This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
151 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 151
  1. Kenneth Aggerholm & Lars Tore Ronglan (2012). Having The Last Laugh: The Value of Humour in Invasion Games. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 6 (3):336-352.
    This paper provides an existential analysis of humour as a social virtue in invasion games at the elite sport level. The main argument is that humour in this particular context can be valuable both in the competitive social training environment and in game performance. This is investigated through philosophical and psychological conceptualisations of humour that are used to reveal and analyse the appearance and possible value of a humorous approach in various social situations experienced during invasion games and the associated (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Olivier Assouly (2008). Le Capitalisme Esthétique: Essai Sur l'Industrialisation du Goût. Editions du Cerf.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Manuel Ballester Hernández & Enrique Ujaldón (eds.) (2010). La Sonrisa Del Sabio: Ensayos Sobre Humor y Filosofía. Biblioteca Nueva.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Manuel Ballester (2010). La Modernidad Ante El Frío Espejo Del Humor. In Manuel Ballester Hernández & Enrique Ujaldón (eds.), La Sonrisa Del Sabio: Ensayos Sobre Humor y Filosofía. Biblioteca Nueva.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. S. Basu (1999). Dialogic Ethics and the Virtue of Humor. Journal of Political Philosophy 7 (4):378–403.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Memo Bergmann (1986). How Many Feminists Does It Take To Make A Joke? Sexist Humor and What's Wrong With It. Hypatia 1 (1):63-82.
  7. Merrie Bergmann (1986). How Many Feminists Does It Take to Make A Joke? Sexist Humor and What's Wrong with It. Hypatia 1 (1):63 - 82.
    In this paper I am concerned with two questions: What is sexist humor? and what is wrong with it? To answer the first question, I briefly develop a theory of humor and then characterize sexist humor as humor in which sexist beliefs (attitudes/norms) are presupposed and are necessary to the fun. Concerning the second question, I criticize a common sort of argument that is supposed to explain why sexist humor is offensive: although the argument explains why sexist humor feels offensive, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. José Luis Villacañas Berlanga (2010). Kirkegaard : La Posible Tragicomedia. In Manuel Ballester Hernández & Enrique Ujaldón (eds.), La Sonrisa Del Sabio: Ensayos Sobre Humor y Filosofía. Biblioteca Nueva.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. A. K. Bierman (1971). Socratic Humor: Understanding the Most Important Philosophical Argument. Apeiron 5 (2):23 - 42.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Ann Boaden (ed.) (1980). The Masks of Comedy: Papers Delivered at the Humanities Festival, 1978, Augustana College. Augustana College Library.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Robert Borgen (2010). Comic Verse in the Clasical Japanese Literary Tradition. In Hans-Georg Moeller & Günter Wohlfart (eds.), Laughter in Eastern and Western Philosophies: Proceedings of the Académie du Midi. Verlag Karl Alber.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Brian Boyd (2004). Laughter and Literature: A Play Theory of Humor. Philosophy and Literature 28 (1):1-22.
    : Humor seems uniquely human, but it has deep biological roots. Laughter, the best evidence suggests, derives from the ritualized breathing and open-mouth display common in animal play. Play evolved as training for the unexpected, in creatures putting themselves at risk of losing balance or dominance so that they learn to recover. Humor in turn involves play with the expectations we share-whether innate or acquired-in order to catch one another off guard in ways that simulate risk and stimulate recovery. An (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. H. C. Brown (1937). Book Review:The Enjoyment of Laughter. Max Eastman. [REVIEW] Ethics 47 (4):495-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Steven Burns (1989). Reason, Love and Laughter. Dialogue 28 (03):499-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Steven Burns & Alice MacLachlan (2004). Getting It: On Jokes and Art. AE: Journal of the Canadian Society of Aesthetics 10.
    “What is appreciation?” is a basic question in the philosophy of art, and the analogy between appreciating a work of art and getting a joke can help us answer it. We first propose a subjective account of aesthetic appreciation (I). Then we consider jokes (II). The difference between getting a joke and not, or what it is to get it right, can often be objectively articulated. Such explanations cannot substitute for the joke itself, and indeed may undermine the very power (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Thomas A. Burns (1976). Doing the Wash: An Expressive Culture and Personality of a Joke and its Tellers. Folcroft Library Editions.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Thomas A. Burns (1975/1977). Doing the Wash: An Expressive Culture and Personality Study of a Joke and its Tellers. R. West.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Joseph Carpino (1987). The Philosophy of Laughter and Humor. Review of Metaphysics 41 (2):405-406.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Noël Carroll (1999). Horror and Humor. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (2):145-160.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Noël Carroll (1991). On Jokes. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 16 (1):280-301.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Robert E. Carter (2010). Why Do Birds Shit on Buddha's Head" : Zen and Laughter. In Hans-Georg Moeller & Günter Wohlfart (eds.), Laughter in Eastern and Western Philosophies: Proceedings of the Académie du Midi. Verlag Karl Alber.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Peter Cave (2005). Humour and Paradox Laid Bare. The Monist 88 (1):135-153.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. David J. Chalmers, A Taxonomy of Cognitive Jokes.
    This is just a beginning categorization. I claim no 'objective correctness' for it. And of course the categories can be fluid, and the same joke can be a member of more than one category (and perhaps it will be funnier if it is). But thinking about the jokes which I can recall from the Humour Weekend, most seem to fall squarely into one or another category, indicating that perhaps this is a useful way of dividing jokes. It seems to me (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. John H. Claiborne (1972). Laughter and Theory of Action. Southern Journal of Philosophy 10 (3):343-352.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Michael Clark (1987). Humour, Laughter and the Structure of Thought. British Journal of Aesthetics 27 (3):238-246.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Michael Clark (1970). Humour and Incongruity. Philosophy 45 (171):20 - 32.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Alfredo P. Co (2010). Siddhartha, Socrates, and Zhuangzi : Laughter Across Ancient Civilizations. In Hans-Georg Moeller & Günter Wohlfart (eds.), Laughter in Eastern and Western Philosophies: Proceedings of the Académie du Midi. Verlag Karl Alber.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. John Alan Cohan (2003). Is Hunting a “Sport”? International Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (2):291-326.
    This essay discusses the question of whether hunting is a competitive sport. The discussion approaches this issue from several angles. The author asserts that there is an anthropomorphic fallacy that the “superiority” of human beings justifies the “right” to exploit animals. The discussion turns to an historical analysis of how hunting emerged as a “sport.” The author discusses evolving standards of what constitutes acceptable forms of amusement, and the basis of moral criticisms of hunting. The author then claims that the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Carlos Conchillo (2010). Considéreme Usted Un Sueño" : Kafka y El Castillo : Una Aproximación Filosófica. In Manuel Ballester Hernández & Enrique Ujaldón (eds.), La Sonrisa Del Sabio: Ensayos Sobre Humor y Filosofía. Biblioteca Nueva.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Jeremiah Conway (2007). The Humor of Philosophy. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 14 (2):3-10.
    Philosophy has been the butt of jokes throughout history. This paper examines two comedians-Aristophanes and Woody Allen-for what they fmd funny about philosophy. Consideration of this humor is important because it insightfully captures the tensions between philosophy and everyday life. Risking the proverbial waming about ruining good jokes with analysis, the paper takes up the question why an activity that these comedians love to roast, philosophers take seriously.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Stephen Crocker (2010). Laughter as Truth Procedure : The Evolution of Comic Form in Newfoundland. In Hans-Georg Moeller & Günter Wohlfart (eds.), Laughter in Eastern and Western Philosophies: Proceedings of the Académie du Midi. Verlag Karl Alber.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Trevor Curnow (2002). Philosophy & Humour. Philosophy Now 39:37-37.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Paul D'Ambrosio (2010). From Foolish Laughter to Foolish Laughter : Zhuangzi's Perspectivism Leads to Laughter. In Hans-Georg Moeller & Günter Wohlfart (eds.), Laughter in Eastern and Western Philosophies: Proceedings of the Académie du Midi. Verlag Karl Alber.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. C. D. (1963). Comic Laughter. Review of Metaphysics 17 (2):310-310.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. E. M. Dadlez (2011). Truly Funny: Humor, Irony, and Satire as Moral Criticism. Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (1):1-17.
    Comparatively speaking, philosophy has not been especially long-winded in attempting to answer questions about what is funny and why we should think so. There is the standard debate of many centuries’ standing between superiority and incongruity accounts of humor, which for the most part attempt to identify the intentional objects of our amusement.1 There is the more recent debate about humor and morality, about whether jokes themselves may be regarded as immoral or about whether it can in certain circumstances be (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Manuel M. Davenport (1976). An Existential Philosophy of Humor. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 7 (1):169-176.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. J. M. Davis (2013). Pictorial Irony, Parody, and Pastiche: Comic Interpictoriality in the Arts of the 19th and 20th Centuries. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (3):365-367.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Rino Di Silvestro (2009). Le Muse Dell'arte Comica Nel Sublime Delirio Della Commedia Umana: Un Saggio Analitico di Ricerca Scientifica Interdisciplinare Nell'etica E Nell'estetica Del Riso Come Prospettiva Storico-Globale Dal Punto di Vista Socio-Antropologico, Etno-Filologico, Video-Umanistico, Filosofico-Letterario Nel Disincanto Dello Spirito Moderno Tra Passato Arcaico E Presente d'Avanguardia Nel Sublime Delirio Del Mondo Che Verrà. Edilazio.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Francis P. Donnelly· (1934). Humor. Thought 9 (2):286-295.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Denis Dutton, Freedom and the Theatre of Ideas.
    I want to address a number of interrelated issues that confront the modern theatre. My main concern is to ask, why should we have a theatre of ideas ? The theatre of entertainment is unproblematic: though it has an important place in cultural life, it is undemanding, having the essential purpose of amusement. The theatre of ideas, on the other hand, is a theatre that provokes us to think about morality, human relations, history, or politics. What place does a theatre (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. A. Dvorakova (2005). Review: Laughing at Nothing. Humor as a Response to Nihilism. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (1):106-108.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Alena Dvorakova (2004). On Humour. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (1):100-102.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. C. Stephen Evans (1987). Kierkegaard's View of Humor. Faith and Philosophy 4 (2):176-186.
    Many people view humor and a serious religious life as antithetical. This paper attempts to elucidate Kierkegaard’s view of humor, and thereby to explain his claims that humor is essentially linked to a religious life, and that the capacity for humor resides in a deep structure of human existence. A distinction is drawn between humor as a general element in life, and a special sense of humor as a “boundary zone” of the religious life. The latter kind of “humorist” embodies (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. R. E. Ewin (2001). Hobbes on Laughter. Philosophical Quarterly 51 (202):29-40.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Karl Fallend (ed.) (2006). Witz Und Psychoanalyse: Internationale Sichtweisen--Sigmund Freud Revisited. Studienverlag.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Jerry Farber (2007). Toward a Theoretical Framework for the Study of Humor in Literature and the Other Arts. Journal of Aesthetic Education 41 (4):67-86.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Fred Fisher (1974). Musical Humor: A Future as Well as a Past? Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 32 (3):375-383.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. F. R. Fleet (1890/1970). A Theory of Wit and Humour. Port Washington, N.Y.,Kennikat Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. C. J. Fordyce (1930). Humour in Varro and Other Essays. By Harry E. Wedeck, M.A. Pp.112. Oxford: Blackwell, 1929. 6s. Net. The Classical Review 44 (05):201-.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Albert Galvany (2009). Distorting the Rule of Seriousness: Laughter, Death, and Friendship in the Zhuangzi. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (1):49-59.
    The main purpose of this article is to underline the crucial significance of laughter, a hitherto neglected matter in the study of the Zhuangzi. It aims to show that focusing on laughter is beneficial in order to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of some of the most philosophically relevant problems in the Zhuangzi since a careful analysis of the role of laughter may reveal a great deal of debate concerning such issues as life, death, friendship, social relations, and ritual in (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 151