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  1. Meter Amevans (1955). Mead and Husserl on the Self. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 15 (3):320-331.
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  2. Robert Arp (2004). Husserl and the Penetrability of the Transcendental and Mundane Spheres. Human Studies 27 (3):221-239.
    There is a two-fold problem the phenomenologist must face: the first has to do with thinking like a phenomenologist given that one is always already steeped in the mundane sphere; the second has to do with the phenomenologist entering into dialogue with those scientists, psychologists, sociologists and other laypersons who still remain in the mundane sphere. I address the first problem by giving an Husserlian-inspired account of the movement from the mundane to the transcendental, and show that there are decent (...)
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  3. Jaime Villanueva Barreto (2009). El motivo trascendental en Kant y Husserl. Estudios de Filosofía 39:55-80.
  4. R. Bernet (2010). Transzendentale Phänomenologie? In Carlo Ierna, Hanne Jaccobs & Filip Mattens (eds.), PHILOSOPHY PHENOMENOLOGY SCIENCES. Springer 41--70.
  5. Ronald Bruzina (1986). The Enworlding (Verweltlichung) of Transcendental Phenomenological Reflection: A Study of Eugen Fink's “6th Cartesian Meditation”. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 3 (1):3-29.
  6. Havi Carel & Darian Meacham (eds.) (2013). Phenomenology and Naturalism: Volume 72: Examining the Relationship Between Human Experience and Nature. Cambridge University Press.
    What is the relationship between phenomenology and naturalism? Are they mutually exclusive or is a rapprochement possible between their approaches to consciousness and the natural world? Can phenomenology be naturalised and ought it to be? Or is naturalism fundamentally unable to accommodate phenomenological insights? How can phenomenological method be used within a naturalistic research programme? This cutting-edge collection of original essays contains brilliant contributions from leading phenomenologists across the world. The collection presents a wide range of fascinating and carefully argued (...)
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  7. David Carr (2003). Transcendental and Empirical Subjectivity. The Self in the Transcendental Tradition. In Donn Welton (ed.), The New Husserl: A Critical Reader. Bloomington: Indiana University Press 181--198.
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  8. David Carr (1977). Kant, Husserl, and the Nonempirical Ego. Journal of Philosophy 74 (11):682-690.
  9. Carlos Ribeiro de Moura (2006). Husserl: significação e fenômeno. Dois Pontos 3 (1).
    resumo O objetivo deste artigo é discutir o modo como Husserl desenha a originalidade da subjetividade transcendental, frente à sua homônima psicológica. Se é certo que a noção de “imanência autêntica” pode apontar para as diferentes fronteiras entre o transcendental e o psicológico, resta que por si só ela não permite decidir nada quanto ao “modo de ser” transcendental, em sua diferença face ao “mundano”. Sendo assim, procura-se reconstituir alguns dos momentos centrais do esforço husserliano para construir um conceito de (...)
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  10. Kseniya Dmytrenko (2013). Nachfolge der transzendentalen und mundanen Phänomenologie als Voraussetzung empirisch phänomenologischer Forschung. Schutzian Research. A Yearbook of Worldly Phenomenology and Qualitative Social Science 5 (2013):49-64.
    In the background of accelerated interdisciplinary development of phenomenology, there appears more clearly a deficiency of the epistemological groundingand methodological explanation of present research. This is particularly evident in the field of social phenomenology, in which the research positions extend fromthat of the “orthodox” transcendental phenomenologists to an endless search for a new foundation for pragmatic social phenomenology in philosophical anthropology, to a vague thesis about “fruitful discussion” between E. Husserl and A. Schutz. The main task of this article consists (...)
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  11. John J. Drummond (2008). The Transcendental and the Psychological. Husserl Studies 24 (3):193-204.
    This paper explores the emergence of the distinctions between the transcendental and the psychological and, correlatively, between phenomenology and psychology that emerge in The Idea of Phenomenology. It is argued that this first attempt to draw these distinctions reveals that the conception of transcendental phenomenology remains infected by elements of the earlier conception of descriptive psychology and that only later does Husserl move to a more adequate—but perhaps not yet fully purified—conception of the transcendental.
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  12. William P. Fay (1987). The Philosophical Role of the World in Husserl's Phenomenology. Dissertation, The Catholic University of America
    The concept of the world occupies a significant place in the phenomenological philosophy of Edmund Husserl. Unfortunately, however, Husserl's teaching concerning the world can be as problematic to his readers as it is central to his work, and this for two reasons. First, in reading Husserl one encounters the ever-present difficulty of knowing when Husserl's analyses take place within what Husserl calls the "natural" attitude and when they are being philosophically or "transcendentally" executed. As a consequence, Husserl's reader is often (...)
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  13. Anthony Vincent Fernandez (2015). Contaminating the Transcendental: Toward a Phenomenological Naturalism. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 29 (3):291-301.
    Edmund Husserl, in The Crisis of European Sciences and Transcendental Phenomenology, stumbles upon a curious paradox. He asks: How can I be a subject for the world, that is, the subject that constitutes the world, while at the same time being an object in the world? In other words, how can I be the very foundation of the world that my life seems to depend upon? In spite of the difficulties inherent in such a paradox, Husserl put forward a solution.1 (...)
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  14. Robert Hanna (2015). Transcendental Normativity and the Avatars of Psychologism. In Andrea Staiti (ed.), Commentary on Husserl's "Ideas I". De Gruyter 51-68.
  15. Richard Hood Holmes (1972). Husserl's Transcendental Turn. Dissertation, Washington University
  16. William Horosz (1974). Does Husserl's Reach Exceed His Grasp? Philosophy Today 18 (3):181-197.
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  17. Arun Iyer (2010). Transcendental Subjectivity, Embodied Subjectivity and Intersubjectivity in Husserl's Transcendental Idealism. In Pol Vandevelde & Sebastian Luft (eds.), Epistemology, Archaeology, Ethics: Current Investigations of Husserl's Corpus. Continuum
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  18. Hanne Jacobs (2014). Transcendental Subjectivity and the Human Being. In Sara Heinämaa Mirja Hartimo & Timo Miettinen (eds.), Phenomenology and the Transcendental. Routledge 87-105.
    This article addresses an ambiguity in Edmund Husserl’s descriptions of what it means to be a human being in the world. On the one hand, Husserl often characterizes the human being in natural scientific terms as a psychophysical unity. On the other hand, Husserl also describes how we experience ourselves as embodied persons that experience and communicate with others within a socio-historical world. The main aim of this article is to show that if one overlooks this ambiguity then one will (...)
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  19. Mahmoud Khatami (2002). Depa Rtm Ent of Philosoph Y University Oftehran. Iran Kant and Husserl on the Transcendental a Revised Analysis. Existentia 12:365.
  20. Mahmoud Khatami (2002). Kant and Husserl on the Transcendental: A Revised Analysis. Existentia 12 (3-4):365-376.
  21. Paul Kidder (1987). Husserl's Paradox. Research in Phenomenology 17 (1):227-242.
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  22. Christian Lotz (2007). Cognitivism and Practical Intentionality: A Critique of Dreyfus's Critique of Husserl. International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (2):153-166.
    Hubert L. Dreyfus has worked out a critique of what he calls “representationalism” and “cognitivism,” one proponent of which, according to Dreyfus, is Husserl. But I think that Dreyfus misunderstands the Husserlian conception of practical intentionality and that his characterization of Husserl as a “representationalist” or as a “cognitivist” is thereby wrongheaded. In this paper I examine Dreyfus’s interpretation by offering a Husserlian critique of Dreyfus’s objections to Husserl, and then by outlining Husserl’s account of practical intentionality and the practical (...)
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  23. Sebastian Luft (2008). The Transcendental Dimension of Phenomenology. Dialogos 43 (91):7-18.
    This short text to follow is an attempt at philosophizing "free-style"; an attempt, that is, which does not concern itself with much recourse to primary or secondary literature. Hence, references to texts by the philosophers mentioned here are kept to a minimum. The purpose of this text, instead, is to initiate a "fundamental reflection", as one could call it, on the nature of phenomenology. May the reader indulge me in this free-styling activity, and I would welcome equally unburdened responses.
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  24. Sebastian Luft (2005). Husserl's Concept of the 'Transcendental Person': Another Look at the Husserl-Heidegger Relationship. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 13 (2):141 – 177.
    This paper offers a further look at Husserl's late thought on the transcendental subject and the Husserl-Heidegger relationship. It attempts a reconstruction of how Husserl hoped to assert his own thoughts on subjectivity vis-à-vis Heidegger, while also pointing out where Husserl did not reach the new level that Heidegger attained. In his late manuscripts, Husserl employs the term 'transcendental person' to describe the transcendental ego in its fullest 'concretion'. I maintain that although this concept is a consistent development of Husserl's (...)
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  25. Sebastian Luft, Husserl's Notion of the Natural Attitude and the Shift to Transcendental Phenomenology.
  26. James Mensch (2005). Manifestation and the Paradox of Subjectivity. Husserl Studies 21 (1):35-53.
    The question of who we are is a perennial one in philosophy. It is particularly acute in transcendental philosophy with its focus on the subject. In its attempt to see in the subject the structures and activities that determine experience, such philosophy confronts what Husserl called “the paradox of human subjectivity.” This is the paradox of its two-fold being. It has “both the being of a subject for the world and the being of an object in the world.” As the (...)
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  27. Izchak Miller (1986). Husserl on the Ego. Topoi 5 (2):157-162.
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  28. Luciana O'Dwyer (1984). Exploring the Transcendental Dimensions in Husserl, Before Husserl, Beyond Husserl. Critical Philosophy 1 (2):41.
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  29. Martina Roesner (2012). Zwischen transzendentaler Genese und faktischer Existenz. Konfigurationen des Lebensbegriffs bei Natorp, Husserl und Heidegger. Husserl Studies 28 (1):61-80.
    Die vorliegende Studie befasst sich mit der Deutung, die der so vielschichtige Begriff des Lebens Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts in der neukantianischen Transzendentalphilosophie sowie in der Phänomenologie erfahren hat. Am Beispiel von Natorp, Husserl und Heidegger werden verschiedene Ansätze analysiert, die darauf abzielen, den Lebensbegriff aus seinen vitalistischen und historistischen Verengungen zu befreien und zur Deutung der Grundstrukturen des Bewusstseins bzw. der faktischen Existenz heranzuziehen. Dabei zeichnet sich eine Entwicklung ab, die von einer wenig differenzierten Verwendung des Lebensbegriffs als Synonym (...)
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  30. Rocco Sacconaghi (2011). Intrascendibilità Dell’Esperienza E Atteggiamento Naturale in Merleau-Ponty. Acme 64 (3):165-182.
    In this paper I show how Merleau-Ponty comes to identify the natural attitude and the original experience of the world, thus distinguishing his approach sharply from Husserl’s. I conduct my analysis along the line of Merleau-Ponty’s interpretation of some fundamental concepts in Husserl’s phenomenology. In particular, I identify the origin of Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenological perspective in his ontological interpretation of the Husserlian concepts “empirical” and “transcendental”. This move entails an implicit ontologization that undergirds his late endeavors towards a new ontology. Merleau-Ponty (...)
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  31. Rocco Sacconaghi (2011). Intrascendibilità Dell’Esperienza E Atteggiamento Naturale in Merleau-Ponty. Acme 64 (3):165-182.
    In this paper I show how Merleau-Ponty comes to identify the natural attitude and the original experience of the world, thus distinguishing his approach sharply from Husserl’s. I conduct my analysis along the line of Merleau-Ponty’s interpretation of some fundamental concepts in Husserl’s phenomenology. In particular, I identify the origin of Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenological perspective in his ontological interpretation of the Husserlian concepts “empirical” and “transcendental”. This move entails an implicit ontologization that undergirds his late endeavors towards a new ontology. Merleau-Ponty (...)
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  32. Yoshimichi Saito (1991). The Transcendental Dimension of “Praxis” in Husserl's Phenomenology. Husserl Studies 8 (1):17-31.
  33. Michael K. Shim (2005). The Paradox of Subjectivity. Husserl Studies 21 (2):139-144.
    In this elegant, smoothly written book, David Carr provides nothing less than a defense of both Kantian and Husserlian versions of transcendental philosophy against Heidegger’s critique of metaphysics. Carr’s Paradox of Subjectivity is organized into four parts. In the first part, Carr provides a synopsis of Heidegger’s interpretation of traditional metaphysics. Part two is devoted to a reconstruction of Kant’s transcendental theory of subjectivity. The third part deals with Husserl’s conception of transcendental subjectivity. Finally, in part four, Carr proposes to (...)
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  34. Robert Sokolowski (2000). Transcendental Phenomenology. The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 7:233-241.
    Transcendental phenomenology is the mind’s self-discovery in the presence of intelligible objects. I differentiate the phenomenological sense of “transcendental” from its scholastic and Kantian senses, and show how the transcendental dimension cannot be eliminated from human discourse. I try to clarify the difference between prephilosophical uses of reason and the phenomenological use, and I suggest that the method followed by transcendental phenomenology is the working out of strategic distinctions. Its targets are the various blends of presence and absence that make (...)
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  35. James Calvin Spencer (1974). Edmund Husserl's Conception of the Transcendental: A Critical Analysis. Dissertation, State University of New York at Buffalo
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  36. Saranindranath Tagore (1990). Reading Hume with Husserl. Dissertation, Purdue University
    Husserl remarked that Hume's Treatise played an important role in his own philosophical development. He commented at various places on the transcendental nature of Hume's thought, and claimed that Hume was the first to discover the central problems of transcendental philosophy. In this dissertation, following Husserl's insights, I develop a transcendental interpretation of Hume's Treatise. ;I open the work, in the second chapter, by putting together Husserl's expressed opinion about the transcendental nature of Hume's philosophy. Then, using the transcendental projects (...)
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  37. L. Tengelyi (2010). Der methodologische Transzendentalismus der Phänomenologie. In Carlo Ierna, Hanne Jaccobs & Filip Mattens (eds.), PHILOSOPHY PHENOMENOLOGY SCIENCES. Springer 135--153.
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  38. László Tengelyi (2013). Agonistic World Projects: Transcendentalism Versus Naturalism. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 27 (3):236-252.
    Kantian transcendental philosophy has shown that we can never decide the question of whether or not the world is infinite in space and time, because, in the field of appearance, the world as a totality of concordant experience "does not exist as [an unconditioned] whole, either of infinite or of finite magnitude."1 However, appearances are encountered in a world, in which one aspect of a thing always invites us to consider others, indicating thereby a road to infinity. According to a (...)
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  39. Teo Vadnjal (unknown). The Place of Subjectivity between Transcendental and Natural Attitude. Phainomena 70.
    Husserl and Fink have both brought the understanding of transcendental phenomenology to its radical consequences. Where is the place of the phenomenologist between the transcendental and natural? Whereas Husserl answered this just in a implicit way, Fink put it as the main theme of his 6. Cartesian Meditation. The main topic that concerns this question is phenomenological self-understanding itself. How is possible to mediate it sense? Their common answer was that is possible just in the relation with the pregiveness of (...)
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  40. Jaime Javier Villanueva Barreto (2009). The Transcendental Motive in Kant and Husserl. Estudios de Filosofía 39:55-80.
  41. Gerhard Wagner (1992). "Hinweise auf": Elling Schwabe-Hansen: Das verhältnis Von transzendentaler und konkreter subjektivität in der phänomenologie husserls. Philosophische Rundschau 39 (3):253-256.
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  42. Helmut R. Wagner (1984). The Limitations of Phenomenology: Alfred Schutz's Critical Dialogue with Edmund Husserl. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 1 (1):179-199.
  43. Robert Hugo Ziegler (2013). In den Bogenmaßen des Seins. Zum Transzendentalen Bei Husserl Und Deleuze. Husserl Studies 29 (2):89-111.
    Obwohl Husserl und Deleuze ihre Philosophien unter den Leitbegriff des Transzendentalen stellen, scheint es schwer, sie in ein konstruktives Gespräch miteinander zu bringen. Zu einer solchen produktiven Konfrontation soll hier der Versuch unternommen werden, indem die von der Mathematik des 19. Jahrhunderts inspirierte Idee der Mannigfaltigkeit als zentraler Operator bei Deleuze wie auch bei Husserl identifiziert wird. In dieser kritischen Auseinandersetzung schärfen sich auch der Sinn und die Aufgabenstellung der Phänomenologie als einer Philosophie reiner Immanenz, deren grundlegende metaphysische Dimension die (...)
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