conflicting biases in different ways. And finally, nudge may be enlisted for different aims in different cultures.
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  28. Robert Boyd, Why Is Culture Adaptive?
    species is the extent t0 which behavior is acquired by teaching and imitation. The rapid radiation of the human species into a large variety of ecological niches over a wide geographical range during the last 100,000 years suggests that this mode of adaptation may be quite effective. Until recently, however, few evolutionary biologists have attempted to identify the properties of cultural transmission that make it an effective way of acquiring behavior. Very different answers to this question have been suggested by (...)
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  29. Robert W. Bradnock & Patricia L. Saunders (2000). Sea-Level Rise, Subsidence and Submergence : The Political Ecology of Environmental Change in the Bengal Delta. In Philip Anthony Stott & Sian Sullivan (eds.), Political Ecology: Science, Myth and Power. Oxford University Press. 66.
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  30. A. Brennan (2002). Asian Traditions of Knowledge: The Disputed Questions of Science, Nature and Ecology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 33 (4):567-581.
    The search for 'ecological insights' in venerable Asian traditions of thought prompts questions about how such traditions understood humans in relation to nature. Answers which focus on philosophical and religious ideas may overlook culturally important understandings of people and places articulated within scientific and medical thinking. The paper tentatively explores the prospects for gleaning a form of ethics of place from the study of traditional Hindu and Chinese medical sources. Although there are serious problems with the idea that any unadulterated (...)
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  31. Gwen J. Broude (2002). Can't We All Just Be Altruistic? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (2):253-254.
    Neither evolutionary theory nor behavioral evidence is consistent with Rachlin's view of altruism as a learned, domain-general learned habit displayed because of its intrinsic value. But human beings can be psychologically motivated by altruism while still reaping a genetic benefit from their altruistic actions.
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  32. Kate Robson Brown (2000). The Meaning of Hominid Species – Culture as Process and Product? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):157-157.
    One implication of Laland, Odling-Smee & Feldman's niche construction model concerns the significance of the role of behavioural or cultural traits in comparative analysis. In this commentary it is suggested that cladistic methods already recognise this importance, and that behavioural characters may play a key role in hominid speciation and the definition of species.
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  33. Raymond L. Bryant (1997). Third World Political Ecology. Routledge.
    The authors review the historical development of the field, explain what is distinctive about Third World political ecology, and suggest areas for future ...
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  34. M. I. Budyko (1974). On the Threshold of a New Science-Global Ecology. Russian Studies in Philosophy 13 (2):17-20.
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  35. F. M. Burnet (1971/1972). Dominant Mammal. New York,St. Martin's Press.
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  36. Chris Buskes (2013). Darwinism Extended: A Survey of How the Idea of Cultural Evolution Evolved. Philosophia 41 (3):661-691.
    In the past 150 years there have been many attempts to draw parallels between cultural and biological evolution. Most of these attempts were flawed due to lack of knowledge and false ideas about evolution. In recent decades these shortcomings have been cleared away, thus triggering a renewed interest in the subject. This paper offers a critical survey of the main issues and arguments in that discussion. The paper starts with an explication of the Darwinian algorithm of evolution. It is argued (...)
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  37. Lawrence Cahoone (2009). Hunting as a Moral Good. Environmental Values 18 (1):67 - 89.
    I argue that hunting is not a sport, but a neo-traditional cultural trophic practice consistent with ecological ethics, including a meliorist concern for animal rights or welfare. Death by hunter is on average less painful than death in wild nature. Hunting achieves goods, including trophic responsibility, ecological expertise and a unique experience of animal inter-dependence. Hunting must then be not only permissible but morally good wherever: a) preservation of ecosystems or species requires hunting as a wildlife management tool; and/or b) (...)
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  38. J. Baird Callicott (1988). Agroecology in Context. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 1 (1):3-9.
    Agriculture and medicine palpably manifest a culture's world view. Correspondingly, changes in agriculture and medicine may be barometers of change in a culture's overall outlook. Conventional industrial agriculture and modern surgical/chemical medicine clearly express the Newtonian mechanical model of nature. The modern classical world view represents nature to be an externally related, atomic, reductive, material, and mechanical aggregate. Modern medicine, correspondingly, treats the body as an elaborate mechanism and industrial agriculture regards soil as a substratum for monocultures assembled from fossil (...)
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  39. Allen Carlson (2000). Placing Nature: Culture and Landscape Ecology. Environmental Ethics 22 (2):211-214.
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  40. Laureano Castro, Luis Castro-Nogueira, Miguel A. Castro-Nogueira & Miguel A. Toro (2010). Cultural Transmission and Social Control of Human Behavior. Biology and Philosophy 25 (3):347-360.
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  41. Gyaneshwer Chaubey, Mait Metspalu, Toomas Kivisild & Richard Villems (2007). Peopling of South Asia: Investigating the Caste–Tribe Continuum in India. Bioessays 29 (1):91-100.
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  42. Paul Chaughard (1968). L'homme Et le Langage. Acta Biotheoretica 18 (1-4).
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  43. Matthew K. Chew (2009). The Monstering of Tamarisk: How Scientists Made a Plant Into a Problem. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 42 (2):231 - 266.
    Dispersal of biota by humans is a hallmark of civilization, but the results are often unforeseen and sometimes costly. Like kudzu vine in the American South, some examples become the stuff of regional folklore. In recent decades, "invasion biology," conservation-motivated scientists and their allies have focused largely on the most negative outcomes and often promoted the perception that introduced species are monsters. However, cases of monstering by scientists preceded the rise of popular environmentalism. The story of tamarisk (Tamarix spp.), flowering (...)
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  44. Mark Coeckelbergh (2013). Pervasion of What? Techno–Human Ecologies and Their Ubiquitous Spirits. AI and Society 28 (1):55-63.
    Are the robots coming? Is the singularity near? Will we be dominated by technology? The usual response to ethical issues raised by pervasive and ubiquitous technologies assumes a philosophical anthropology centered on existential autonomy and agency, a dualistic ontology separating humans from technology and the natural from the artificial, and a post-monotheistic dualist and creational spirituality. This paper explores an alternative, less modern vision of the “technological” future based on different assumptions: a “deep relational” view of human being and self, (...)
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  45. Thomas B. Colwell (1971). The Ecological Basis Of Human Community. Educational Theory 21 (4):418-433.
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  46. Jacqueline Cramer & Wolfgang Daele (1985). Is Ecology an 'Alternative' Natural Science? Synthese 65 (3):347 - 375.
    This article discusses whether ecology represents an alternative type of natural science, that is normatively committed. Central questions are:-how man and human action are integrated into the subject matter of ecology.
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  47. Andrew Cunningham (2001). Science and Religion in the Thirteenth Century Revisited: The Making of St Francis the Proto-Ecologist. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (1):69-98.
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  48. Jennifer Nerissa Davis (2000). A Few Tips on Hypothesis Testing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):600-601.
    Gangestad & Simpson's account of the role of good-gene sexual selection in conditional human mating strategies is reasonably convincing, but could be more so with a little more attention to (1), dropping unnecessary sub hypotheses and especially (2) the inclusion of alternative evolutionary explanations.
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  49. Fernando Dias de Avila-Pires, Luiz Carlos Mior, Vilênia Porto Aguiar & Susana Regina Mello Schlempeder (2000). The Concept of Sustainable Development Revisited. Foundations of Science 5 (3).
    The concept of sustainable development is here revised in the light of a brief historical analysis, followed by a semantic analysis of the expressions development and sustainability. The authors criticize the common use of this concept in a loose way or in wide generalizations, to conclude, based on the principles of human ecology, that it is only possible to make it operational in limited spans of time and in limited spatial units.
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  50. A. De Block & S. Dewitte (2007). Mating Games: Cultural Evolution and Sexual Selection. Biology and Philosophy 22 (4):475-491.
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