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  1. Farid Abdel-Nour (2006). International Human Rights and Islamic Law - by Mashood A. Baderin. Ethics and International Affairs 20 (3):388–390.
  2. Farid Abdel-Nour (2004). Farewell to Justification: Habermas, Human Rights, and Universalist Morality. Philosophy and Social Criticism 30 (1):73-96.
    In his recent work, Jürgen Habermas signals the abandonment of his earlier claims to justify human rights and universalist morality. This paper explains the above shift, arguing that it is the inescapable result of his attempts in recent years to accommodate pluralism. The paper demonstrates how Habermas’s universal pragmatic justification of modern normative standards was inextricably tied to his consensus theory of validity. He was compelled by the structure of that argument to count on the current or future availability of (...)
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  3. Wickramanayake Abeysinghe (2000). In Search of Human Duties Via the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. S. Godage & Brothers.
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  4. Arash Abizadeh (2010). Closed Borders, Human Rights, and Democratic Legitimation. In David Hollenbach (ed.), Driven From Home: Human Rights and the New Realities of Forced Migration. Georgetown University Press.
    Critics of state sovereignty have typically challenged the state’s right to close its borders to foreigners by appeal to the liberal egalitarian discourse of human rights. According to the liberty argument, freedom of movement is a basic human right; according to the equality or justice argument, open borders are necessary to reduce global poverty and inequality, both matters of global justice. I argue that human rights considerations do indeed mandate borders considerably more open than is the norm today but that, (...)
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  5. M. Rodwan Abouharb (2011). International Financial Institutions and Their Impacts on Human Rights. In Thomas Cushman (ed.), Handbook of Human Rights. Routledge. 455.
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  6. Rogaia Mustafa Abusharaf (2006). Competing Masculinities: Probing Political Disputes as Acts of Violence Against Women From Southern Sudan and Darfur. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 7 (2):59-74.
    This article identifies the major forces militating against the promotion of women's rights in the Sudan. These factors are intimately linked to the country's multiple political disputes including Darfur and southern Sudan. The effects of political violence is elaborated through a detailed examination of women’s political, economic and cultural rights. The article concludes by identifying the promotion of good governance and democratization as fundamental pre-requisites for advancing human rights and sustainable peace in the war-torn nation.
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  7. Brooke Ackerly (2011). Human Rights Enjoyment in Theory and Activism. Human Rights Review 12 (2):221-239.
    Despite being a seemingly straightforward moral concept (that all humans have certain rights by virtue of their humanity), human rights is a contested concept in theory and practice. Theorists debate (among other things) the meaning of “rights,” the priority of rights, whether collective rights are universal, the foundations of rights, and whether there are universal human rights at all. These debates are of relatively greater interest to theorists; however, a given meaning of “human rights” implies a corresponding theory of change (...)
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  8. Rebecca Adami (2014). Toward Cosmopolitan Ethics in Teacher Education: An Ontological Dimension of Learning Human Rights. Ethics and Education 9 (1):29-38.
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  9. E. M. Adams (1984). Human Rights. Review of Metaphysics 37 (4):849-851.
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  10. E. M. Adams (1975). Personhood and Human Rights. Man and World 8 (1):36-46.
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  11. E. Maynard Adams (1988). Human Rights and the Social Order. Journal of Value Inquiry 22 (3):167-181.
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  12. Melanie Adrian (2006). La'cit Unveiled: A Case Study in Human Rights, Religion, and Culture in France. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 8 (1):102-114.
    This paper examines the debate around the headscarf in France with the view to critically examining two central arguments put forward by the Stasi Commission for the restriction of the headscarf in French public schools—that the headscarf imperiled public order and that it jeopardized neutrality in the public sphere. In the case of the first argument, this paper argues that France did not meet the threshold requirement necessary to curtail religious rights in public schools. In the case of the second (...)
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  13. Kirsten Ainley (2011). The Implications and Imperfections of Practice. Human Rights Review 12 (2):241-246.
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  14. Şener Aktürk (2007). Perspectives on Daniel Bell's East Asian Challenge to Human Rights. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 3:37-44.
    The paper discusses situation-specific justifications for temporary curtailment of particular human rights, Asian justifications for Western values and human rights practices, and the plausibility of a distinctively East Asian conception of human interest and welfare that may justify a distinctively East Asian human rights regime. The paper argues that the so-called East Asian challenge is the prioritization of social and economic rights over civil and political rights and hence does not represent a culturally specific challenge but rather addresses a debate (...)
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  15. Jose Aldunate (1994). Human Rights as the Rights of the Poor: The Perspective From Liberation Theology. Journal of Moral Education 23 (3):297-303.
    Abstract Liberation Theology has played an important role in the development of the human rights movement in Latin America. This paper gives an outline of its basic perspective on human rights and refers to its historical basis. The Latin American Catholic liberation?theological perspective is described as one important voice in the emergence of a new global ethic centred on human rights. It is profoundly connected with the defence of the rights of the poor to a better life and of indigenous (...)
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  16. Gregory S. Alexander (2014). Intergenerational Communities. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 8 (1):21-57.
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  17. Robert Alexy (2010). The Construction of Constitutional Rights. Law and Ethics of Human Rights 4 (1):21-32.
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  18. Robert Alexy (1996). Discourse Theory and Human Rights. Ratio Juris 9 (3):209-235.
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  19. C. Fred Alford (2010). Narrative, Nature, and the Natural Law: From Aquinas to International Human Rights. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Introduction -- Saint Thomas : putting nature into natural law -- Maritain and the love for the natural law -- The new natural law and evolutionary natural law -- International human rights, natural law, and Locke -- Conclusion : evil and the limits of the natural law.
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  20. Alfred Allan (2013). Are Human Rights Redundant in the Ethical Codes of Psychologists? Ethics and Behavior 23 (4):251-265.
    The codes of ethics and conduct of a number of psychology bodies explicitly refer to human rights, and the American Psychological Association recently expanded the use of the construct when it amended standard 1.02 of the Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct. What is unclear is how these references to human rights should be interpreted. In this article I examine the historical development of human rights and associated constructs and the contemporary meaning of human rights. As human rights (...)
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  21. J. Allen & B. A. Hocking (2010). Unlocking the Alienation: A Comparative Role for Alien Torts Legislation in Post-Colonial Reparations Claims? [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 11 (2):247-276.
    This article continues the themes developed in a previous paper looking at reparations for past wrongs in post-colonial Australia. It narrows the focus to examine the scope of the law of tort to provide reparations suffered as a result of colonisation and dispossession, with particular emphasis on the assimilation policies whose legacy is now known emphatically, although it ought not be exclusively, as the Stolen Generations. The search for more than just words is particularly topical in light of the Australian (...)
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  22. Mark DaCosta Alleyne (2004). The Global Promotion of Gender Equality—A Propaganda Approach. Human Rights Review 5 (3):103-116.
    This paper proposes a new way of measuring progress in international politics, an approach that focuses on the symbolic and ideological work of international organizations. Although such a strategy is not entirely new to the study of International Relations, it has not been a common, accessible way of assessing how well international organizations work to effect change. The more famous methods have been legalistic—investigations of how international organizations have created new international law in the issue-areas under investigation1—and bureaucratic—studies of how (...)
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  23. Peter Allmark (2009). Public Health and Human Rights: Evidence-Based Approaches. Nursing Philosophy 10 (1):62-63.
  24. Wilton D. Alston & Walter E. Block (2008). Reparations, Once Again. Human Rights Review 9 (3):379-392.
    Reparations whether to blacks for slavery, or to Indians for land theft, or to settle any number of other conflicts, has an interesting political background. Analysts on the left, who are usually no friend of private property rights, nevertheless rely on this doctrine to support their case for reparations. Those on the right, in contrast, who supposedly defend the institution of property rights, jettison them when it comes to reparations. It is only libertarians, such as the present authors, who both (...)
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  25. Andrew Altman (2011). Buchanan , Allen . Human Rights, Legitimacy, and the Use of Force .Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010. Pp. 332. $74.00 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Ethics 121 (3):647-651.
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  26. Andrew Altman & Christopher Heath Wellman (2008). From Humanitarian Intervention to Assassination: Human Rights and Political Violence. Ethics 118 (2):228-257.
  27. Fuad Al‐Daraweesh & Dale T. Snauwaert (2013). Toward a Hermeneutical Theory of International Human Rights Education. Educational Theory 63 (4):389-412.
    The purpose of this essay is to articulate and defend the epistemological foundations of international human rights education from the perspective of a hermeneutical interpretive methodology. Fuad Al-Daraweesh and Dale Snauwaert argue here that this methodology potentially alleviates the challenges that face the cross-cultural implementation of human rights education. While acknowledging the necessity of global human rights awareness, the authors maintain that local cultural conceptualization is imperative to the negotiated, local embrace of human rights. A critical, interpretive pedagogy emerges from (...)
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  28. S. E. N. Amartya (2004). Elements of a Theory of Human Rights. Philosophy and Public Affairs 32 (4):315–356.
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  29. Roger T. Ames (1997). Continuing the Conversation on Chinese Human Rights. Ethics and International Affairs 11 (1):177–205.
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  30. Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na'im (2013). An Inclusive Approach to the Mediation of Competing Human Rights Claims. Constellations 20 (1):7-17.
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  31. Abudullahi Ahmed An-Na'im (2009). Toward a Cross-Cultural Approach to Defining International Standards of Human Rights. In Mark Goodale (ed.), Human Rights: An Anthropological Reader. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  32. G. Anderson & M. V. Rorty (2001). Key Points for Developing an International Declaration on Nursing, Human Rights, Human Genetics and Public Health Policy. Nursing Ethics 8 (3):259-271.
    Human rights legislation pertaining to applications of human genetic science is still lacking at an international level. Three international human rights documents now serve as guidelines for countries wishing to develop such legislation. These were drafted and adopted by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, the Human Genome Organization, and the Council of Europe. It is critically important that the international nursing community makes known its philosophy and practice-based knowledge relating to ethics and human rights, and contributes to (...)
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  33. Kevin Anderson (2012). The Lost Promise of Civil Rights by Risa L. Goluboff. Human Rights Review 13 (1):129-130.
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  34. Sharon Anderson-Gold (2007). Human Rights, Cultural Identity, and Democracy. Social Philosophy Today 23:57-68.
    This paper traces the evolution of the international concept of a human right to culture from a general and individual right of participation in the public life of a state (1966, Article 27 of the IC of Civil and Political Rights), to a group right to a cultural identity (1992 Declaration on the rights of persons belonging to national or ethnic, religious or linguistic minorities). I argue that the original generic formulation of the human right to culture reflected the nineteenth-century (...)
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  35. Sharon Anderson-Gold (2004). Terrorism and the Politics of Human Rights. Social Philosophy Today 20:155-164.
    Humanitarian interventions defined as “peace-keeping” missions are becoming an increasingly common occurrence. This paper will consider the relationship between the idea of human rights and the concept of legitimate intervention into the affairs of sovereign nations. I will argue that implicit within the concept of human rights are standards of political legitimacy which render all claims to sovereignty “conditional” upon adherence to these standards. After analyzing how both critics and supporters have viewed human rights interventions, I will consider how the (...)
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  36. Sharon Anderson-Gold (1988). War And Resistance: Kant'S Implicit Doctrine Of Human Rights. Journal of Social Philosophy 19:37-50.
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  37. Sharon Anderson-Gold (1988). War and Resistance: Kant's Doctrine of Human Rights. Journal of Social Philosophy 19 (1):37-50.
  38. P. Andiappan, M. Reavley & S. Silver (1990). Discrimination Against Pregnant Employees: An Analysis of Arbitration and Human Rights Tribunal Decisions in Canada. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 9 (2):143 - 149.
    Recent arbitration and human rights boards of inquiry cases involving discrimination against pregnant employees are reviewed. A comparison is made between remedies available under each procedure. It is suggested that the human resource managers review their policies and procedures relevant to this issue to ensure that they do not have the effect or intent of discriminating against pregnant employees.
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  39. R. Andorno (2009). Human Dignity and Human Rights as a Common Ground for a Global Bioethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (3):223-240.
    The principle of respect for human dignity plays a crucial role in the emerging global norms relating to bioethics, in particular in the UNESCO Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights. This instrument, which is a legal, not merely an ethical document, can be regarded as an extension of international human rights law into the field of biomedicine. Although the Declaration does not explicitly define human dignity, it would be a mistake to see the emphasis put on this notion as (...)
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  40. R. Andorno (2007). Global Bioethics at UNESCO: In Defence of the Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (3):150-154.
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  41. AndreasFollesdal (2006). Subsidiarity, Democracy, and Human Rights in the Constitutional Treaty of Europe. Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (1):61–80.
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  42. George Andreopoulos (2012). Labor Rights as Human Rights? Challenges and Prospects for Collective Bargaining. Human Rights Review 13 (3):369-372.
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  43. George J. Andreopoulos (2010). The International Legal Framework and Armed Groups. Human Rights Review 11 (2):223-246.
    This article explores the contribution of the international legal framework to strategies for exercising leverage over and engaging with non-state armed groups. In addressing the framework’s relevance in meeting these challenges, it examines the tensions between hierarchy and reciprocity in international law; key normative developments in international human rights and international humanitarian laws, the issue of existing gaps in the protective framework envisaged by these two bodies of law, and the impact of their growing intersections; recent trends in the international (...)
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  44. Stephen Angle (2012). Contemporary Confucian and Islamic Approaches to Democracy and Human Rights. Comparative Philosophy 4 (1).
    Both Confucian and Islamic traditions stand in fraught and internally contested relationships with democracy and human rights. It can easily appear that the two traditions are in analogous positions with respect to the values associated with modernity, but a central contention of this essay is that Islam and Confucianism are not analogous in this way. Positions taken by advocates of the traditions are often similar, but the reasoning used to justify these positions differs in crucial ways. Whether one approaches these (...)
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  45. Stephen C. Angle (2005). Concepts, Communication, and the Relevance of Philosophy to Human Rights: A Response to Randall Peerenboom. Philosophy East and West 55 (2):320-324.
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  46. Stephen C. Angle (2005). Must We Choose Our Leaders? Human Rights and Political Participation in China. Journal of Global Ethics 1 (2):177 – 196.
    The essay begins from Alan Gewirth's influential account of human rights, and specifically with his argument that the human right to political participation can only be fulfilled by competitive, liberal democracy. I show that his argument rests on empirical, rather than conceptual grounds, which opens the possibility that in China, alternative forms of participation may be legitimate or even superior. An examination of the theory and contemporary practice of 'democratic centralism' shows that while it does not now adequately support the (...)
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  47. George J. Annas (2009). Human Rights and American Bioethics: Resistance Is Futile. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (01):133-.
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  48. George J. Annas (2004). American Bioethics and Human Rights: The End of All Our Exploring. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (4):658-663.
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  49. R. Anthony-Pillai (2012). Palliative Care Registers: Infringement on Human Rights? Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (4):256-256.
    A personal view made in light of the recent news article regarding a husband wanting to sue Addenbrooke's hospital over a Do Not Attempt Resuscitation decision. This article aims to highlight how the rolling out of cross boundary palliative care registers may be more at risk of infringing human rights.
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  50. Ketty Anyeko, Erin Baines, Emon Komakech, Boniface Ojok, Lino Owor Ogora & Letha Victor (2012). 'The Cooling of Hearts': Community Truth-Telling in Northern Uganda. [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 13 (1):107-124.
    Recent national and international debates on truth and reconciliation in Uganda have emphasized the importance of incorporating local-level mechanisms into a national transitional justice strategy. The Juba Peace Talks represented an opportunity to develop and articulate sufficient and just alternatives and complementary mechanisms to the international criminal model. The most commonly debated mechanism is the Acholi process known as mato oput (drinking the bitter root), a restorative justice approach to murder. Drawing on 2 months of research in nine internally displaced (...)
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