This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
18 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. Charles W. Harvey (1990). Husserl's Phenomenology as Critique of Epistemic Ideology. International Philosophical Quarterly 30 (1):33-42.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. George Heffernan (2009). An Addendum to the Exchange with Walter Hopp on Phenomenology and Fallibility. Husserl Studies 25 (1):51-55.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. George Heffernan (2009). On Husserl's Remark That “[s]Elbst Eine Sich Als Apodiktisch Ausgebende Evidenz Kann Sich Als Täuschung Enthüllen …” (XVII 164:32–33): Does the Phenomenological Method Yield Any Epistemic Infallibility? [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 25 (1):15-43.
    Addressing Walter Hopp’s original application of the distinction between agent-fallibility and method-fallibility to phenomenological inquiry concerning epistemic justification, I question whether these are the only two forms of fallibility that are useful or whether there are not also others that are needed. In doing so, I draw my inspiration from Husserl, who in the beginnings of his phenomenological investigations struggled with the distinction between noetic and noematic analyses. For example, in the Preface to the Second Edition of the Logical Investigations (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. George Heffernan (1999). A Study in the Sedimented Origins of Evidence: Husserl and His Contemporaries Engaged in a Collective Essay in the Phenomenology and Psychology of Epistemic Justification. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 16 (2):83-181.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. George Heffernan (1998). Miscellaneous Lucubrations on Husserl's Answer to the Question 'Was Die Evidenz Sei': A Contribution to the Phenomenology of Evidence on the Occasion of the Publication of Husserliana Volume XXX. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 15 (1):1-75.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Walter Hopp (2009). Phenomenology and Fallibility. Husserl Studies 25 (1):1-14.
    If Husserl is correct, phenomenological inquiry produces knowledge with an extremely high level of epistemic warrant or justification. However, there are several good reasons to think that we are highly fallible at carrying out phenomenological inquiries. It is extremely difficult to engage in phenomenological investigations, and there are very few substantive phenomenological claims that command a widespread consensus. In what follows, I introduce a distinction between method-fallibility and agent-fallibility, and use it to argue that the fact that we are fallible (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Walter Hopp (2009). Reply to Heffernan. Husserl Studies 25 (1):45-49.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Walter Hopp (2008). Husserl, Phenomenology, and Foundationalism. Inquiry 51 (2):194 – 216.
    Husserl is often taken, and not without reason, to endorse the view that phenomenology's task is to provide the “absolute foundation” of human knowledge. In this paper, I will argue that the most natural interpretation of this view, namely that all human knowledge depends for its justification, at least in part, on phenomenological knowledge, is philosophically untenable. I will also present evidence that Husserl himself held no such view, and will argue that Dan Zahavi and John Drummond, though reaching the (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Leszek Kołakowski (1975/2001). Husserl and the Search for Certitude. St. Augustine's Press.
    First lecture: The end -- Second lecture: The means -- Third lecture: The achievements.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Nam-In Lee (2010). Phenomenological Reflections on the Possibility of First Philosophy. Husserl Studies 26 (2):131-145.
    In this paper, I will examine the possibility of first philosophy from a phenomenological point of view. I will do this by assessing Levinas’s criticism of Husserl’s conception of first philosophy. In Sect. 1, I will delineate Husserl’s conception of first philosophy. In Sect. 2, I will introduce Levinas’s conception of ethics as first philosophy and sketch out his criticism of Husserl’s conception of first philosophy. In Sect. 3, I will assess Levinas’s criticism of Husserl’s conception and show that from (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Henry Pietersma (2000). Phenomenological Epistemology. Oxford University Press.
    This work offers a provocative new historical and systematic interpretation of the epistemological doctrines of three twentieth-century giants: Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty. Pietersma argues that these three philosophers, while connected by their phenomenological doctrines, have underappreciated and interestingly-linked views on the theory of knowledge.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Carlos Sanchez (2010). Epistemic Justification and Husserl's Phenomenology of Reason in Ideas I. In Pol Vandevelde & Sebastian Luft (eds.), Epistemology, Archaeology, Ethics: Current Investigations of Husserl's Corpus. Continuum.
    ...In what follows I lay out Husserl's theory of epistemic justification as he sketches it in Part IV of 'Ideas 1', especially in the section he appropriately titles the "Phenomenology of Reason," understood here to present a phenomenological analysis of how reason is given, namely, how reason manifests itself in conscious life. My claim is that Husserl's "phenomenology of reason," by clarifying the ways in which the "legitimizations of reason" take place can be ultimately understood as a theory of epistemic (...)
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Hans Bernhard Schmid (2001). Apodictic Evidence. Husserl Studies 17 (3):217-237.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Michael K. Shim (2000). Descartes and Husserl: The Philosophical Project of Radical Beginnings (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (4):593-595.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Abraham D. Stone (2005). Richard Feist, Ed. 'Husserl and the Sciences'. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 58 (4).
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Abraham D. Stone (2000). On Husserl and Cavellian Scepticism. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (198):1-21.
  17. Ingrid M. Wallner (1985). J. S. Beck and Husserl: The New Episteme in the Kantian Tradition. Journal of the History of Philosophy 23 (2):195-220.
  18. Zhihua Yao (2007). Dharmakīrti and Husserl on Negative Judgments. In Chan-Fai Cheung & Chung-Chi Yu (eds.), Phenomenology 2005, Vol. I, Selected Essays from Asia,. Zeta Books.
    Among various opinions in the controversy over the the cognition of non-existent objects (asad-ālambana-vijñāna) among various Buddhist and Indian philosophical schools or in the debate on the objectless presentations (gegenstandslose Vorstellungen) happened in the early development of phenomenology and analytic philosophy, I find that Dharmakīrti and Husserl hold similar views. Both of them have less interest in redefining the ontological status of nonexistent objects than Russell and Meinong. Rather they engage themselves in analyzing the experiential structure of negative cognition and (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation