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  1. Alexandra Alván (2013). Estructuras trinitarias en la constitución y conciencia del tiempo en Agustín y Husserl. Estudios de Filosofía 10:11-38.
    El presente artículo busca establecer paralelos entre las propuestas de Edmund Husserl y de San Agustín en torno a la constitución del tiempo por parte de la conciencia. En ese marco, proponemos que ambos autores basan la constitución del tiempo en estructuras trinitarias de la conciencia. Dichas estructuras, a pesar de sus diferencias, coinciden en constar de tres elementos: uno retencional, uno protencional y uno impresional. Además, coinciden ambas propuestas en que lo fundamental de la estructura trinitaria de la conciencia (...)
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  2. Lilian Alweiss (2007). Leaving Metaphysics to Itself. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 15 (3):349 – 365.
    In 'Time and Being' Heidegger claims that the task is to 'cease all overcoming and to leave metaphysics to itself'. This paper asks what it actually means to leave metaphysics to itself, and how we are meant to understand the difference between "leaving metaphysics to itself" and "overcoming metaphysics". To understand this distinction, the paper compares Heidegger's later position with those of Husserl and Wittgenstein and with his own earlier position expressed in Being and Time. While we find different interpretations (...)
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  3. Jerome Ashmore (1974). Essence in Recent Philosophy: Husserl, Whitehead, Santayana. Philosophy Today 18 (3):198-210.
    A comparative study to determine the significance of essence in the doctrine of three philosophers. By his method of reduction husserl disclosed his version of essence and used it to establish phenomenology as a rigorous science and to see phenomena solely as phenomena. Whitehead identified essence with his "eternal objects" and this identification protected his "actual occasions" from the limitations of empiricism. By means of essence seen exclusively as appearance and relations, Santayana supports his ingenious thesis that nothing given exists. (...)
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  4. Jason M. Bell (2011). The German Translation of Royce's Epistemology by Husserl's Student Winthrop Bell: A Neglected Bridge of Pragmatic-Phenomenological Interpretation? The Pluralist 6 (1):46-62.
    Herr Royce ist doch ein bedeutender Denker und darf nur als solcher behandelt werden.("Royce is an important thinker, and may only be treated as such.")Scholars of pragmatism and of phenomenology have observed striking similarities between Josiah Royce and Edmund Husserl, foundational thinkers at the origins of two major philosophical movements whose effects are still strongly felt in the present day—Royce being considered a central founder of American pragmatic idealism, and Husserl of modern German phenomenology. Other scholars have noted striking similarities (...)
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  5. John Bell, Hermann Weyl's Later Philosophical Views: His Divergence From Husserl.
    In what seems to have been his last paper, Insight and Reflection (1954), Hermann Weyl provides an illuminating sketch of his intellectual development, and describes the principal influences—scientific and philosophical—exerted on him in the course of his career as a mathematician. Of the latter the most important in the earlier stages was Husserl’s phenomenology. In Weyl’s work of 1918-22 we find much evidence of the great influence Husserl’s ideas had on Weyl’s philosophical outlook—one need merely glance through the pages of (...)
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  6. Jocelyn Benoist (2006). Phénoménologie ou pragmatisme? Archives de Philosophie 3:415-441.
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  7. Ondrej Beran (2006). Wittgenstein, Husserl, and Heidegger-the Intersubjectivity of Sense. Filosoficky Casopis 54 (4):523-559.
  8. Hermann G. W. Burchard (2014). The Cognitive Gap, Neural Darwinism & Linguistic Dualism —Russell, Husserl, Heidegger & Quine. Open Journal of Philosophy 4 (3):244-264.
    Guided by key insights of the four great philosophers mentioned in the title, here, in review of and expanding on our earlier work (Burchard, 2005, 2011), we present an exposition of the role played by language, & in the broader sense, λογοζ, the Logos, in how the CNS, the brain, is running the human being. Evolution by neural Darwinism has been forcing the linguistic nature of mind, enabling it to overcome & exploit the cognitive gap between an animal and its (...)
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  9. Amit Chaturvedi (2014). Perceiving Reality: Consciousness, Intentionality, and Cognition in Buddhist Philosophy by Christian Coseru (Review). Philosophy East and West 64 (2):506-513.
    In Perceiving Reality: Consciousness, Intentionality, and Cognition in Buddhist Philosophy, Christian Coseru makes the innovative and ambitious argument that the project of Indian Buddhist epistemology, as represented by thinkers in the Yogācāra tradition of Dignāga and Dharmakīrti, is continuous in many of its methods and conclusions with the phenomenological theories of Edmund Husserl and Maurice Merleau-Ponty, as well as with recent naturalistic approaches in epistemology and the philosophy of mind. In Coseru’s reading, Buddhism shares with phenomenology the attitude that metaphysical (...)
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  10. Richard Cobb-Stevens (1974). James and Husserl: The Foundations of Meaning. Martinus Nijhoff.
    INTRODUCTION ". . . a universe unfinished, with doors and windows open to possibilities uncontrollable in advance." A possibility which William James would ...
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  11. Jose Luis del Barco Collazos (1992). Idea y Abstracción En Hume. Anuario Filosófico 25 (3):463-491.
    Hume propounds the aporetic principle of correspondence betwen impres-sions and ideas, in order to solve the problem of the genesis of the ideas. This principle, which lacks universal validity, reduces the idea to image and deprives it of universality. In this way is postulated a rigorous and uni-versal nominalism, which converts the ideas into non referential unities the same as the Urimpressions (Husserl) and sets aside the possibility of metaphysics.
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  12. Føllesdal Dagfinn (2001). Bolzano, Frege and Husserl on Reference and Object. In Juliet Floyd & Sanford Shieh (eds.), Future Pasts: The Analytic Tradition in Twentieth-Century Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 67--80.
  13. Maria Dimova-Cookson (2001). T.H. Green's Moral and Political Philosophy: A Phenomenological Perspective. Palgrave.
    This book offers a new phenomenological interpretation of T.H. Green's (1836-1882) philosophy and political theory. By analyzing his theory of human practice, the moral idea, the common good, freedom and human rights, the book demonstrates that Green joins the same tradition as Kantian and Husserlian transcendentalism. The book offers a reconstruction of Green's idealism and demonstrates its potential to address contemporary debates on the nature of moral agency, positive and negative freedom and on justifying human rights.
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  14. Herbert Dingle (1979). Time in Philosophy and in Physics. Philosophy 54 (207):99 - 104.
    The essay centers on Godel's views on the place of our intuitive concept of time in philosophy and in physics. It presents my interpretation of his work on the theory of relativity, his observations on the relationship between Einstein's theory and Kantian philosophy, as well as some of the scattered remarks in his conversations with me in the seventies-namely, those of the philosophies of Leibniz, Hegel and Husserl-as a successor of Kant-in relation to their conceptions of time.
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  15. Charles J. Dougherty (1980). The Common Root of Husserl's and Peirce's Phenomenologies. New Scholasticism 54 (3):305-325.
  16. Hubert L. Dreyfus (forthcoming). Heidegger's Critique of the Husserl/Searle Account of Intentionality. Social Research.
  17. John J. Drummond (2012). 5 Imagination and Appresentation, Sympathy and Empathy in Smith And. In Christel Fricke & Dagfinn Føllesdal (eds.), Intersubjectivity and Objectivity in Adam Smith and Edmund Husserl. Ontos Verlag. 8--117.
    Can we have objective knowledge of the world? Can we understand what is morally right or wrong? Yes, to some extent. This is the answer given by Adam Smith and Edmund Husserl. Both rejected David Hume’s skeptical account of what we can hope to understand. But they held his empirical method in high regard, inquiring into the way we perceive and emotionally experience the world, into the nature and function of human empathy and sympathy and the role of the imagination (...)
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  18. Daniel J. Dwyer (2004). Wittgenstein, Kant and Husserl on the Dialectical Temptations of Reason. Continental Philosophy Review 37 (3):277-307.
    There is an interesting sense in which philosophical reflection in the transcendental tradition is thought to be unnatural. Kant claims that metaphysical speculation is as natural as breathing and that transcendental critique is necessary to prevent reason from lapsing into a natural dialectic of dogmatism and skepticism. Husserl argues that the critique of theoretical reason is grounded upon a transcending of the natural attitude in which we are at first unjustifiably and naïvely directed toward objects as separate from consciousness. A (...)
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  19. Denis Fisette (1999). Husserl et Fichte. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 3 (2):185-207.
    At first, I introduce two different paths, which lead from Husserl’s phenomenology to classical German philosophy : a. Psychologism: from Kant to the Logical Investigations through Fries, Beneke and Herbart; b. Idealism, from Fichte to Husserl’s late conception of philosophy as transcendental idealism). Then, I argue, in the first section, that Husserl’s transcendental turn after the Logical Investigations could be understood as a kind of idealism, deriving from Fichte. The next part deals mainly with phenomenology’s double meaning : as philosophia (...)
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  20. Nicholas F. Gier (1981). Wittgenstein and Phenomenology: A Comparative Study of the Later Wittgenstein, Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty. State University of New York Press.
  21. Guillermo E. Rosado Haddock (2012). Husserl's Conception of Physical Theories and Physical Geometry in the Time of the Prolegomena: A Comparison with Duhem's and Poincaré's Views. Axiomathes 22 (1):171-193.
    This paper discusses Husserl’s views on physical theories in the first volume of his Logical Investigations, and compares them with those of his contemporaries Pierre Duhem and Henri Poincaré. Poincaré’s views serve as a bridge to a discussion of Husserl’s almost unknown views on physical geometry from about 1890 on, which in comparison even with Poincaré’s—not to say Frege’s—or almost any other philosopher of his time, represented a rupture with the philosophical tradition and were much more in tune with the (...)
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  22. Brian Harding (2005). Epoché, the Transcendental Ego, and Intersubjectivity in Husserl's Phenomenology. Journal of Philosophical Research 30:141-156.
    This essay is concerned with defending Husserl against the criticism that he is insuffi ciently attentive to intersubjectivity. It has two moments; the fi rst articulates what I take to be a general version of the critique and then turns to a discussion of a version derived from Wittgenstein’s private language argument and the ensuing debate regarding this critique between Suzanne Cunningham and Peter Hutcheson. This discussion concludes by noting a general agreement betweenthe two participants that Husserl’s ego is not (...)
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  23. James G. Hart (1995). Husserl and Fichte: With Special Regard to Husserl's Lectures on “Fichte's Ideal of Humanity”. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 12 (2):135-163.
  24. John M. Hems (1968). Husserl and/or Wittgenstein. International Philosophical Quarterly 8 (4):547-578.
  25. Burt Hopkins (2011). Volviendo a Husserl. Reactualizando el contexto filosófico tradicional del “problema” fenomenológico del otro. La Monadología de Leibniz. [REVIEW] Areté. Revista de Filosofía 23 (2):357-379.
    “Back to Husserl: Reclaiming the Traditional Philosophical Context ofthe Phenomenological ‘Problem’ of the Other: Leibniz’s Monadology”. The internalmotivation that led Husserl to revise his early view of the pure Ego as empty ofessential content is traced to the end of explicating his reformulation of phenomenologyas the egology of the concrete transcendental Ego. The necessity ofrecasting transcendental phenomenology as a transcendental idealism that followsfrom this reformulation is presented and the appearance of transcendentalsolipsism of this idealism exposed as unfounded. That the ground (...)
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  26. Burt C. Hopkins (2009). Signification et vérité dans les écrits philosophico-mathématiques de Jacob Klein. Methodos 9.
    La manière dont Jacob Klein rend compte de l’historicité propre aux unités de base de la signification dans la pensée de la Grèce ancienne ainsi que de l’Europe moderne est présentée et étudiée en relation au « sens de l'être » dans la pensée phénoménologique heideggerienne et à la conception husserlienne de la signification ontologique instrumentale du calcul symbolique. Sur le fond des reconstructions kleiniennes des nombres éidétiques dans le Sophiste de Platon et de l’ontologie cartésienne des objets mathématiques indéterminés, (...)
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  27. Burt C. Hopkins (1991). On the Paradoxical Inception and Motivation of Transcendental Philosophy in Plato and Husserl. Man and World 24 (1):27-47.
  28. Edmund Husserl (1974). Kant and the Idea of Transcendental Philosophy. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 5 (3):9-56.
  29. Carlo Ierna (forthcoming). A Letter From Edmund Husserl to Franz Brentano From 29 XII 1889. Husserl Studies:1-8.
    Among the correspondence between Husserl and Brentano kept at the Houghton Library of Harvard University there is a letter from Husserl to Brentano from 29 XII 1889, whose contents were completely unknown until now. The letter is of some significance, both historically as well as systematically for Husserl’s early development, painting a vivid picture of his relation and indebtedness to his teacher Franz Brentano. As in his letter to Stumpf from February 1890, Husserl describes the issues he had encountered during (...)
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  30. Carlo Ierna (2013). Husserl’s Philosophy of Arithmetic in Reviews. The New Yearbook for Phenomonology and Phenomenological Philosophy:198-242.
    This present collection of (translations of) reviews is intended to help obtain a more balanced picture of the reception and impact of Edmund Husserl’s first book, the 1891 Philosophy of Arithmetic. One of the insights to be gained from this non-exhaustive collection of reviews is that the Philosophy of Arithmetic had a much more widespread reception than hitherto assumed: in the present collection alone there already are fourteen, all published between 1891 and 1895. Three of the reviews appeared in mathematical (...)
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  31. Carlo Ierna (2012). La notion husserlienne de multiplicité : au-delà de Cantor et Riemann. Methodos. Savoirs Et Textes 12 (12).
    The concept of a Mannigfaltigkeit in Husserl has been given various interpretations, due to its shifting role in his works. Many authors have been misled by this term, placing it in the context of Husserl’s early period in Halle, while writing the Philosophy of Arithmetic, as a friend and colleague of Georg Cantor.Yet at the time, Husserl distanced himself explicitly from Cantor’s definition and rather took Bernhard Riemann as example, having studied and lectured extensively on Riemann’s theories of space. Husserl’s (...)
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  32. Carlo Ierna (2011). Der Durchgang Durch Das Unmögliche . An Unpublished Manuscript From the Husserl-Archives. Husserl Studies 27 (3):217-226.
    The article introduces and discusses an unpublished manuscript by Edmund Husserl, conserved at the Husserl-Archives Leuven with signature K I 26, pp. 73a–73b. The article is followed by the text of the manuscript in German and in an English translation. The manuscript, titled “The Transition through the Impossible” ( Der Durchgang durch das Unmögliche ), was part of the material Husserl used for his 1901 Doppelvortrag in Göttingen. In the manuscript, the impossible is characterized as the “sphere of objectlessness” ( (...)
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  33. Michael R. Kelly (2009). Quand l'esprit « dit » le temps : la conscience du temps chez Aristote, Augustin et Husserl. Methodos 9.
    Cet essai met en cause la comparaison historique courante qui relie le traitement husserlien de la conscience du temps à la tradition philosophique occidentale par le biais du livre IX des Confessions d’Augustin. Je soutiens notamment que cette comparaison n’est valable qu’à l’égard des leçons sur le temps de 1905 (qui expliquent l’appréhension du temps par le recours à l’étirement de la conscience opéré par la mémoire) et non pour la théorie husserlienne ultérieure, que l’on peut dater autour de 1908 (...)
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  34. Iso Kern (2012). 6 Mengzi (Mencius), Adam Smith and Edmund Husserl on Sympathy and Conscience. In Christel Fricke & Dagfinn Føllesdal (eds.), Intersubjectivity and Objectivity in Adam Smith and Edmund Husserl. Ontos Verlag. 8--139.
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  35. Ted Klein (1974). Husserl's Kantian Meditations. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 5 (3):69-82.
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  36. Stephan Körner (1984). Über philosophische Methoden und Argumente. Grazer Philosophische Studien 22:27-39.
    Hauptthema des Aufsatzes sind philosophische Methoden und Argumente, welche der Begründung allgemeingültiger, philosophischer Prinzipien dienen sollen. Es wird gezeigt, daß die Cartesianische Methode des Zweifels, die transzendentale Methode Kants und die phänomenologische Methode Husserls diese Aufgabe nicht erfüllen, daß sie aber, wenn man von ihren Ausschließlichkeitsansprüchen absieht, wichtige Einsichten enthalten. Selbst die sogenannte "wissenschaftliche" und die sogenannte "linguistische" Methode erweisen sich trotz ihrer Zirkularität als nicht völlig wertlos. Der Aufsatz schließt mit einigen Bemerkungen über Argumentationsweisen, welche bescheidenere Ziele verfolgen und (...)
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  37. Jean-Francois Lavigne (2003). Husserl lecteur d'Avenarius: Une contribution à la genèse de la réduction phénoménologique? Kairos 22:61-82.
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  38. B. Leclercq & S. Galetic (2012). James and Husserl. Perception of Form and Polarization of Conscience Fluxes. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 66 (260).
  39. Bruno Leclercq (2011). Noème perceptuel : Ameublement du monde et identité des objets à travers les mondes possibles. Bulletin d'Analyse Phénoménologique.
    La question de la spécificité du noème perceptuel et de sa relative autonomie à l?égard du noème conceptuel, question qui a occupé tout un pan des réflexions husserliennes depuis ses premiers travaux dans la proximité de Carl Stumpf jusqu?à ses ultimes recherches sur les synthèses perceptives du monde de la vie, mais qui a aussi retenu l?attention principale de certains héritiers de Husserl comme Aron Gurwitsch ou Maurice Merleau-Ponty, pourrait bien constituer aujourd?hui la clé d?une préoccupation qui fut quant à (...)
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  40. Bruno Leclercq (2008). Les données immédiates de la conscience. Neutralité métaphysique et psychologie descriptive chez James et Husserl. Philosophiques 35 (2):317-344.
  41. B. Leclerq & S. Galetic (2012). James et Husserl : Perception des formes et polarisation des flux de conscience. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 2:229-250.
  42. Xiaoli Liu (2010). Gödel's Philosophical Program and Husserl's Phenomenology. Synthese 175 (1):33 - 45.
    Gödel’s philosophical rationalism includes a program for “developing philosophy as an exact science.” Gödel believes that Husserl’s phenomenology is essential for the realization of this program. In this article, by analyzing Gödel’s philosophy of idealism, conceptual realism, and his concept of “abstract intuition,” based on clues from Gödel’s manuscripts, I try to investigate the reasons why Gödel is strongly interested in Husserl’s phenomenology and why his program for an exact philosophy is unfinished. One of the topics that has attracted much (...)
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  43. Sebastian Luft (2007). From Being to Givenness and Back: Some Remarks on the Meaning of Transcendental Idealism in Kant and Husserl. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 15 (3):367 – 394.
    This paper takes a fresh look at a classical theme in philosophical scholarship, the meaning of transcendental idealism, by contrasting Kant's and Husserl's versions of it. I present Kant's transcendental idealism as a theory distinguishing between the world as in-itself and as given to the experiencing human being. This reconstruction provides the backdrop for Husserl's transcendental phenomenology as a brand of transcendental idealism expanding on Kant: through the phenomenological reduction Husserl universalizes Kant's transcendental philosophy to an eidetic science of subjectivity. (...)
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  44. Paul MacDonald (2007). Husserl, the Monad and Immortality. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 7 (2).
    In an Appendix to his Analyses Concerning Passive and Active Synthesis dating from the early 1920s, Husserl makes the startling assertion that, unlike the mundane ego, the transcendental ego is immortal. The present paper argues that this claim is an ineluctable consequence of Husserl’s relentless pursuit of the ever deeper levels of time-constituting consciousness and, at the same time, of his increasing reliance on Leibniz’s model of monads as the true unifiers of all things, including minds. There are many structural (...)
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  45. S. K. Maharana (2009). Phenomenology of Consciousness in Ādi Śamkara and Edmund Husserl. Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 9 (1).
    The philosophical investigation of consciousness has a long-standing history in both Indian and Western thought. The conceptual models and analyses that have emerged in one cultural framework may be profitably reviewed in the light of another. In this context, a study of the notion of consciousness in the transcendental phenomenology of Edmund Husserl is not only important as a focus on a remarkable achievement in the context of Western thought, but is also useful for an appreciation of the concern with (...)
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  46. S. K. Maharana (2006). On Consciousness: Lord Buddha and Edmund Husserl. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 33 (2):171.
  47. Timo Miettinen (2012). On the Philosophical Foundations of Universalism: Reason, Task, Critique. SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 13 (1):19-38.
    This article investigates the philosophical history of European universalism with the aim of differentiating between its two senses: the modern and the Ancient. Based on Edmund Husserl’s late interpretations on the unique character of Greek philosophy, this distinction is articulated in terms of “substantial” and “formal” accounts of universalism. Against the modern (substantial) idea of universalism, which took its point of departure especially from the natural law theories of the early modern period, Husserl conceived Greek universalism as an essentially formal (...)
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  48. J. N. Mohanty (1996). Kant and Husserl. Husserl Studies 13 (1):19-30.
  49. Jitendra N. Mohanty (1972). Phenomenology and Existentialism. International Philosophical Quarterly 12 (4):485-511.
    The article seeks a confrontation between phenomenology - in its husserlian and existential forms - with indian philosophy, Particularly the nyaya--Vaisesika, Samkhya--Vedanta and buddhist schools. Confrontation with husserlian phenomenology is carried through under three headings: (a) methodology, (b) theory of the 'eidos' and (c) the notion of transcendental subjectivity. Despite close affinities, Indian thought is found to lack the dialectics of intention and fulfillment and the supposed temporality and historicity of transcendental subjectivity. The existential concepts of 'sorge' and 'geworfenheit' are (...)
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  50. Tim Mooney, Deconstruction, Process and Openness: Philosophy in Derrida, Husserl and Whitehead.
    An attempt to compare the approaches of Alfred North Whitehead and Jacques Derrida might appear extremely unrewarding from the outset. Derrida has often been hailed (and reviled) as a figure who rejects many key concepts in the philosophical lexicon, amongst them those of subjectivity, rationality, creativity and progress. Whitehead, on the other hand, may seem to hold uncritically to the notion of a metaphysical system in which every element of our experience can be interpreted, so that everything of which we (...)
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