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  1. Jairo José da Silva (2010). Beyond Leibniz : Husserl's Vindication of Symbolic Knowledge. In Mirja Hartimo (ed.), Phenomenology and Mathematics. Springer.
  2. Theodorus de Boer (1978). The Development of Husserl's Thought. Nijhoff.
    INTRODUCTION In the first part of this study I will deal with the publications of Husserl's first period, ie Ueber den Begriff der Zahl (his "Habilita- ...
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  3. Marvin Farber (1940). Edmund Husserl and the Background of His Philosophy. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 1 (1):1-20.
  4. Denis Fisette (2012). Phenomenology and Phenomenalism: Ernst Mach and the Genesis of Husserl's Phenomenology. [REVIEW] Axiomathes 22 (1):53-74.
    How do we reconcile Husserl’s repeated criticism of Mach’s phenomenalism almost everywhere in his work with the leading role that Husserl seems to attribute to Mach in the genesis of his own phenomenology? To answer this question, we shall examine, first, the narrow relation that Husserl establishes between his phenomenological method and Mach’s descriptivism. Second, we shall examine two aspects of Husserl’s criticism of Mach: the first concerns phenomenalism and Mach’s doctrine of elements, while the second concerns the principle of (...)
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  5. Guillaume Fréchette (2010). L'intentionnalité et le caractère qualitatif des vécus.Husserl, Brentano et Lotze. Studia Phaenomenologica 10:91-117.
    Lotze’s influence on the development of the XIXth and XXth century philosophy and psychology remains largely neglected still today. In this paper, I examine some Lotzean elements in Husserl’s early conception of intentionality, and more specifically in his rejection of the Brentanian concept of intentionality. I argue that Husserl and Lotze, pace Brentano, share a qualitative conception of experiences, what they both call the Zumutesein of experiences. Furthermore, I discuss other issues upon which Husserl and Lotze share common intuitions: the (...)
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  6. Amedeo Giorgi (2009). The Philosophy of Edmund Husserl: A Historical Development. Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 40 (2):211-213.
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  7. Kai Hauser (2003). Lotze and Husserl. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 85 (2):152-178.
  8. Claire Ortiz Hill (2004). Abstraction and Idealization in Edmund Husserl and Georg Cantor Prior to 1895. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 82 (1):217-244.
    Little is known of Edmund Husserl's direct encounter with Georg Cantor's ideas on Platonic idealism and the abstraction of number concepts during the late 19th century, when Husserl's philosophical orientation changed considerably and definitely. Closely analyzing and comparing the two men's writings during that important time in their intellectual careers, I describe the crucial shift in Husserl's views on psychologism and metaphysical idealism as it relates to Cantor's philosophy of arithmetic. I thus establish connections between their ideas which have been (...)
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  9. Claire Ortiz Hill (1997). Did Georg Cantor Influence Edmund Husserl? Synthese 113 (1):145-170.
    Few have entertained the idea that Georg Cantor, the creator of set theory, might have influenced Edmund Husserl, the founder of the phenomenological movement. Yet an exchange of ideas took place between them when Cantor was at the height of his creative powers and Husserl in the throes of an intellectual struggle during which his ideas were particularly malleable and changed considerably and definitively. Here their writings are examined to show how Husserl's and Cantor's ideas overlapped and crisscrossed in the (...)
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  10. Wolfgang Huemer (2004). Husserl's Critique of Psychologism and His Relation to the Brentano School. In Arkadiusz Chrudzimski & Wolfgang Huemer (eds.), Phenomenology and Analysis: Essays on Central European Philosophy. Ontos.
  11. Carlo Ierna (2006). The Beginnings of Husserl's Philosophy. Part 2: Mathematical and Philosophical Background. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 6 (1):23-71.
    The article examines the development of Husserl’s early philosophy from his Habilitationsschrift (1887) to the Philosophie der Arithmetik (1891). -/- An attempt will be made at reconstructing the lost Habilitationsschrift (of which only the first chapter survives, which we know as Über den Begriff der Zahl). The examined sources show that the original version of the Habilitationsschrift was by far broader than the printed version, and included most topics of the PA. -/- The article contains an extensive and detailed comparison (...)
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  12. Carlo Ierna (2005). The Beginnings of Husserl's Philosophy. Part 1: From "Über den Begriff der Zahl" to "Philosophie der Arithmetik&Quot;. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 5:1-56.
    The article examines the development of Husserl’s early philosophy from his Habilitationsschrift (1887) to the Philosophie der Arithmetik (1891). -/- An attempt will be made at reconstructing the lost Habilitationsschrift (of which only the first chapter survives, which we know as Über den Begriff der Zahl). The examined sources show that the original version of the Habilitationsschrift was by far broader than the printed version, and included most topics of the PA. -/- The article contains an extensive and detailed comparison (...)
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  13. Carlo Ierna (2003). Husserl and the Infinite. Studia Phaenomenologica 3 (1-2):179-194.
    In the article Husserl’s view of the infinite around 1890 is analysed. I give a survey of his mathematical background and other important influences (especially Bolzano). The article contains a short exposition on Husserl's distinction between proper and symbolic presentations in the "Philosophie der Arithmetik" and between finite and infinite symbolic collections. Subsequently Husserl’s conception of surrogate presentations in his treatise "Zur Logik der Zeichen (Semiotik)" is discussed. In this text Husserl gives a detailed account of infinity, using surrogate presentations. (...)
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  14. Rhoda H. Kotzin (1985). The Development of Husserl's Thought. International Studies in Philosophy 17 (3):99-101.
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  15. E. Z. M. (1981). The Development of Husserl's Thought. Review of Metaphysics 34 (3):605-606.
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  16. J. N. Mohanty (1995). The Development of Husserl's Thought. In Barry Smith & David Woodruff Smith (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Husserl (Cambridge Companions to Philosophy). Cambridge University Press. 45.
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  17. Richard T. Murphy (1986). Husserl and British Empiricism (1886-1895). Research in Phenomenology 16 (1):121-137.
  18. Richard T. Murphy (1980). Husserl's Relations to British Empiricism. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 11 (3):89-106.
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  19. Andrew Delbridge Osborn (1934). The Philosophy of Edmund Husserl in its Development From His Mathematical Interests to His First Concept of Phenomenology in Logical Investigations. [S.N.].
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  20. Bob Sandmeyer (2014). J. N. Mohanty: Edmund Husserl's Freiburg Years, 1916–1938. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 30 (1):71-76.
    This work, a significant achievement by itself, completes J. N. Mohanty’s comprehensive two-volume study of Edmund Husserl’s body of writings. With the publication of this second volume, Mohanty has produced an immensely detailed and profound analysis of Husserl’s philosophy. At nearly one thousand pages for both volumes, the scale of this achievement cannot be overstated. As Robert Sokolowski notes in his review of the first volume (Husserl Studies 25, p. 256), Mohanty’s work offers an immeasurably helpful manual for those who (...)
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  21. Herbert Spiegelberg (1978). On the Significance of the Correspondence Between Franz Brentano and Edmund Husserl. Grazer Philosophische Studien 5:95-116.
    This correspondence, still unpublished, extends over fourty years. Its significance is both biographical and philosophical. Biographically it shows Brentano's tolerant friendship for his emancipated student and Husserl's unwavering veneration for his only philosophical teacher. The philosophical issues taken up are Euclidean axiomatics, Husserl's departure from Brentano in the Logical Investigations by distinguishing two types of logic as the way out from psychologism, and the possibility of negative presentations, but not Husserl's new phenomenology. Few agreements are reached, but the dissents were (...)
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  22. Peter Andras Varga (forthcoming). Was Hat Husserl in Wien Außerhalb von Brentanos Philosophie Gelernt? Über Die Einflüsse Auf den Frühen Husserl Jenseits von Brentano Und Bolzano. Husserl Studies:1-27.
    Husserl has undoubtedly considered himself being influenced by Brentano, but his conflicts with the orthodox core of the School of Brentano raise the question whether his adherence to Brentano suffices to adequately grasp the context of his early philosophy. I investigate the biographical details of Husserl’s studies in Vienna to uncover hitherto unknown ties between Husserl and Austrian philosophers outside the School of Brentano. Already during his secondary school studies in the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy Husserl was exposed to the philosophy textbooks (...)
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  23. Peter Andras Varga (2010). Psychologism as Positive Heritage of Husserl's Phenomenological Philosophy. Studia Phaenomenologica 10:135-161.
    Husserl is famous for his critique of foundational psychologism. However, his relationship to psychologism is not entirely negative. His conception of philosophy is indebted also to nineteenth-century ideas of a psychological foundation of logic and philosophy. This is manifest both in historical influences on Husserl and in debates between Husserl and his contemporaries. These areas are to be investigated, with a particular focus on the Logical Investigations and the works from the period of Husserl’s transition to the transcendental phenomenology. It (...)
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  24. W. H. Werkmeister (1968). Husserl Und Kant: Eine Untersuchung Über Husserls Verhältnis Zu Kant Und Zum neuKantianismus. Journal of the History of Philosophy 6 (1).
  25. A. Wilson (1969). Husserl and the 'Idealists'. Telos 1969 (4):83-94.
  26. Hedwig Wingler (1987). Husserl and Early Positivism. Philosophy and History 20 (2):149-151.
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