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  1. Matt Bower (forthcoming). Husserl’s Theory of Instincts as a Theory of Affection. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology.
    Husserl’s theory of passive experience first came to systematic and detailed expression in the lectures on passive synthesis from the early 1920s, where he discusses pure passivity under the rubric of affection and association. In this paper I suggest that this familiar theory of passive experience is a first approximation leaving important questions unanswered. Focusing primarily on affection, I will show that Husserl did not simply leave his theory untouched. In later manuscripts he significantly reworks the theory of affection in (...)
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  2. Matt Bower (2014). Husserl’s Motivation and Method for Phenomenological Reconstruction. Continental Philosophy Review 47 (2):135-152.
    In this paper I piece present an account of Husserl’s approach to the phenomenological reconstruction of consciousness’ immemorial past, a problem, I suggest, that is quite pertinent for defenders of Lockean psychological continuity views of personal identity. To begin, I sketch the background of the problem facing the very project of a genetic phenomenology, within which the reconstructive analysis is situated. While the young Husserl took genetic matters to be irrelevant to the main task of phenomenology, he would later come (...)
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  3. Ronald Bruzina (2010). Husserl's “Naturalism” and Genetic Phenomenology. New Yearbook for Phenomenology and Phenomenological Philosophy 10 (1):91-125.
  4. Steven Galt Crowell (2002). The Other Husserl: The Horizons of Transcendental Phenomenology (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 40 (1):132-133.
  5. Zachary Davis (2005). Husserl on the Ethical Renewal of Sympathy and the One World of Solidarity. Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (4):561-581.
    Edmund Husserl’s Kaizo articles mark one of his first attempts at notions of cultural renewal and critique. (1) Central to both of these notions for Husserl is the idea of a best possible humanity. At the conclusion of the Kaizo articles, Husserl entertains some quite troubling and potentially dangerous descriptions of the best possible in terms of an Übernation or Weltvolk. Although merely provisional, these descriptions call for a cultural and ethical renewal through the reorientation of humanity in accord with (...)
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  6. Natalie Depraz (2001). The Husserlian Theory of Intersubjectivity as Alterology. Emergent Theories and Wisdom Traditions in the Light of Genetic Phenomenology. Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (5-7):5-7.
  7. Janet Donohoe (2004). Husserl on Ethics and Intersubjectivity: From Static to Genetic Phenomenology. Humanity Books.
    On the distinction between static and genetic phenomenologies -- On time consciousness and its relationship to intersubjectivity -- On the question of intersubjectivity -- The Husserlian account of ethics -- Conclusion: The impact of genetic phenomenology.
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  8. Janet Donohoe (2003). Genetic Phenomenology and the Husserlian Account of Ethics. Philosophy Today 47 (2):160-175.
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  9. Denis Fisette (1991). Jacques Derrida, Le problème de la genèse dans la philosophie de Husserl, Collection Épiméthée, Presses Universitaires de France, Paris, 1990, 292 p.Jacques Derrida, Le problème de la genèse dans la philosophie de Husserl, Collection Épiméthée, Presses Universitaires de France, Paris, 1990, 292 p. [REVIEW] Philosophiques 18 (2):184-188.
  10. Saulius Geniusas (2013). 3 On Nietzsche's Genealogy and Husserl's Genetic Phenomenology. In Christine Daigle & Élodie Boublil (eds.), Nietzsche and Phenomenology: Power, Life, Subjectivity. Indiana University Press. 44.
  11. James G. Hart (1998). Genesis, Instinct, and Reconstruction: Nam-in Lee's Edmund Husserl's Phänomenologie der Instincte. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 15 (2):101-123.
    Nam-In Lee’s impressive study of “instinct” in Husserl1 gives a new sense to Husserl’s self-description of his work as a preoccupation with beginnings (see p. x) because it seeks not only to integrate the theme of instinct systematically into Husserl’s transcendental phenomenology but to demonstrate that it has a fundamental position. I believe the author has successfully demonstrated his contention that other students of Husserl who have treated the theme of instinct as a marginal consideration failed to see that Husserl’s (...)
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  12. Kenneth Knies (2006). Donohoe, Janet, Husserl on Ethics and Intersubjectivity: From Static to Genetic Phenomenology. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 22 (3):249-258.
  13. Mary Jeanne Larrabee (1976). Husserl's Static and Genetic Phenomenology. Man and World 9 (2):163-174.
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  14. Ian Leask (2003). Husserl, Givenness, and the Priority of the Self. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 11 (2):141 – 156.
    This article argues that, despite its apparent radicality, Husserl's later, genetic phenomenology ends up confirming and consolidating a very orthodox transcendental egology.First, the article reconstructs an Husserlian phenomenology of givenness; but then, by considering the ambiguous role of intuition, it also establishes (a) the continued prestige of a 'classical' transcendental subject, and (b) the way in which a denial of ontology allows Husserl's transcendental subject to sublate the provocative challenge of primal Gegebenheit .Overall, the article argues that Husserl is subject (...)
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  15. Nam-In Lee (2002). Static-Phenomenological and Genetic-Phenomenological Concept of Primordiality in Husserl's Fifth Cartesian Meditation. Husserl Studies 18 (3):165-183.
  16. C. Macann (1971). Genetic Production and Transcendental Reduction in Husserl. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 2 (1):28-34.
  17. Wolfe Mays (1977). Genetic-Analysis and Experience-Husserl and Piaget. Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 8 (1):51-56.
  18. Christopher McTavish (2006). Janet Donohoe, Husserl on Ethics and Intersubjectivity: From Static to Genetic Phenomenology Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 26 (2):91-93.
  19. Andrés Miguel Osswald (2014). El concepto de pasividad en Edmund Husserl. Areté 26 (1):33-51.
    The change from static to genetic perspective involves an enlargement of the phenomenological field. The main subject is not anymore the description of the essential notes of a phenomenon but rather the search for its origins. New levels of objects and consciousness arise as consequence of this new approach. The structures of subjectivity revealed by the genetic inquiry constitute the field of passivity.
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  20. Henning Peucker (forthcoming). Hat Husserl Eine Konsistente Theorie des Willens? Das Willensbewusstsein in der Statischen Und der Genetischen Phänomenologie. Husserl Studies:1-27.
    This article raises the question of whether there is one consistent theory of volitional acts in Husserl’s writings. The question arises because Husserl approaches volitional consciousness in his static and his genetic phenomenology rather differently. Static phenomenology understands acts of willing as complex, higher-order phenomena that are founded in both intellectual and emotional acts; while genetic phenomenology describes them as passively motivated phenomena that are implicitly predelineated in feelings, instincts, and drives, which always already include a characteristic element of striving. (...)
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  21. Luis Román Rabanaque (2003). Hyle, Genesis and Noema. Husserl Studies 19 (3):205-215.
    [...] This paper aims, first of all, to recall the main features of hyle in Ideas I, both in its relation to the noema and as critical correction of the concept of sensation. It deals, secondly, with some conflicts arising from Husserl’s parallel characterizations of temporal datum, sensation fields, and hyletic background. In third place, it outlines two central directions in genetic analysis, which allow the hyle to expand to a more complex notion involving temporal- material syntheses whose flow is (...)
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  22. Tetsuya Sakakibara (2008). Struktur Und Genesis der Fremderfahrung Bei Edmund Husserl. Husserl Studies 24 (1):1-14.
    In seiner Fünften Cartesianischen Meditation entwickelt Husserl eine transzendentale Theorie der Fremderfahrung, der sogenannten ,,Einfühlung . Diese Theorie charakterisiert er in dieser Schrift als ,,statische Analyse . Genau besehen werden darin jedoch mehrere genetische Momente der Fremderfahrung in Betracht gezogen. In diesem Aufsatz versucht der Verfasser, zuerst aufgrund einiger nachgelassener Texte Husserls die wesentlichen Charaktere der statischen und der genetischen Methode und auch den Zusammenhang der beiden festzustellen, um dann aus der Analyse der Fünften Meditation die statischen und die genetischen (...)
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  23. Tetsuya Sakakibara (1997). Das Problem Des Ich Und der Ursprung der Genetischen Phänemologie Bei Husserl. Husserl Studies 14 (1):21-39.
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  24. Nicholas Smith (forthcoming). Association in Husserl and Freud – Passivity and the Unconscious. In Luiz-Carlos Pereira Marcia Cavalcante Schuback (ed.), Time and Form. PUC University Press.
  25. Aj Steinbock & E. Husserl (1998). Static and Genetic Phenomenological Method. Continental Philosophy Review 31 (2):135-142.
  26. Aj Steinbock & E. Husserl (1998). The Phenomenology of Monadic Individuality and the Phenomenology of the General Possibilities and Compossibilities of Lived-Experiences: Static and Genetic Phenomenology. Continental Philosophy Review 31 (2):143-152.
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  27. Anthony J. Steinbock & Edmund Husserl (1998). Husserl's Static and Genetic Phenomenology: Translator's Introduction to Two Essays. Essay 1: Static and Genetic Phenomenological Method. Essay 2: The Phenomenology of Monadic Individuality and the Phenomenology of the General Possibilities and Compossibilities of Lived-Experiences: Static and Genetic Phenomenology. [REVIEW] Continental Philosophy Review 31 (2):127-152.
  28. Donn Welton (2003). The Systematicity of Husserl's Transcendental Philosophy: From Static to Genetic Method. In , THE NEW HUSSERL: A Critical Reader. INDIANA University.
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